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Jamie Venderas Transceding Tone Excersise

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neugie92
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with transcending tone (which is another word for messa di voce), he's asking you to swell from a light head voice to full voice, not falsetto.

this is will take a long time to get even close to right. i've learned from anthony frisell if you don't have similar development levels between your head register and chest register it will make things very difficult.

it's a masterful achievement to work towards. do not expect immediate results. it has to be developed.

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here's what you do, man: this exercise is actually a lot simpler than you think. simply start on a light voice, NO BREATHINESS!...and...SLOWWWLY...raise the volume. Don't think about going higher or anything, just concentrate on RAISING THE VOLUME.

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@ Stan - wow, I'm jealous :) if you find the messa di voce easy, i want in!! Been on it for a while, and its a great exercise to work on, but a toughie as far as my voice is concerned! There are times when it just 'happens' beautifully, and then other times where I got nuts trying a repeat performance.. anyway.. just my 2 bits..

@neugie92 - It takes time to get the Transcending Tone right, not really one of those things that get mastered in a few sessions.. keep at it.. just remember not to force the sound out.. having said that, it DOES take a little more breath pressure than is usually applied in most exercises (for the 'swelling' to take place properly).. simple rule - if it hurts, you're doing it wrong!

cheers

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I found a very good link on MDV a few days ago. There is one part where a survey is conducted on teachers who teach it and they explain what it does for their students http://etd.ohiolink.edu/view.cgi/Pulte%20Diane%20M.pdf?osu1129655696

I can also do it fairly easily but I see no point... seems to be mostly applicable to ballads and opera, otherwise you may have to be very creative in its application.

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@ Asim - no point? This one exercise gives you complete control over pretty much every type of note you can hit in your range.. Think of the possibilitities.. And it has to do with a lot more than just opera or ballads! It's the difference between yelling out the highest note in your range and singing it with the appropriate dynamics as required by the song!

Cheers

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not to mention dynamics, flexibility, and strength, but it's a bitch and a half to master, so a lot of folks do an end around on it...lol!!!!

i read jeffrey allan's book and he said your voice will improve even by just trying to execute it.

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raphaels, I clicked your link and two high school friends - Marcus Lezama and Chris Baggs - like your band! What a strange coincidence.

@ Asim - no point? This one exercise gives you complete control over pretty much every type of note you can hit in your range.. Think of the possibilitities.. And it has to do with a lot more than just opera or ballads! It's the difference between yelling out the highest note in your range and singing it with the appropriate dynamics as required by the song!

Cheers

Hmm, I never considered that. I just don't understand how one could apply the training of MDV on individual notes and apply it to whole songs. That is a LOT of muscle memory to instill. Perhaps if you did MDV scales custom made for each song...

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I say that because you don't sing with your back or with your abs. If you did my back would be killing me and I would make the Situation look like Fat Albert. Singing from your back doesn't sound too healthy to me.

cunodante is right american....all the power and control in your voice comes from your lower core (abs, back, sides).

and if you are an appoggio technique singer (before you ask what appoggio is look it up, or see franco tenelli videos) it's even more important. ideally, you want to be able to take the effort of singing with those lower core muscles. (yes, singing with those muscles will tire you if you're not used to them.) but if you learn to lean into them, you will divert the tension away from the throat to such a degree that the throat seems passive in singing.

this is highly desirable, but it takes time to strenghten and develop this lower core area. when this area is conditioned and well developed, you can do some amazing things with your voice.

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My body and cells are doing a lot of things that contribute to singing. I could not sing if I was dead. But when it comes down to it, you should not be standing still and hard like a rock, with pressurized abs and a rigid back, to get a pleasant sound. You tell somebody that it comes from the back and abs, you know what you get? A voice no one is gonna want to listen to for very long. Dio has as masculine a voice you're ever gonna hear, and he is flexible, calm, cool, and collected. No backache, no ripping abs. My stuff is at reverbnation/americanritual.

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I think we're talking about physiological facts here. The trunk muscles engage in singing, there is no doubt. However some people do indeed push too hard and contract muscles unnecessarily (although even this can be helpful in the learning process). As long as your particular teaching methods help your students, then that is the answer, right?

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The one thing that is mobile on me is the abs. Nothing rigid about it. But those are the muscles in motion. The few times I tried doing something in the throat, I messed myself up. Heed my philosophy, delivered on high, in the form of a burning bush. No strain in the throat, ever. Amen.

Action in the abs, resonance in the head, nothing in the throat. Period, paragraph, new book.

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neugie92, see my post on how to do TT right. It's very simple to do. Don't let anything else confuse you. If you need a more detailed explanation, shoot me an e-mail.

stan, i'm surprised you find this easy.

a friendly challenge...send us over a messa di voce (transcending tone)...soft to loud to soft, you pick the vowel, on g4..as they say... "i think you're laboring under a misapprehension."

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Bob, here's why I think the exercise is easier than you think. I ran this by Jaime, and he agreed.

Here's what you do. Sustain a very light, "yay", as Jaime says. But it instead of PUSHING/FORCING or CONCENTRATING ON SWELLING THE TONE TO FULL VOICE....... do this...... SLOWLY RAISE THE VOLUME. in other words, when doing the exercise, just think the only thing you need to do is RAISE THE VOLUME. raise the volume on that soft falsetto "Yay".... DONT PUSH, DONT DO ANYTHING!! JUST RAISE THE VOLUME. im telling you. thinking this way about the exercise helped me.

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okay, sounds good stan. but that isn't the "real" messa di voce. that's still a good exercise. i got cha.

hey bob, well, i was explaining Jaime's transcending tone, which i thought was the same thing :P

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okay, sounds good stan. but that isn't the "real" messa di voce. that's still a good exercise. i got cha.

What? I always thought that the "messa di voce" was just a fancy Italian name for a volume swell, i.e. going from soft to loud on a single sustained pitch. Is that not true?

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