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How to improve pitch accuracy?

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EvilSoup
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I've been quite frustrated recently because I'm trying to improve my pitch accuracy, but it isn't improving.

I play a few instruments and I have a good ear. I know when I'm pitchy, that doesn't seem to help me though.

My pitch also wavers and often goes sharp or flat at the end of notes.

It's also hard to sing a line that has a few words on the same pitch. Some words I bend sharp, others I bend flat.

I'm pretty poor at singing quick riffs accurately.

My tone is quite good I think, but the lack of pitch consistency in my voice is just too distracting.

I have a soundcloud with songs on it, though you should know that I only put the good takes on there. You can still hear the problem, but it is much worse live. Some songs are harder to sing in tune than others, and sometimes even simple songs are really hard for me to sing well in tune.

The singers I like and listen to are often pitchy themselves, but I feel like I'm still too inconsistent even for the type of singing I want to do.

Is there any advice you guys can give me?

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Do you hear the tone in your head before you sing it?

Yeah, well kinda. Not super vividly.

I'm hitting the right notes, I just sometimes hit them a bit too flat or sharp.

I know it isn't the right pitch when I'm singing it, it just comes out that way.

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Ok, I listened to the fiirst 2 songs, and they were amazing. I thing you have a very unique voice and don't hear any issues with it. One time in the first song I hear you slide to a note - sounds like you did it on pupose..... If you didn't, it still sounded great. Great voice man.

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I agree with Keith, you did sound good in the recording I listened to (the Radiohead one). It's just when you went to the higher parts where you sounded off. I'd say it's just an issue of practice. Support may be an issue too. I've noticed that my pitch control in my headtones is weaker than it my chest voice. I am just better at singing in chest, it makes sense.

It's interesting that you said the singers you like are pitchy, how about trying listening to some that aren't? I use to listen to a lot of Neil Young, but I don't really anymore. My tastes have just moved towards stronger vocalists as my interests moved towards my becoming one.

That said, don't force yourself to listen to singers you don't like, but do try branching out. For example, if you like Radiohead you may like the band Ours who has Jimmy Gnecco as a singer. Their first album Distorted Lullabies is awesome. I've really liked that band as of recently. Jeff Buckley is another good choice for that style. They are falsetoey, yes, but definitely accurate intonators. Great full voice singing too.

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Jeff Buckley is another good choice for that style. They are falsetoey, yes, but definitely accurate intonators. Great full voice singing too.

Love Jeff Buckley.

I do wonder if poor pitch intonation has rubbed off on me from listening to a lot of Radiohead, Coldplay, Death Cab For Cutie, Wilco, The Flaming Lips, and The Smashing Pumpkins. :lol:

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First of all - it sounds really great. You don't really have a pitch issue at all. Yes, I would say that listening to coldplay is rubbing off as that slight pitchiness is almost promoted and part of the style. You're right I beleive that is from a lack of consistent support. That style doesn't exactly exude great vocal technique. It sounds nice, but it is "off the breath" and generally not well supported. Why don't you work on the support and technique and bring this genre to a new level of competence. You've got the style down really well and you could blow away these singers if you want to. It sounds like you're singing exactly in that style. You should break away and create something even better. The fact that the slight pitchiness is bothering you (even though it is totally in the style) may give you the motivation to excel and go beyond.

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Let me tell you what I used to do that I think works awesome. 2 things you can do. If you have any instruments at all, guitar keyboard, harmonica, whatever,

play a note on it and hum that note at the same time, but try holding the note for a while, or plug a mic into a guitar tuner and hum a note, focusing on humming the note exactly in pitch. Then continue to hold it for a bit without letting the pitch waver.

After that, make it more of a challenge. I have noticed in my experience, that some people, when they sing, tend to get pitchy when they raise or lower the volume of their singing. For instance, when someone sings a part louder, they tend to sharpen the note, likewise when singing it softer, tend to lower the pitch.

So whilst you have the tuner out, practice changing the volume of the note while holding it, and try to keep the pitch the same.

To some people, this sounds easy. I assure you it is not easy, al least not at first. This is tough to master, but like I said in another post,

technique is very important. I had also said that when someone sings, does it really make you cry from all the emotion of the song if the singer is off pitch or tone deaf?

You help to make my point, which is that someone who truly desires to be a great singer/vocalist, is always looking for ways to improve his/her technique.

We are our own quality control.

Sort of like when I write new stuff, I write beyond my ability to play and sing, forcing myself to get better, thus improving my technique in all areas.

Anyway, hope I helped.

have a good day.

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Your singing sounds a bit wimpy. You need to support more. It sounds like you are just leisurely singing along. You need to push, Nancy, push. :lol::P

If you don't have good support you will be weak and pitchy. I went through the same thing. I had to relearn how to sing with good support (aka power) before I started sounding halfway decent. This doesn't mean sing as LOUDLY as possible. Keep the air pressure normal in your throat -- don't blow your voice out, but really push with your support. Sing with reckless abandon while keeping the volume at a reasonable level. Practice makes perfect.

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Your singing sounds a bit wimpy. You need to support more. It sounds like you are just leisurely singing along. You need to push, Nancy, push. :lol::P

If you don't have good support you will be weak and pitchy. I went through the same thing. I had to relearn how to sing with good support (aka power) before I started sounding halfway decent. This doesn't mean sing as LOUDLY as possible. Keep the air pressure normal in your throat -- don't blow your voice out,

. Sing with reckless abandon while keeping the volume at a reasonable level. Practice makes perfect.

nc, uh.....no sir.

nothing should ever, ever be pushed. strongly supported, yes.....pushed, never.

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. Sing with reckless abandon while keeping the volume at a reasonable level. Practice makes perfect.

nc, uh.....no sir.

nothing should ever, ever be pushed. strongly supported, yes.....pushed, never.

And just what are you defining as pushing? If you want the tone you've gotta give it your all. Singing without pushing is just leisurely singing and will sound wimpy on a recording, just as as I was describing in my response to this thread.

If you mean push as in psh with your throat, or yelling, then you're right, that sort of "pushing" shouldn't be done. But pushing implies that something is forcefully moving something in a direction, and I thought it made sense that the pushing would be done from the diaphragm, as it would be pushing the air up.

I run into musicians arguing over terminology on guitar forums, and if they would actually sit down and examine each other's arguments more carefully, they'd realize that they're just using different wording to describe the same thing. I think this sort of thing happens even more frequently when talking about singing. So no, I'm not advocating damaging one's vocal cords.

I do think that when recording, one should sing with enough oomph that after 4-5 takes they CANNOT deliver a good take because their cords are just worn out. Ymmv.

Now where is the "stirring the pot" emoticon?

:P

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