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Losing voice on stage

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Dacadey
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Hi everyone!

Actually, this is a question regarding more speaking than singing - but I guess the singers do experience the same thing :cool:

The thing is - at home I can sing and speak pretty well and all that, but when I get on stage (or just talk in front of a public), my throat gets very dry - even if I drink a bottle of water right before the performance - and my voice gets very shallow and loses totally its "boomy" aspect. I guess that's cause I get nervous on stage, and it may pass away with practice, but anyway - have you guys got any vocal or visual techniques or anything of that sort to make sure that your voice stays all right?

Thanks!

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Sounds like you are not drinking enough water... Water is your best friend. Your vocal cords are not your bodies priority for hydration.... So you really need to drink alot of water in order to get good lubrication on the cords. Drinking a bottle right before isn't going to help you. It takes some time even for water to be absorbed and "sent" to where your brain wants it to go.

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Sounds like you are not drinking enough water... Water is your best friend. Your vocal cords are not your bodies priority for hydration.... So you really need to drink alot of water in order to get good lubrication on the cords. Drinking a bottle right before isn't going to help you. It takes some time even for water to be absorbed and "sent" to where your brain wants it to go.

keith, this is a bullshit post. i'll report him now.

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This is pure madness! Sorry for offtop - this is what it looks like on my screen:

I just wrote the word techniques and that's it, I've got no idea why that is turning to something else on your computers

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Hi everyone!

Actually, this is a question regarding more speaking than singing - but I guess the singers do experience the same thing :cool:

The thing is - at home I can sing and speak pretty well and all that, but when I get on stage (or just talk in front of a public), my throat gets very dry - even if I drink a bottle of water right before the performance - and my voice gets very shallow and loses totally its "boomy" aspect. I guess that's cause I get nervous on stage, and it may pass away with practice, but anyway - have you guys got any vocal or visual techniques or anything of that sort to make sure that your voice stays all right?

Thanks!

i don't how it's possible to accidentally insert a link when all you're doing is typing. that link didn't materialize by just typing. you cut and pasted it.

if you're here to sell something, find another audience please. we're here to learn.

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I think you should scan your computer for viruses and trojan etc...

When under great stress, my mouth and throat and vocal folds get suddenly extra dry (talking desert dry with super hoarse voice and no saliva left to swallow whatsoever). It's wildly annoying, so I'm following this thread for any idea :)

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Okay back to the topic :cool:

I've tried drinking plenty of water - close to two liters a day - but the stress factor seems to be outweighing all the water I could possibly drink.

So two ways I can think of dealing with it:

1) The non-vocal - you know, positive self-talk, imagining the audience naked, listening to inspirational music beforehand - just wondering if any of you guys are successfully using anything from this direction?

2) The vocal - and here I've got no idea. Maybe start with resonant tracking before getting to the mike? Or do something else to sound all right for the first couple of seconds and then just stick to it?

I think you should scan your computer for viruses and trojan etc...

When under great stress, my mouth and throat and vocal folds get suddenly extra dry (talking desert dry with super hoarse voice and no saliva left to swallow whatsoever). It's wildly annoying, so I'm following this thread for any idea :)

Yeah, that's the one I have :)

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Nervousness can dry your throat out no matter how much water you drink. It is physiological. You know what works really well to keep the mouth and throat just about perfectly hydrated is VocalZone pastilles. I don't work for this company and have nothing to do with that company but these things really work. Not only hydrates the voice, but gets rid of phlem. It is licorice based. You just stick one in your mouth inbetween your cheek and your teeth - lasts for a long time. I always use them during a recording session just to keep the voice in optimal condition.

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Salanar,

3 things that might help:

1) Own your material. Absolutely master whatever it is you'll be speaking/singing. To me this is the biggest one. It's almost impossible to fail if you are that confident in your performance. Of course, in the real world, you sometimes have to perform stuff that you aren't that familiar with. In that case:

2) Perform A LOT. The more you do it, the easier everything becomes. You will stop caring as much, and in turn, will not give a (*auto edit*) about flopping and so no dry mouth/tight throat/etc.

3) If you're into visualization/meditation...visualize doing a perfect job. Make it as real as possible making sure to use all the emotion you would feel if you absolutely nail your performance. This certainly works, but I find I get extremely lazy and blase after a few successes so quit doing it. it will absolutely help you get over the hump though.

What exactly are you performing and how often?

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  • Administrator

Yes, Thank You Salanar.... I'm positive it was an inadvertent mistake/"glitch", or perhaps Ronron was correct in suggesting that you scan your computer for viruses or trojans.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Note : I personally pour through the Forum as well as the Main Site several times daily in a continued effort to remove the spammers and other inappropriate content.

(Generally, it's between the hours of 1 P.M and 1 AM due to my schedule). However, on occasion some of the spam seems to "slip through".

If anyone notices such activity, please do not hesitate to contact me and I will remove it ASAP !!!

We sincerely appreciate the members attentiveness, dedication and commitment to The Modern Vocalist !!!

Respectfully,

Adolph

Please Note : For some reason, if you click on "Email" under my name in the left hand pane, for some reason you will be directed to a Yahoo account.... ???

Kindly contact me at one of the links/addresses as listed in my "Signature".

Thank you :cool:

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Hi everyone,

In my case in complement of good hydratation i take Homeovox it's homeopathy, it's generally use to prevent voice loss but in my case work well to avoid dry mouth session. don't know if it's exist in every country but think you can find an equivalent.

Good continuation

Ps: the composition is : Aconitum napellus 3 CH, Arum triphyllum 3 CH, Ferrum phosphoricum 6 CH, Calendula 6 CH, Spongia tosta 6 CH, Belladonna 6 CH, Mercurius solubilis 6 CH, Hepar sulfur 6 CH, Kalium bichromicum 6 CH, Populus candicans 6 CH, Bryonia dioica 3 CH

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Kindle

See how easy that was? All I did was type the letters k i n d l e close together, as in a word. I think it has to do with the atuto-suggest on these social media link buttons in here.

While we're on the subject, why are there different rules for different people, Adolph? For example, some time ago, I was warned that I would be expelled rather quickly and the issue was my "behavior" and my "profanity."

Yet, others here use profanity and that is okay.

Nor am I complaining. I understand that the rules for Ron are different than the rules for everyone else. It's just an academic question, really. What is the value or use of different rules for different people?

As for the original question, yes, it is stagefright. You can combat that by thinking about what the audience wants to hear, rather than how you feel in front of them. Stagefright is self-centeredness. Get out of yourself and put yourself in their place.

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