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Keith
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Hey guys, I have TMJ and I'm wondering if there are any exercizes I can do to help my jaw not hurt while singing.. I can make it through my bands hour long set once with no issues at all. Once I have compleed the second set, I feel tension in my jaw and throat - and it's all down hill from there. I can't afford surgery so strengthening the area as much as possible will have to be my salvation, at least for now. ALSO, I have been warming up and practicing with a slighly lowered larnyx - and have been for months. But, now when I do that, I feel tension in my tongue and throat - then I actually start to lose upper range. It works like this. Sing first verse of song then chorus - I am almost destroyed by the end of the chorus - then in the time between the end of the chorus and the next vocal part I rest - then I can sing again, with the same result....

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My jaw pops on the right side. I don't give a flying (place your own curseword here). I have a high tolerance for discomfort and I ain't ashamed to take some Motrin. Or Ibuprofen. Nothing is going to stop me from singing.

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Hey guys, I have TMJ and I'm wondering if there are any exercizes I can do to help my jaw not hurt while singing.. I can make it through my bands hour long set once with no issues at all. Once I have compleed the second set, I feel tension in my jaw and throat - and it's all down hill from there. I can't afford surgery so strengthening the area as much as possible will have to be my salvation, at least for now. ALSO, I have been warming up and practicing with a slighly lowered larnyx - and have been for months. But, now when I do that, I feel tension in my tongue and throat - then I actually start to lose upper range. It works like this. Sing first verse of song then chorus - I am almost destroyed by the end of the chorus - then in the time between the end of the chorus and the next vocal part I rest - then I can sing again, with the same result....

Hi 8DACDDDE (gee, I wish I knew how to pronounce that)

The TMJ is a secondary concern. The primary one is that your singing technique (and song key choices) allow tension to accumulate during the course of a set. IMO, you do not need to strengthen anything, you need to release the hyper (over) functioning muscles phrase-by-phrase, song by song, set-by-set.

The first technique you can use is to add easy jaw and tongue motion every time you are not actually phonating. This is especially useful when there is an interlude or instrumental solo. Even something as simple as swallowing between phrases helps.

The second technique you can use is to find those places in the song where you lose ground, and improve your support/vowel/resonance balance. It may be something as simple as bridging a note earlier in a scale, or re-tooling a section.

A third technique you can use is to begin each set in _absolutely_ your most relaxed jaw situation. Temple, neck and shoulder massages can help with your overall sense of well-being as you go on-stage.

A fourth technique... don't talk between sets. Warm down with some semi-occluded sirens, drink some water, and shut up.

I hope this helps.

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Thanks Steve. I will try alll those things as I do not like the "lock jaw" feeling I have been getting these last few weeks. When warming up and down, is it better to do top down scales or bottom up? Oh, and this forum will not let me edit my username. My name, however, is Keith. :)

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My jaw pops on the right side. I don't give a flying (place your own curseword here). I have a high tolerance for discomfort and I ain't ashamed to take some Motrin. Or Ibuprofen. Nothing is going to stop me from singing.

When I first started singing, the right side of my jaw actually became dislocated a bunch of times. I took like 4 months off singing after that. Now, I am afraid that once I start to feel that tension that it will happen again. I don;t mind the pain as much as I mind the thought of having to put my jaw back in the damn socket on stage lol.

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Thanks Steve. I will try alll those things as I do not like the "lock jaw" feeling I have been getting these last few weeks. When warming up and down, is it better to do top down scales or bottom up? Oh, and this forum will not let me edit my username. My name, however, is Keith. :)

Keith: Of the two, top down is better. Of all the sounds to make, semi-occuded voiced consonants, or as Prof. Titze recommends, sing lightly through a coffee stir :)

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When I first started singing, the right side of my jaw actually became dislocated a bunch of times. I took like 4 months off singing after that. Now, I am afraid that once I start to feel that tension that it will happen again. I don;t mind the pain as much as I mind the thought of having to put my jaw back in the damn socket on stage lol.

Goodness, that does sound inconvenient, even painful. Good luck to you.

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You mentioned that since practising with a lowered larynx you've been experiencing tension in the tongue and throat. This is a problem I'm working on a lot at the moment, it's holding me back a lot. It seems you can lower your larynx the natural way, or the hard way like most of us do when we're singing, and that means tensing up under the jaw there.

Maybe practising from a more neutral larynx position, and finding a way to lower that larynx without stress could help?

Good luck :)

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