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What to do after youve taken a diaphramatic breath?

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neugie92
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It can be as complicated as you want to make it. Or you can breathe like babies do, and simply hold the breath throughout your phrase. No tension, little stomach movement. Infinite sustain. Next phrase, you top yourself off; or completely let go and completely relax and start over on every phrase.

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You do not control the diaphragm. What you should do is relax the stomach muscles, which allows the diahphragm to draw in air. The diaphragm is an autonomic muscle (works by reflex.) Robert Lunte does an absolutely perfect example of this in his file on breathing exercise.

Then, when you sing, compression of muscles is in the lower abdomen, not the chest. And that gives you the push to drive the note. And it is subtle. But the majority of movement in singing is in your abs. Forever, amen.

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this is a very interesting topic! i learned diaphragmatic breathing a few years ago and i really dont know how to relate it to improve in any way my singing! the only thing i got was that, with this breathing, to remove part of the straining that my shoulders used to make to my neck, but, nothing else!

can you explain a little bit more please? that sounds very key! :)

it doesn't just improve your singing, it is your singing engine.

the more control you have over your breathing, the better you will sing...it's just that simple.

you've got to read about it, watch videos, do the deal...

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Take the breath in. Chest doesn't move. Shoulders don't move. Stomach puffs out, just like a baby. The exact same moment you vocalize is when the air gets released. Just a little bit. Almost nothing. No one would even know you were releasing breath. Only you do. The air feels as if it is in your stomach, a column of energy and fullness. Near-infinite sustain. No tension in the abs, no matter what some guys say. Listen to their voice clips, those ab guys, ha ha!

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yes but how do you relate this with your voice? the question is: what to do AFTER, i think we all know how to breath this way xD but the point is how you create support with this? how you can assist your voice with the breathing?

and the thing that americanritual said for me has part of the answer but i would like so much if anyone can explain it a little bit more!

how can we hold the breath?

I am in the same boat. Everytime I think I understand support I lose it and can't find it again. I can belly breathe all day long but I have never understood what I am supposed to do or feel after that when vocalising.

I need to find a vocal coach who can physically SHOW me what it is I am missing.

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I am in the exact same boat, which is what I think is causing the majority of my vocal tension. I know how to take a breath in, however, I have some teachers who tell me to relax my abdomen and some have told me to tighten it. Some have told me to relax while singing and some have told me to control the breath. And no one explained that breath pressure is different for high and low notes. I have been singing for over 10 years and I still don't know how to breathe correctly. It's improved over the years as I no longer breathe through my chest, so maybe that is something, but I would really like to learn what to do while I am sustaining the breath.

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Diaphragmatic breathing is just the beginning. The real part is being able to control the release of air. Some people say that "support" is really breathing out and breathing in at the same time, which I think is quite true. Try this:

Imagine you are having a breath-holding competition with a friend in a pool. Duck your head underwater and hold your breath.

What you will most likely find is that you hold your breath by closing your throat, like pinching the end of a balloon. Your mouth will probably also close but notice that probably isn't what is REALLY holding the lungs shut.

Now try holding your breath, then just open the throat. In this situation, you are neither breathing in nor breathing out, but the throat is open.

Try shifting back and forth between holding the breath with the throat (as most people do, and as would be VERY wise to do when underwater) and with the throat open. Notice that muscles in your midsection activate without you controlling them.

Stephen Fraser has posted many, many good posts on this topic, and I strongly suggest searching for his insight on the matter.

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I am in the exact same boat, which is what I think is causing the majority of my vocal tension. I know how to take a breath in, however, I have some teachers who tell me to relax my abdomen and some have told me to tighten it. Some have told me to relax while singing and some have told me to control the breath. And no one explained that breath pressure is different for high and low notes. I have been singing for over 10 years and I still don't know how to breathe correctly. It's improved over the years as I no longer breathe through my chest, so maybe that is something, but I would really like to learn what to do while I am sustaining the breath.

how you use support for singing has a lot to do with the the needs of the song. for some songs, or sections of a song there may be very little needed.

it varies. but if you just reduce the technique to its lowest terms, you are developing the ability to control the expiration of your air. when we breathe normally the air is inhaled and exhaled automatically. when you sing, inhalation needs to be more efficient, and exhalation more metered.

does this help?

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Let me see if I can answer this better than I did the last time.

To me, "diaphragmatic" breathing simply means that you are not breathing with the chest. You relax the abs to allow the diaphragm, an autonomic muscle, to flex and draw in air. Then, as you sing, compression from the abs compresses organs against the diaphragm. Here, you can control the air speed and pressure as you sing the note.

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