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Anyone find a good perfect pitch system?

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neugie92
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I have real trouble staying on pitch without a guide melody track in the background to help me. Im usually slightly flat and I cant seem to fix it. Has anyone found a good perfect pitch system i know theres a bunch of them but has anyone found one that truely worked for them.

-Im a songwriter and until i can pitch my songs to other artists i need to be able to sing them perfectly.

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I have real trouble staying on pitch without a guide melody track in the background to help me. Im usually slightly flat and I cant seem to fix it. Has anyone found a good perfect pitch system i know theres a bunch of them but has anyone found one that truely worked for them.

-Im a songwriter and until i can pitch my songs to other artists i need to be able to sing them perfectly.

are you singing with support?

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-VIDEOHERE

I believe so, I have bought many books on breathing excersises for singers and believe i have good breath support. Its possible that while i take proper chest by fillin up my belly i may not support my singing properly. What are you supposed to do once youve taken your breath and are about to sing?

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At a pro level, you're holding your breath. Same as trying to speak underwater. Early on, this is difficult and you have to be aware of tension and damage. As far as pitch, the best thing you can do is exercises with intervals. Any program will have these. Knowing what a C# sounds like will NOT help you communicate to your larynx how to hit it. My diagnosis is sing in the mask, sing bright, and work with scales and interval exercises. You'll improve. You aren't tone deaf. It's something between your ear, brain, and larynx. Strengthen the infrastructure between those channels and you'll have it!

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I had trouble with pitch when I started. I recommend you keep singing to melodies and that you

1) Play a note (on guitar, piano whatever you got)

2) Sing that note (while it's still playing from the instrument and while it is not playing)

and

1) Play a sequence of notes (a two note sequence is enough)

2) Sing it without playing

3) Sing it while playing the sequence of notes.

If you are playing an instrument you should sing the notes of a scale while you practice it. It will make you better at singing the right pitch and it will make your playing better as well.

Do this for a while and see if you feel an improvement.

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Try to vision yoursef singing "on top" of the note... Not sharp, just on top of it. Sounds dumb, I know, But try it anyway. If you are always slightly flat or sharp, and you realize it, then it's not a pitch issue (like being tone deaf). Close your eyes and imagine you are floating on top of the notes. I have to do this once in a while myself..

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-VIDEOHERE

I believe so, I have bought many books on breathing excersises for singers and believe i have good breath support. Its possible that while i take proper chest by fillin up my belly i may not support my singing properly. What are you supposed to do once youve taken your breath and are about to sing?

do lip bubbles on a simple 5-note scale or a steady tone and check for ease of production, looseness of the lips, and eveness of tone.

sing on a comfortable note the vowel "ah" medium volume and hold it steady no wavering of tone and try for 12-15 seconds working your way up to 20 seconds or more.

can you send over samples of these?

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I know I said it before, but ear training will help a lot with this. Yeah, breath control is important, but if you can even hum the right note, you're obviously training your pitch/ears/voice without any extravagant opera like mannerism, and you can get a better ear and feel for the relationships between notes.

Aside from that, I've heard the advice of practicing singing above a note and slipping down to it to break out of the habit off always aiming too low. Somewhat similar to 'landing on top of the note.'

You might actually want to intentionally go between sharp and flat, and try to find some kind of 'center.'' I've heard of people trying like guitar tuners, but vibrato can make those pretty tricky.

Another thing that might help is just playing along with 'chords' or something on a guitar or piano. Don't play along explicitly with a melody guide track, but with something that is 'in tune' and try to feel out where the harmony is strongest.

Anyway, it might help to just slow down, and focus on visualizing one note. Maybe play it on a keyboard. Sing it, and then sing without the keyboard. Allow yourself to 'move around' the note. Try to get some fluidity. If you can get a feel for both what sharp and flat sound like and feel like, that might help you find your center.

One thing I can't stress enough, is almost everything musical I've ever done, takes a lot of practice. There are exceptions for people who generally start very young (five and under), as our brains absorb information and process things a bit differently then, but as an adult, there are few better remedies than smart and persistent targeted practice. It may be tempting to think you'll find immediate results, some miracle cure, but sometimes there is no quick fix, and you have to hammer away at certain things. But I've never found anything that cannot be improved upon.

You just need to give each method a fair shake and a good effort, before you toss it away.

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  • 6 months later...

Another form of language is Relative pitch. Relative pitch is being able to figure out notes while having a reference note there for you. You can probably figure out if a given note is higher or lower than the C note when someone plays that note and the C note in succession. This takes little training, but is vital in helping you learn perfect pitch.

absolute pitch training

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Another form of language is Relative pitch. Relative pitch is being able to figure out notes while having a reference note there for you. You can probably figure out if a given note is higher or lower than the C note when someone plays that note and the C note in succession. This takes little training, but is vital in helping you learn perfect pitch.

absolute pitch training

Hi Kim, I've just taken a look at the website you mentioned. Have you tried this method and had success with it?

I remember borrowing Davis Lucas Burge's course at the library, and trying to learn perfect pitch with it, but quickly gave up. I've always worked on relative pitch: recognizing chords, chord progressions, play back melodies by ear... But perfect pitch would indeed be an awesome skill to have!

Nick

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