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All words at the same volume?

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jonpall
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Just curious guys - when you sing, in particular notes in the passagio and a bit higher - do you sing all words with the same volume or do you allow some words to be louder, in particular words with very open vowels like Oh and Eh? Or ... would you usually modify those big, open vowels to slightly more closed ones, like perhaps Uh and I? Just wondering what your preference is?

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try do to what i am able to do most of the time lol. But honestly it really depends on the dynamic of the song. the only thing i'm sure that i avoid the use of high volume ont the EE vowel, so hard to sing...

I also try to keep always the same volume in that range, try to put more power when it needs to but not more volume, i'm a natural "shouter" lol...

by the way, jonpall would love to have your ears listening to my last try at a Kotzen song, you've always gave me such great advices ^^ link in my signature

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try do to what i am able to do most of the time lol. But honestly it really depends on the dynamic of the song. the only thing i'm sure that i avoid the use of high volume ont the EE vowel, so hard to sing...

I also try to keep always the same volume in that range, try to put more power when it needs to but not more volume, i'm a natural "shouter" lol...

by the way, jonpall would love to have your ears listening to my last try at a Kotzen song, you've always gave me such great advices ^^ link in my signature

i love kotzen. i just heard a nice vocal with him and eric martin.

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jonpall - I'm traditionally singing from the bel canto approach which tries to equalize vowels / brightness and volume. But I'll throw in the overdrive mode when needed - whatever the song calls for. When I record I'm always watching the wave file that I'm generating because it makes mixing so much easier. I hate having to tweak using volume envelopes. I'd rather re-record than deal with uneven wave files. I'll use distance from the mic to equalize everything, like getting really close for low notes and standing further away for real high stuff. It's surprising though because what I think shouldn't be loud shows up in the wave file as loud and vica versa.

joshual - I know what you mean about the "ee" vowel. I've been doing the CVT neutral exercises every day for the last 6 months, which are all on "ee" really lightly. This has helped my loud ee's tremendously for some reason.

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hey jonpall for me it depends on what Im singing. If one of my students is singing a church hymn in a choir or a pretty ballad I might have them go to a narrower vowel. But if they are singing a high hard rock tune I won't have them go to the narrow vowel but just maybe think the narrow vowel, sing ah think uh(book). Try that it may help and remember the more openish you are on a vowel you need a little more support.

hope that helps

Daniel

www.Danielformicavocalstudio.com

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hey guys i just threw this together because we are talking about it

listen to it notice how only the resonance makes it a little louder i'm not straining and Im not letting go of the chest connection. I could have been fancy and did it over and over or edited but I wanted to be live and off the cuff. I could create more connection just by standing up and going for it a little more. There is no effort here especially where everyone speaks of passagio on f# and g and ab listen to those. They are done very relaxed.

I hope this helps

Daniel

www.Danielformicavocalstudio.com

Be nice

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Right now I'm liking the style of allowing certain words/vowels to sound louder and bigger then others. Take the line "here I am" from Journey's "Open arms", as an example. It's all on A4. The words "here" and "I" can have lower volume than the final word, "am". At least that's how Arnel Pineda does it. Steve Perry would probably more likely to have a unified volume, from what I've heard. I think that Adam Lambert is another singer who allows big vowels to actually sound big. At the moment I'm liking this sound and it seems to tie well with the idea of lifting the cheekbones while singing in the high part of the voice - because then you only have to drop your jaw slightly more for those more open vowels, like Eh and Oh.

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Good thread JP! I guess what this question really boils down to is whether you deliberately choose a mode, or let the vowels choose the mode for you.

For me at least, this depends mostly on the song. If it's an aggressive song, then I will modify into overdrive, get very loud and shouty, usually with some edge and effects mixed in. If it's a very high song for me (Ab4 and above), I will modify into curbing and focus on keeping the mode secure. For most songs though, I just let the vowel guide me.

It's pretty interesting watching the volume while recording... switching from curbing to OD at a high note increases my volume by about 15-20dB, so if I'm singing a song with lots of vowel changes, it makes for a pretty dynamic waveform! I've started modifying vowels while recording to compensate for this.

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