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vowel mod. for a more "chesty" heavy metal singer up in the high range

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Olem
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One thing i have thought alot about is: There are many different approaches only in the heavy metal genre. We have for example Geoff Tate and Tony Harnell with a more "heady" approach and then we have for exampel Ronnie James Dio and Bruce Dickinson with a more "chesty" approach up in the high range. Do the vowel choice between them differ up there in the high range? If i would make a guess i would say it does.

That leads me to: If u are very interested in one type of sound in the heavy metal genre, the more "chesty" approach of Dio or Dickinson what will you focus on in your practise? I know some things because i own the Jamie Vendera book "Raise Your Voice 2" but there is especially one thing that i am curious about that is not apparent or at least not so explicit in that book: Vowel modifications up in the high range for a "chesty" heavy metal singer.

A siren for all vowels from like C3 to a F5, for a "chesty" hard rock singer, what does it look like? I know this is alot to ask for and maybe i will have to buy a book that handles those questions. What book in that case?

Sorry for my bad english, i hope my message came through.

Thanx in advance/ Ola

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for the most part, vowel modications are not really specific to any genre. i've actually asked jaime vendera that same question, why did he not go into much detail about vowel modifications in his book. (most books really don't do into this topic in great detail.)

some teachers feel that vowel modifications come about instinctively and naturally and shouldn't be coaxed, and others feel it really cannot be fully understood without actual one-one-vocal lessons.

also, once vowel modifications are taught or realized, the singer needs to take those basic modifications and apply shades of them and experiment with them for the best combination of resonance and minimized effort per their particular voice. no teacher can do that for you and that is something that will come in time.

rob lunte and ken tamplin are strong in this subject. i haven't ran across a super great book about vowel modification.

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Ok, Bob, there actually is a sectíon of vowel modification in Jamie´s book but it´s not very comprehensive. It´s not specific to any genre you say but I saw somewhere that if you sing hard rock you don´t need any vowel modification, is that true?

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Ok, Bob, there actually is a sectíon of vowel modification in Jamie´s book but it´s not very comprehensive. It´s not specific to any genre you say but I saw somewhere that if you sing hard rock you don´t need any vowel modification, is that true?

olem, although there are always exceptions to the rule, "no" it is not true. as you work up into the higher areas of the voice, some kind of vowel shading needs to be made. whether the singer is aware of it or not is the question.

in fact, it's vowel modification that enable the passage into (and out of ) the higher notes. but it is subtle. i've learned with appoggio-trained singers it's even less apparant but it occurs.

some singers are so skilled that you can be hard pressed to think they aren't, but they are.

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Olem - For some it comes natural, for most others we need to learn it. The way we speak our vowels is what comes easy to us. But as you ascend into higher ranges, the spoken vowels just plain don't work well - no matter what genre. In fact, if you try to force the spoken vowel up high you can cause pain and injury as your body tries to accomodate an inefficient vocal tract.

Now, some spoken vowels work really well in higher ranges, and thats why we "modify" towards those vowels.

Maybe guys like Steve Perry who's speaking range is pretty high, can sing in a higher range easier because they are just used to the vocal track configurations that work in the higher range. But, we can all learn how to modify the vocal tract to support higher ranges. It's just a little weird at first because it isn't what we are used to. It takes a long time before these vocal tract configurations become 2nd nature. We're training our muscles to work in ways that don't feel natural at first.

All this goes hand in hand with thinning out the folds as you go up. It makes the whole thing a bit tricky to learn. But it can be done.

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According to steven, the resident classical singing expert, dio uses quite classical vowels, unusually so for that genre.

Thanks for posting the tremendous examples. Dio certainly has a very easy, and powerfully-connected headvoice. I see why he is admired.

In classical singing, there is a term 'voce piena in testa' - Italian, which means 'full voice in the head'. I think Dio provides some very good examples of what this sounds like when applied to this genre.

What I find very remarkable is his vowel shaping. Though he does not go as far as a classical singer would in making the vowels 'tall' in the mouth, he does go quite farther than other rock singers I have heard. The resulting tone, while still having 'cut' to it, makes a fuller quality which I liked.

http://themodernvocalist.punbb-hosting.com/viewtopic.php?id=126

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Excellent responses, here. And I would agree with all of them. And echo a process from Anthony Frisell. To return to the italian vowels, first. But I also agree with Bob. Where in, particular vowel shade works well for one, another for another person, and so on.

First off, decided what you hearing. And is it what you want to hear. If the vowel sounds boomy or meaty, that might be the vowel for you. But first, you have to decide on what you are hearing and that is mental.

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Ok, thanx for responses Bob, Geno, Matt and Ron. I have thought for a long time to get Tamplin´s product, i think my approach will benefit from it. Interesting view there about Dio, Matt.

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