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Maybe I'm not the worst singer on the planet....ANYMORE!!!

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goldy
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Well after my 7th vocal lesson people are telling me I'm definately making progress. having one of the best vocal coaches certainly has something to do with that. here's an article she just wrote that I found quite interesting about vocal warm ups. Does anyone out there go thru any warm ups before they perform? http://ezinearticles.com/?Singing-Exercises-Are-the-Push-Ups-of-Voice-Training&id=6681982

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Well after my 7th vocal lesson people are telling me I'm definately making progress. having one of the best vocal coaches certainly has something to do with that. here's an article she just wrote that I found quite interesting about vocal warm ups. Does anyone out there go thru any warm ups before they perform? http://ezinearticles.com/?Singing-Exercises-Are-the-Push-Ups-of-Voice-Training&id=6681982

goldy54: Yes, I've been doing vocal warm-ups before performances for my entire career.

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I do warmups throughout the whole day when I'm about to perform in the evening. From humming in my comfortable range to more edgy sounds up in the scale. That's the way to go:)

What do you mean by edgy sounds up in the scale?

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I do lip bubbles a TON during the day - sirens and arpeggios.

I never did get that... but I see and hear it all the time. I thought you had to have some horse genes to do that.LOL I guess that will come soon in my vocal lessons. Thanks so much for your input!

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I never did get that... but I see and hear it all the time. I thought you had to have some horse genes to do that.LOL I guess that will come soon in my vocal lessons. Thanks so much for your input!

Hey Keith, Just curious... I'm originally from Queens, then Long Island and all over the country until I ended up in Nashville. Where is Dryden?

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You can warm-up any time. Certainly advisable before working on some songs or some new techniques. My warm-ups are are descending sirens in falsetto, gradually changing through messa di voce to fuller volume and tone. Analogous to to a runner gently stretching a smidge farther each time instead of just starting out in a sprint. I don't do warm-ups simply as a customary thing but with a purpose in mind. The warm-up is to engage successively and successfully to work on coordination and, most importantly, to me, translate proper use of folds, resonance, and air pressure into a song. That is, I am not an accomplished scale practicioner. My aim is to be an accomplished singer. Of songs.

Certainly, there are going to be young'ns out there who can't wait to launch into "Still of the Night" by Whitesnake. And impatience is often a sign of youth. But getting the basics down is always a path to success. Another analogy. Most young guys like to play sports. But to play a sport well requires at least a little warm up and then practice on basics, whatever it is. Say baseball. First, practice catching. Then, later, pitching, though here may require some experimentation. Do you have a big arm without much accuracy? You will be better suited to the outfield, where you need to throw high and long. But, from 50 feet away, can you part the hair on the head of a gnat? Then, you might be a pitcher. Even though there are fast-throwing pitchers, the position actually requires accuracy, above all. Then, there is translating talents into what you can do.

Are there situations where you might do something without warming up? Sure. I am reminded of martial arts. The idea of practice is to make a habit of something. In self-defense against an attacker, you won't have time to do all of you gymnastic warm-ups. But the continuing practice otherwise of limbering and practicing means that you are already in better tone and reflex than without it. Same with singing, to an extent, though singing is about coordination more than it's about strong muscles.

And I have drifted. But yes, warm-up, but warm-up in a way that keeps your voice healthy and relaxed. Tension creep is a voice-killer.

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I never did get that... but I see and hear it all the time. I thought you had to have some horse genes to do that.LOL I guess that will come soon in my vocal lessons. Thanks so much for your input!

goldy, lip bubbles are one of my all-time favorites. they're also what i need to do with my voice therapist to help shrink my polyp.

lately, i just do lip bubbles whenever (if ever) i feel i may have raised my voice too much, or i have spoken too long. or as keith said, you can do them whenever you feel like it.

it's a great warm down too!!

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Lip bubbles are a great way to get the feeling of "being connected" - great way to warm up. I usually start doing them in the shower. Then throught the day concentrating on the passagio area. So, I do c4 to c5 on a good day, or on a bad day a few notes lower - maybe start on A. I am a law student, so I am almost always home so I don't bug anyone lol. No fellow co workers to deal with....

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You can warm-up any time. Certainly advisable before working on some songs or some new techniques. My warm-ups are are descending sirens in falsetto, gradually changing through messa di voce to fuller volume and tone. Analogous to to a runner gently stretching a smidge farther each time instead of just starting out in a sprint. I don't do warm-ups simply as a customary thing but with a purpose in mind. The warm-up is to engage successively and successfully to work on coordination and, most importantly, to me, translate proper use of folds, resonance, and air pressure into a song. That is, I am not an accomplished scale practicioner. My aim is to be an accomplished singer. Of songs.

Certainly, there are going to be young'ns out there who can't wait to launch into "Still of the Night" by Whitesnake. And impatience is often a sign of youth. But getting the basics down is always a path to success. Another analogy. Most young guys like to play sports. But to play a sport well requires at least a little warm up and then practice on basics, whatever it is. Say baseball. First, practice catching. Then, later, pitching, though here may require some experimentation. Do you have a big arm without much accuracy? You will be better suited to the outfield, where you need to throw high and long. But, from 50 feet away, can you part the hair on the head of a gnat? Then, you might be a pitcher. Even though there are fast-throwing pitchers, the position actually requires accuracy, above all. Then, there is translating talents into what you can do.

Are there situations where you might do something without warming up? Sure. I am reminded of martial arts. The idea of practice is to make a habit of something. In self-defense against an attacker, you won't have time to do all of you gymnastic warm-ups. But the continuing practice otherwise of limbering and practicing means that you are already in better tone and reflex than without it. Same with singing, to an extent, though singing is about coordination more than it's about strong muscles.

And I have drifted. But yes, warm-up, but warm-up in a way that keeps your voice healthy and relaxed. Tension creep is a voice-killer.

Great info. Apparently you and my voice coach are on the same page. Thanks for your response! http://ezinearticles.com/?Singing-Exercises-Are-the-Push-Ups-of-Voice-Training&id=6681982

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Thanks, Goldy. And let me quote our very own Steven Fraser, in so many words. I paraphrase but, essentially, 30 minutes of the right practice is better than 1 or 2 hours of the wrong practice.

The object, to me, of practice and warm-ups is not the perfection of practice and warm-ups, but the perfection of the voice in song.

I am not a vocal professional, though I did stay at a Holiday Inn Select. :D

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Thanks, Goldy. And let me quote our very own Steven Fraser, in so many words. I paraphrase but, essentially, 30 minutes of the right practice is better than 1 or 2 hours of the wrong practice.

The object, to me, of practice and warm-ups is not the perfection of practice and warm-ups, but the perfection of the voice in song.

I am not a vocal professional, though I did stay at a Holiday Inn Select. :D

Very funny! Let me know when you "play" at a Holiday Inn Select. I'll bring my entourage to cheer you on!!!

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