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2nd Passagio or bridge

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Keith
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I have gotten the passgio cleaned up, but I wonder.... IS there a second passagio or bridge around c5 or b4 or somewhere in there? I seem to hit a wall there that I can't get past. Is it possible I am still pulling chest there? And when I do get to c5, I really have to force it. I hope that this isn't a stupid question or one that has been answered a dozen times!

~Keith

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keith as you go up you need to modify a little up there to release. for me as a tenor, it's b4.

let's say for example you're going up the scale on "ah"...depending on the singer, you need to shade more towards an "uh." for others more towards "oo."

when it first happened to me i was surprised...it takes a little getting used to...but when you hit on it just right you will know it because you'll sense it's right by the way it sort of slots in.

a release occurs that allows the sound to travel up into the head cavities.

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Keith - Those are little roadblocks that occur as you go higher. They happened to me, and I still get it once in a while if I'm tired, or not concentrating. Most likely it is this - you've figured out how to thin your folds enough to get you to C5, but they need to be thinner to go higher. The trick, and it takes practice, is to get progressively thinner as you go up as opposed to a fixed thickness. Try the "ng" siren, not loud, but with consistent breath pressure, and see if you can't go past C5 with the siren.

It's like gears on a bike - you are in one gear, and to go faster you need to switch gears. But with the voice, we can eliminate the gears altogether and go to a variable spead drive where you are constantly changing the torque depending on pitch.

A great tip that Steven gave me to overcome this is when going higher think "smaller" like you are going to a smaller place when going higher. It may not be the power you need yet, but it helps to overcome this roadblock.

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keith stop thinking there is something there and you will be fine. :D

daniel

www.danielformicavocalstudio.com

SO here I am doing sirens. I usually do octave sirens, on "EE to EH". When I get to the top of the octave, I recite the italian vowels(EH EE AH OH OOOOOO) then siren back down. I do this because I am practicing vowel modification. But when I try and go past C5 /D5 nothing but air comes out. I can sometimes get the D above C5, but most of the time, nothing but air. I can't do a transcending tone on these notes either because of this problem. Maybe I should back off and only go up to A for a few days and see if the problem works itself out lol.

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SO here I am doing sirens. I usually do octave sirens, on "EE to EH". When I get to the top of the octave, I recite the italian vowels(EH EE AH OH OOOOOO) then siren back down. I do this because I am practicing vowel modification. But when I try and go past C5 /D5 nothing but air comes out. I can sometimes get the D above C5, but most of the time, nothing but air. I can't do a transcending tone on these notes either because of this problem. Maybe I should back off and only go up to A for a few days and see if the problem works itself out lol.

Keith: CVT should invent a vocal mode for this: NBA (Nothing But Air).

Seriously, this situation is about 2 things: maintaining consistent adduction, and not overblowing. An NBA sound comes when the muscle actions are out-of-balance.

In that range, there are acoustic differences in the voice that make it feel different, but if you 'try' to do things much differently with the vowel, you must make sure that you do not change the basic set-up.

To explore this, change the siren to a semi-occluded consonant (Z or V should be fine for now) and do not open to a vowel at the top for now. The idea of the exercise is to connect the phonation to what you do below. As Geno said, its going to feel small at first, because of the acoustic changes, but that happens automatically... when you are trying to keep things the same.

The key for the Z and the V will be in the vowel you put behind them. Both of those consonants can be done with the tongue in the position for all the other vowels. Try it. With a little thought, and a little experimentation in the middle of your range, you can do it. Find out how to do the V and the Z with an UH (as in 'up') behind it. For purposes of discussion, lets call this a Z with an UH behind it.

Yes, it will feel strange to do, but that will put your throat in a posture that you can use to start.

Siren for a few days in your most comfortable octaves to get used to these feelings, and then begin to siren higher as things become more familiar. The sirens you do up high should be casual... don't drive them hard, just kind of throw them off as if you did not care so much... the attitude is not to 'hold them down', but (as someone said) to 'release' it... Like doves at the Olympics.

When you have this incorporated into your voice some, you can return to adding vowels to the higher side of the slide. However, for the time being, only use UH when you open. I recommend beginning on Ab3 sliding to Ab4. Siren up, and then open the consonant to UH with a smooth small motion. As you are opening to the vowel, drop your jaw slowly until you feel the tone 'appear'. That will be exactly the right pronunciation for that note/vowel combination.

Transpose upward by 1/2 step, and repeat, again dropping the jaw until the note pops into place. Repeat.

Using this approach, you will discover the lighter registration and adduction in the notes below the C that will set you up for the C and above.

I hope this is helpful.

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Steve I just did 8 of those Z with an uh behind it sirens - I found that when I was doing them, I felt an automatic "adjustment" in my larnyx - felt like it lowered slightly and pushed out just a little - I did however try and restrict airflow by concentrating on doing a Z with my mouth almost closed.. I blow way to much air and when I restrict the airflow, the adjustment happens and it feels like c5 is pretty easy... Is that the goal here to limit the airflow and help the larnyx adjustment to be automatic? Or did I screw up the siren by limiting my air flow?

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Steve I just did 8 of those Z with an uh behind it sirens - I found that when I was doing them, I felt an automatic "adjustment" in my larnyx - felt like it lowered slightly and pushed out just a little - I did however try and restrict airflow by concentrating on doing a Z with my mouth almost closed.. I blow way to much air and when I restrict the airflow, the adjustment happens and it feels like c5 is pretty easy... Is that the goal here to limit the airflow and help the larnyx adjustment to be automatic? Or did I screw up the siren by limiting my air flow?

Keith: You did it right.

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Some have called it a 2nd passaggio but essentially, there is a tonal shift around the C5 or D5 area, depending on one's physical construction. Notes after that need increasingly smaller spaces and at the top, a vowels sound the same because not only does one not have the proximity for articulation, but the harmonics that creat vowel sounds cannot be reinforced. The space available is soaked up just to create dominant frequency.

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