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hugo
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I would like to sing in a band within a month, and i would like to sound like dave mustaine, like in this video : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kn7ZV3ED46M

Would you be able to tell me witch vocal techniques he uses, and eventually, some tips to do them ?

Thanks a lot, and scuse me for some words that don't exist, i'm french ^^'

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I have blown my voice out trying to sound like Mustaine - The Conjuring is a bad ass song to sing. The newer stuff is easier. Just try to sound as thin as possible while adding some overdrive. If you were to ask Dave how he sounds that way, he would just say thats just his voice. I know, because I have met him and I asked that very quesiton. Good luck man, I'm sure you sound great, Upload something you are singing if you want some real help - so we can hear what you are doing and / or not doing.

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I don´t think Mustaine has great technique because he is often hoarse on stage. I saw him at the big four concert in Gothenburg and he had no voice, very hoarse. It´s a little strange because he took vocal lessons before the "Risk" album. But i think he has a very characteristic voice and sounds cool. Read Jon´s thread about rasp on this forum, i think you could learn alot from there.

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He's not using very much technique at all actually. Singing like that technically shouldn't be too hard to do, so basically I'll have to jump on the bandwagon here and agree with jonpall and the others.

He's singing with an untrained voice, like raphaels said.

In the entire first verse, what he's doing is exactly what many people do when they try to get rasp in their voice: clench up the throat and force sound through it. You can hear the strain many times, and the grit that comes out is exactly that of what I mentioned. It's produced ON the vocal cords themselves, as far as I'm aware, because it does make you hoarse, and even might make you cough if you push it too hard.

In the chorus he's doing the same thing, but he loosens it up when it seems to me that he goes into the headvoice register.

This might be "bad advice" according to vocal teachers and people who protect their voice, but you can get a sound like him by straining the voice/clenching the throat, but practicing it enough so that you have better control of the pitch through the strain. I know because I used to sing like that, but I gave it up when I kept going hoarse, and it didn't sound like the kind of raspy voice I wanted, as the voice sounds pinched.

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hugo - I'm not sure what level you are currently at - can you post a clip of yourself singing this song or part of it? Especially the chorus. I beleive you can acheive a healthy technique that can sound as good or better than Dave. Whether you can do this in one month or not is hard to tell depending on where you are currently at. This can be a long term development process.

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Of all of the singers to emulate, I have to admit this guy is out of left field for me. I had no idea people aspired to this kind of vocal.

I've been a casual fan of Megadeth for some time, but as a singer he has a very distinct and unusual voicing and it's not the kind of sound most singers seem to aspire towards (range, power, fullness, etc). To me he sounds a bit like a cartoon character, and I think that's part of why I find Megadeth more entertaining than a lot of other metal music. I don't know if it's intended to have an element of comedy to it, but both his voice and lyrics on top of the thrash tend to crack me up (in a good way).

Personal tastes aside, I think you are onto something, Hugo, in that there is 'always' a technique. One thing about most successful singers, is whether they are Dave Mustaine, Pavarrotti, Neil Young, or Celine Dion, they all have/had their techniques that they can reproduce that 'identity' of voice.

Now what I've come to understand over the years, is opposed to there being 'singers with technique' and singers without, it's more that certain techniques are more 'well documented.' Some produce more or less range, some produce different tones, and some are more or less healthy than others.

The thing about someone like Dave Mustaine, is his 'technique'

1. Is not well documented and thus probably difficult to describe how to reproduce.

2. Probably has limited range

3. Has a really cool (and unique) character to it

4. Could be potentially damaging (it sounds that way to me, but he's still out there doing it)

While I've never heard Mustaine as a guy I wanted to emulate, I actually fully understand what it's like to love voices that are more like that than not, in that they have very unique character. Almost all of my favorite singers aren't technical gods, John Lennon, Nina Simone, David Bowie, Al Green. For me out of my favorites, only David Ruffin has an incredible range, and he's a raspy soul shouter who a lot of opera heads would have poo poo'd on for his 'improper' technique.

Now this is a long winded post, but I think I do have a point. As far as medical science has come, singing technique is still a fiercely personal thing in popular music, and I have my doubts that anyone completely understands how to reproduce another person's technique in this field. You not only have people with totally different setups (larynx, pharynx, vocal cord size, and endless other differences), but there are also subtle internal alterations in shaping of the tongue, vowel formation, and muscular coordination that all need to be in a certain harmony to achieve a specific sound.

On the other hand, people have been singing operatically for so long it's ridiculous and have often achieved 'more similar sounds' through documentation and teaching of certain methods. What you have is a technique there that can be 'shared' or taught effectively. That doesn't mean however, that Pavarotti used a technique while Dave Mustaine does not. It's just that Mustaine's technique is limited in some ways, potentially damaging, and has not been passed down or documented as reproduceable. Now maybe something like CVT or one of the more scientific voice studies will get 'closer' to demystifying what he's doing, but as of this moment, it's pretty much his 'thing.' Some people might stumble across it on accident, but few likely know how to teach you how to do it just like him, much less safely.

While I think the perceptions so far sound kind of likely about Mustaine clenching, snarling, and growling (it sounds that way to me too), I think at best most can kind of guess, what someone like that does based on how it feels when we try something similar.

Now, I'm going to finish this post, saying that as a musician, and as a former singer, I valued artistic expression and 'unique' character of a singer above technical excellence and I always will. Technique is a means to an end, art 'is' the end. But as a singer, I trashed my voice somehow, seemingly beyond repair. I don't know for exact sure 'how' it happened, and neither do the doctors, scientists or vocal coaches so far. Would that have happened if I had learned opera and stuck to tried and true documented 'techniques'? Probably not. I was trying all sorts of things that were under documented and unknown and chances are, one of those things did me in.

So I guess my advice would be, to tread cautiously. Maybe instead of trying to get "Mustaine growl' you can look into trying to get 'your growl,' what feels right for your voice and for you. When I hear him, I imagine clenching up and tearing my throat up like Bugs Bunny growling like the devil, it does sound 'pinched.' If that tone doesn't come naturally to you, and it's not a documented technique you can learn from, maybe you should look into more documented stuff or do your own thing? Speaking as a fellow admirer of artistic voices, taking care of your own, and trying to find your own voice that works for you, will likely be better goals than pursuing a specific, possibly unachievable 'sound' someone else made without a roadmap.

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I have to agree wth Killer.... Be careful with this. Liek I said, my band used to play "The Counjuring" and every time I sang it, it killed me. I could sing the notes just fine in my own style, but adding his rasp and "clenched" sound just made me go hoarse. Needless to say, I no longer sing that one lol.

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Good post by KillerKu. Hugo, you could try to post a clip of Dave Mustaine singing, and I (or someone else) could take a shot at describing his technique and how to do it. But ultimately I suggest that you seek to find what's unique and cool about your own voice.

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good post by killer. please, understand also that some singers have much more resilient vocal folds that can tolerate the pounding.

speaking from my recent polyp experience, (which quite frankly i still have no confirmed idea of how i got this damn thing) you simply have no assurance that you might be one of those singers with more delicate folds and no one, not even a teacher or doctor (i found out) can tell you how much you can or cannot handle without injury.

singing dangerously is simply not one of guts and balls but one of ignorance.

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I agree with the others and personally have always tried to find my own unique style. Of course some of the comedic impersonators are incredibly talented in emulating other's vocal technique. It's up to you which approach you take. I would encourage that you find your own style - in a healthy way. You were born with the equipment and ability to come up with something unique that can be more exciting and marketable than Dave Mustaine. If you need rasp or distortion there are plenty of techniques that are healthy (and documented) - CVT is great for this. The other benefit of applying your own style to music from a well known band is that you can freshen things up and create a lot of interest. Of course you may be in a Megadeth "tribute" band where they want you to sound as close to Dave Mustaine as you can. I still beleive this can be acheived in a healthy way.

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Scuse my ignorance, but what CVT is ?

Anyway, i'm gonna put a video of myself singing on this topic within 2 weeks, thanks you all for your contribution, it's rare seing people that helpful on forums.

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