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a baritone can't sing F!

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seth123
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i am a baritone.from B flat to D is my passaggio. When i hit E flat,i feel the secondo passaggio is there and i can cover the E flat and E. the problem is: i only can hit F above middle C . i never hit higher than F! the F is also difficult for me! :(

i know some people also struggle with this problem for many years. for example, a tenor can not sing A=440 :(

what should i do?

thank you!

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I'm a little confused, Seth. You said you are a baritone with a top end of F4 (american notation. I think that's F1 in european, n'est pas?)

And yes, I would consider 440 A to be a tenor note. So, are you trying to change to tenor or have some countertenor in your baritone pallete?

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Thanks, Jens. I know you have classed yourself, fach-wise, as a baritone but I have heard you whistle register in the 6th octave (american notation) and a few notes higher, even.

Me, I've got limits. I have strengthen and consolidated my dynamics and find that I have a range of E3 to Bb5, going down to C3 if I include lower volume low notes and down to A2 (in the morning) on spoken notes. (I guess it depends on what one defines as usable.) In some systems, any sound is usable, in others, only stage volume with articulation is considered usable. And I think that depends on genre. I've heard Bob Seger make a sound that's not part of any singing system but it worked for the song ("Love to watch her Strut.")

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I agree with others. The best way to stop using vocal fry is to stop using it. I know that sounds cheeky. It's not meant to be.

But it does remind me of a joke. I went to the doctor and said, "It hurts when I move my arm this high."

The doctor said, "Well, quit doing that."

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I'm a tenor and I @#$%ing hate singing in F. A is meh--depends what the high notes are and how long they are, although the note of A is technically above my passagio enough so that it isn't too hard to hit. The actual note of F is OK, though. G# is where it tends to fall apart for me, though.

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Hey, another Seth!

Anywhoo, hang in there. My highest notes were below E4 before I started training. Now I can sing up to A4 in a very chesty sound, and well beyond that in "metal-land". It takes time, and the right exercises. That said, I used to only be able to hit F#s in very loud belty ways, but now I can do it much more softly. I've also been told I'm a baritone, and a bass... and also a tenor... Bass by a classically trained teacher, Tenor by an SLS one, and Baritone by my current teacher, who is of the Jaimie Vendera schooling.

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I am a baritone.from B flat to D is my passaggio. When i hit E flat,i feel the secondo passaggio is there and i can cover the E flat and E. the problem is: i only can hit F above middle C . i never hit higher than F! the F is also difficult for me! :(

what should i do?

seth123: Welcome to the TMV Forum.

The technique is to let the vocal fold mass thin as the scale is ascended. There are two kinds of exercises which are very helpful for discovering and becoming familiar with the sensations involved: Exercises using vowels which have low passaggii, and exercises usind semi-occluded voiced consonants.

'The passaggio' is not just at one pitch level... the note of its lower entry varies by vowel. EE and OO have the lowest, Eh, Ih and Ay have mid, and Ah has highest. As you sing the ascending scale or arpeggio through the middle voice, if you do not modify the vowel (either by dropping the jaw, moving the tongue, changing the embourchure or changing larynx height) the vowels with low passaggios will enable you to 'come out the topside' or 'roll over' into head voice at a lower pitch than the other vowels do.

For example, if you sing the arpeggio-vowel combination C3-Ah, E3-Ah, G3-Ah, C4-EE without crescendo, when you get to the C4 you will be very close, if not already in head voice. Transpose upward by semitones.

Doing this exercise, you will experience the laryngeal and support sensations that accompany the head voice tones.

Similarly, doing sirens on semi-occluded voiced consonants is a big help in learning this new coordination. These consonants are V, Z, voiced TH, French J (as in je), M, N and NG. Sirens on any of these, which transition into the upper middle voice, will cause a reflexive lightening of the registration as you proceed upward, and you will be able to siren right up past the F.

I hope this helps.

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you need to just keep practicing without that covering. I have worked with countless numbers of singers who have the same problem and its usually because they let go to much. Or because they start covering and tweaking something in their throat. Once you CAN let go into headvoice start holding it together just dont get to loud or breathy, drop that jaw and go for it. so hard to explain real quick but you need to practice like you sing. :D

daniel

www.danielformicavocalstudio.com

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i can't think of a better way to "feel" your way up to, and down from head voice than the "ng" or the "v" or the lip bubble sirens. this is part of my vocal therapy. as long as you don't lose the body connection and stay connected throughout. you don't even have to worry about specific notes...just let lose and go up and down, up and down, up and down.

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Bob, I really like your reference to "body connection". We don't talk a lot about it... like "twang" or "open throat" or "etc.", but it is hugely important figuring out how to get the sensation of good breath management and what it feels like throughout the scale... from low to high. Done right and it feels pretty much.. even... throughout. IMO it is as important as all the more talked about areas. Yet they all have to be there, synchronized, or none of them works properly.. or more nuanced.. efficiently.

I've had a few glasses of wine and feel a little philosophical at the moment. :P

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Bob, I really like your reference to "body connection". We don't talk a lot about it... like "twang" or "open throat" or "etc.", but it is hugely important figuring out how to get the sensation of good breath management and what it feels like throughout the scale... from low to high. Done right and it feels pretty much.. even... throughout. IMO it is as important as all the more talked about areas. Yet they all have to be there, synchronized, or none of them works properly.. or more nuanced.. efficiently.

I've had a few glasses of wine and feel a little philosophical at the moment. :P

i've really gone deep into this appoggio technique. the whole body does the singing, the throat is passive.

easier said than done though....lol!!! enjoy your wine, but watch the alcohol intake, dries out the folds.

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i've really gone deep into this appoggio technique. the whole body does the singing, the throat is passive.

easier said than done though....lol!!! enjoy your wine, but watch the alcohol intake, dries out the folds.

And a chorus of angels sing, "Amen!"

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I learned to reach notes like tenor c (doesn't sound very good though), with this method. I am a baritone, and my hard "baritone notes" are F# to G#.

But, try those exercises, mabye you should look from his video 1 :)

may i just offer my 2 cents?

that exercise he's doing is great, but i would definitely recommend someone teach you that exercise on skype or in-person.

if you constrict with the tongue or throat going up the scale with that cry, or cry too chesty without releasing into head register (which is easy to do) you're asking for trouble.

contact tony. he charges very little for a consultation and would get you off on the right track.

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