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Robert Lunte Video Lecture: The Most Difficult Notes To Train

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Robert Lunte
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I agree with Raphael. Excellent video and you make the understanding easier. And I notice, for myself, what the tongue does through the vowel shift.

There you go, again, making something easier by bringing in some crucial understanding.

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Cool vid Rob, informative. I like the camera angles too, keeps it interesting. Still, I'd say the high tenor notes (A4-C5) are harder to sing than the passaggio, but that's just going from my own experience.

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Well, you can't really sing "a passaggio", we sing notes. The Passaggio means "the passage" in Italian and it refers to an imaginary region between the chest and head resonance. You can bridge a Passaggio, but you can't sing one. My point in the video was that the low head tones are the most difficult to train and sing because they are difficult to gain compression or fold closure.

A4 - C5 is not easy either. It does require some interesting vowel modification work to make it respond well. Essentially, for men, A4 is the beginning of a 2nd bridge, not easy, but also not as difficult as the primary bridge around approx. E4.

Can you send us a slow ascending siren from C3 to C4? I would like to hear you bridge and phonate through your low head tones and then hear your notes from A4-C5. Just to get an idea.

Glad you liked the lecture. There are 22 more of them inside "The Four Pillars of Singing" 2.0 , DVD, CD, Book training system.

Hope this helps...

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Cool vid Rob, informative. I like the camera angles too, keeps it interesting. Still, I'd say the high tenor notes (A4-C5) are harder to sing than the passaggio, but that's just going from my own experience.

seth,

interesting comment...

could you shed some light on why you think this? what specifically makes them harder to sing?

it would be very helpful to hear why you say that.

bob

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When it comes to singing curbing or mixed voice (i know that term is forbidden by some but in lack of a better expression)with thick folds i find A4 to D5 more difficult too, especially B4 is very difficult for me, my voice tends skip the B4 and go to C5 instead. When i sing with a lighter mass i experience that the higher notes seem more easy than the notes D4-G4.

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Ooh, I've been called out. My notes from A4-C5 suck, I don't seem to have a problem singing through my passaggio. Robert, do you really want a siren from C3 to C4? C4 seems too early. When I'm in band practice (where i can be loud) I will record a siren on my phone.

And Bob, it's not hitting the notes that is hard, but gettting a good sound. It seems to twangy and thin to me. I can power through the passagio without much problem (I'm not forcing, it doesn't strain me)

Seth.

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Olem, you need to bridge a 2nd time around A4.

Seth, my mistake,,,, I meant C4 - C5. Im not "calling you out"... LOL... I just want to hear it. I do have my doubts on your conclusions, but I'm not saying your wrong or anything... lets dig in and investigate.

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When it comes to singing curbing or mixed voice (i know that term is forbidden by some but in lack of a better expression)with thick folds i find A4 to D5 more difficult too, especially B4 is very difficult for me, my voice tends skip the B4 and go to C5 instead. When i sing with a lighter mass i experience that the higher notes seem more easy than the notes D4-G4.

i think the key here is two important things:

1. holding back the air when you engage more fold and more compression and 2. finding per your own voice just the right vowel shade to ease the tension and get the air stream to the proper place to resonate the best.

it's ironic, i find a strong b4 harder to sing than a c5.

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The middle to high is definitely the hardest part of my voice. B4 - F5 ? Easy, compared to the E4-A4. Man, those are b*tches.

it's important to understand, physiologically know why they're so tough too. knowing why helps you through it. you're butting heads because chest (ta) wants to do it's thing, and head (ct) wants to do its thing and you have to get them to yield to each other.

not exactly how steve fraser would explain it...that was more a street explanation.....lol!!!!

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It was a good explanation Bob, I rather liked it, "... you have to get them to yield to each other". Agreed. The CT and the TA have a similar relationship to each other as the biceps and the triceps. You can visualize the "switching" that happens when bridging the registers to be somewhat like doing a curl, where you flex the bicep on the way up and then as you bring the barbell down, you are engaging the triceps. Thus, we understand that, the CT and TA are always checking and balancing each other.

The calibrations or measurement of how much CT vs TA in the configuration we need to have a perfectly balanced phonation can be examined and identified by drilling on slow and controlled sirens. Each micro-tone has its own CT/TA calibration adjustment. Students of singing need to train these calibration settings enough times that it gets into the muscle memory. Sirens, in a sense, allow us to to "see" and hear and measure our phonations into three components; pitch, time & resonant placement.

Hope this helps...

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