Jump to content

Can someone please explain twang?

Rate this topic


neugie92
 Share

Recommended Posts

If you're going into falsetto it's probably head voice you want to understand, not so much twang (although twang does make high notes easier to hit.) Can you sing in head voice? Or are you just looking to sing higher in chest voice?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Im just looking to be able to sing comfortably and tension free at my high points of chest F4 G4? have any advice?

neugie92: NCdan and geran89 are giving you good advice. While very valuable, twang alone won't get you where you want to go, which is a basic workable coordination of the larngeal muscles during phonation.

What is happening is that you are oversinging... which is the application of too much exhalation force during phonation. This causes the laryngeal muscles to 'over-flex', to resist the extra force. While this works somewhat for the lower part of the range, it will not transition smoothly to the top voice.

There are many ways to appraoch this, as many ways as there are students and teachers of it. The undergirding physical principles are the same:

1) Slow down the exhalation

2) leave the throat unconstricted

3) allow the registration to vary smoothly

4) produce resonant vowels

These are easily said, but difficult to convert into action without exercises. Here is a way to start for each of them:

1) Sitting comfortably, with your throat relaxed, take a slow breath until 1/2 full, slowing down the inhalation as you reach 1/2, so that you feel like you are still inhaling, but the air is no longer moving. This point is the balance of inhalation and exhalation, where the forces that work to blow air out of your body are balanced with those that are bringing the air in. If you reduce the inhalation thought just a little, you will begin to exhale, but very slowly. Do this slow inhalation, and the slow exhalation, for about 15 minutes a day for 2 weeks. By the end of that, you will begin to get physical sense of having this balance. The reason for this? Singing is done while maintaining this sense of balance, as it is this balance that prevents the excess exhalation force.

2) Once you have the sense of #1, add siren phonation on a semi-occluded voiced consonant. The one most accessible (and successful) for English speakers is the 'TH' at the beginning of the word 'The'. Take the 1/2 breath described above, and at the point of balance, make this consonant softly and clearly, while maintaining the sense of balance as much as is possible. It will not be possible to maintain the sens completely, as the desire to make the vocal sound will upset it just enough to power the sound. However, you will find that you can make this sound with very little breath, and no sense of 'blowing' the note out. It simply draws the breath it needs from the balance.

What is the siren? Its a smooth slide. Once you can start a note in #2 on the consonant with the sense of balance maintained, slide the note around, maintaining softness and clarity. Practice this for 15 minutes a day for a couple or three weeks. As you gain familiarity, you will feel comfortable widening the pitch range upward and downward.

That will get you started.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1) Sitting comfortably, with your throat relaxed, take a slow breath until 1/2 full, slowing down the inhalation as you reach 1/2, so that you feel like you are still inhaling, but the air is no longer moving. This point is the balance of inhalation and exhalation, where the forces that work to blow air out of your body are balanced with those that are bringing the air in. If you reduce the inhalation thought just a little, you will begin to exhale, but very slowly. Do this slow inhalation, and the slow exhalation, for about 15 minutes a day for 2 weeks. By the end of that, you will begin to get physical sense of having this balance. The reason for this? Singing is done while maintaining this sense of balance, as it is this balance that prevents the excess exhalation force.

The exercise that made me realise what "breathing" for singing is really all about. Do this!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Steven--- Thank you for taking the time to help me with this i really do appreciate it.

Just so i understand correctly you just practice the inhaling and exhaling slowly for 15 minutes?

neugie92: Yes, that is how you begin to acquaint yourself with the actions and the sensations of the breath balance.

The reason that I start with this is that just about everybody can get the concept easily, but in breathing for life, expecially for sport, we don't do this.

I hope this helps.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...