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pharyngeal voice clarification

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dr rock
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based on my gathering of information and research on the pharyngeal voice

i am currently at the conclusion that it is THE twang mode for your head register when you torqe and press into it

and its created by a slightly higher larynx

which is an aggressive and powerful way to use the head voice which cuts...

if im wrong i need some of you broskies to correct me haha

cause i dont know about the chest notes, because i know you can achieve a good twang by placing the sound in the resonators for chest tones like how the the 4 pillars of singing set and release method works

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yes most people would categorize pharyngeal voice and twang as the same thing and although i would say very, very similar i would not say they are the exact same thing. if you take an exaggerated "nasty" "metallic" "twangy" word like NAY or NAH up a scale and see how that feels. then hum on a MMm but add a "creaky" "moany" "whimper" like quality to it and take it up a scale and note how it feels. lastly produce the sound NG like the end of the word HUNG legato (sliding) up a scale. the NG is a pharyngeal voice exercise and it kind of feels like a mix between the pure twang exercise and the creak one. i find with the pure twang one that my larynx is higher which generally requires more stamina (for greater support and use of laryngeal elevators) and thus is more fatiguing.

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Dr. Rock:

Yes, in order to get compression or "connectivity" in the head voice for the "cut" your referring to... you need to calibrate and practice your "twang configurations". It is a technique we are advancing at The Vocalist Studio and getting great results. However, I would say that you do not get great twang by placing sound in the resonators... Twang is not a "Pillar III" issue (resonation), it is a "Pillar II" issue (phonation). Its about changing the physiology of your larynx. The results of the twang vocal mode, is processed in the resonators.

Do you a copy of "Pillars"?

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thanks a lot for the information Center, it really helps

yes Robert i have the 4 pillars of singing

yeah that makes sense now, cause on the first buzzing exersise

i was wondering if the buzzing was created by the sound being placed in the resonators

but now i get the idea that its produced in pillar 2 and the resonators enhance it

so the brassy buzzing sound/feeling in that buzzhumming exersise starts before it hits the resonators? cause you also show how to not do it with that hollow humming sound.

if thats the case, then i now know what i was doing wrong, which was pushing the sound into the resonators and trying to get a buzz comming from that instead of feeling it before.

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Martin, yes that old chestnut, as they say ;)

the NG is a unfinished sound, meaning you wouldnt use that exact same coordination/sound for singing as it is indeed going in and out the nose. you use it to "wake up" or coordinate the useful aspects that you can then apply to singing. it does "wake up" the nasal cavity resonance (not to be confused with singing out the nose-you dont use that bit of it in application), which also feels very prominant to me in pure twang, but also, similar to pure twang, seems/feels to help with coordinating a narrowing in the pharynx though i have no idea if its in the exact same place on the pharyngeal wall as pure twang. to be honest i thinks its more a terminology thing. what im calling pure twang is obviously a pharyngeal sound, it just seems an extreme version of the pharyngeal voice im describing. i think one difference is that the NG employs adduction using the thin edges of the folds.

i will re-post that vid of the woman using an applied pharyngeal voice. they make a point in the info side bar that there is " Little or no evidence of twanging on this segment." but maybe once again this is the terminology factor coming into play.

but going back to the original poster i think a better question would be "how do i get "cut" "ring" squillo" in my tone? as that is essentially what is being asked in a round about way

and their is more than one answer/technique to answer that!

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thanks a lot for the information Center, it really helps

yes Robert i have the 4 pillars of singing

yeah that makes sense now, cause on the first buzzing exersise

i was wondering if the buzzing was created by the sound being placed in the resonators

but now i get the idea that its produced in pillar 2 and the resonators enhance it

so the brassy buzzing sound/feeling in that buzzhumming exersise starts before it hits the resonators? cause you also show how to not do it with that hollow humming sound.

if thats the case, then i now know what i was doing wrong, which was pushing the sound into the resonators and trying to get a buzz comming from that instead of feeling it before.

A few clarifications... I show the "hollow/whoofy" form of humming as the example of what NOT to do... Also, lets try to use proper talk track here. "buzzing" is ok, "laying resonant track" is better,... but "semi-occulations" are what they are really referred to in the research community. Glad its helping, truly the best way to confirm and fine tune your techniques is to schedule a couple internet lessons so I can hear and see what your doing. It really pays off. www.thevocaliststudio.com/internetlessons

Stay close to this forum, there are a lot of smart people here.

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yeah the buzzing is comming along pretty good, a little trouble bridging to the passagio but whenever i feel

the need to push i react by letting go more, and once i get fully into the head its all good

yeah Robert id totally be intrested in an internet lesson but right now i dont have the materials nessasary to do that

but when i get em ill get ahold of you bro.

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dude, no offence but i dont know what twang you have been listening too!

to me the steroetypical twang is a sharp, piecing sound such as .....

male using twang in speech

female making twang sound and then singing a little in twang (not all of the singing is twanged though). starting at 0:30

the singer Anastasia uses the twang sound a lot! (the woman in the above clip was even singing a Anastacia song to demonstrate twang) the twang begins at 0:40 and continues for the rest of the song pretty much.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bPF0hpaWD18

the singer Midnight (R.I.P) from the metal band Crimson Glory used to use some twang.

Axl Rose from Guns N Roses often uses a twangy sound

hope that helps.

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Centre...my attempt at humor failed:)

Here goes:

http://www.punbb-hosting.com/forums/themodernvocalist/viewtopic.php?id=105

http://www.punbb-hosting.com/forums/themodernvocalist/viewtopic.php?id=79

My fav from the professor himself:

Without debating pharyngeal vs. pure twang(has been done ad nauseum):

I think one could agree that Jim Carrey's "annoying sound" contains(among other things) narrowing of the epiglottic funnel(twang.)

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Interesting... all this interest in twang now... Folks, twang can have different kinds of sounds to it because it is a vocal mode that is calibrated. There are different degrees of twang depending on how much contraction you put into the mechanism. Think of it as a meter from 1-10 and the goal is to be able to sing at any calibration.

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Robert,

My "light-hearted" too "subtle" point, in response to VIDEO's youtube request, was that if you type in twang in the search field...you will get pages of "twang" talk. AND...an absurd amount of twang examples.

In fact...it was Centre's very own thread(http://www.punbb-hosting.com/forums/themodernvocalist/viewtopic.php?id=105), that was mentioned on another forum, that led me to this great site!

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analog, sorry there dude obviously had my serious cap on there too long or something.

videohere, axle rose definitely used twang for pretty much the entirety of the sweet child o mine song. what i call a pure twang sound (more like what axl in the clip and certainly what anastacia uses) does indeed sound very dissimilar from your natural tone (just listen to the her "normal" voice at the beginning of the song in contrast to the rest) but then its not something you have to do in this way in my opinion. you can do it that way if you want to but personally i find it fatiguing . doing exercises which this qulaity can be helpful though. there are various sounds that sometimes fall under the banner of "twang" that may be as Robert said, a slightly less intense version of what im describing as pure twang or they may be different coordintaions. dont think anyone is 100% sure to be honest on that. for instance some singing techniques would describe the "ring" you her in an operatic voice as twang although is sounds nothing like the "pure twang" examples i posted.

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thanks folks....so twang essentially is an unnatural voice not one's true voice or vocal timbre somewhat of an artificial sound?

i'm thinking then that the late comedian paul lynde used twang. would that be right? axle rose too? please confirm.

Bob, twang is just as natural as any other vocal mode. There are several vocal modes that are natural, one of them being speech, which is most FAMILIAR to us... Twang just happens to be an important vocal mode that tends to be a big part of getting head tones to "connect".

If I may say so, I think Im the first person on these forums to really come out and make this point... now talk of twang is all the rage... wait until you actually learn how to do it with proper formant, ... then you will know you have achieved something great.

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thanks folks....so twang essentially is an unnatural voice not one's true voice or vocal timbre somewhat of an artificial sound?

i'm thinking then that the late comedian paul lynde used twang. would that be right? axle rose too? please confirm.

ion...

Videohere: Advice when discussing vocal tone: Avoid the use of the words 'natural' and 'unnatural'. Twang is one of the things that the voice can do, speaking or singing. In some cultures, its very common to hear _everybody_ doing it.

Yes, IMO Paul Linde used what we would call 'twang'. This type of vocalism allows the voice to carry well in non-amplfied situations, and is also sustainable over long time... a concert or a career.

For other examples of this sort of vocalism... look no farther than the broadway stage. Even today's artists use it for speaking and singing, whether a show is amplified or not.

And, as some have said, even operatic voices have twang, just done with a different vowel balance. If a twangy vocal production is sung through vowels with low first formants, the Italian chiarroscurro results.... voices that are both very dark and also bright.

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OK I finally have found time to click on links illustrating what everyone here is referring to as "twang". Being in Nashville, I have heard way too much of what I define as excessive "twang" by people coming from other genres trying to sing country. I think one of the best correct uses of a lot of twang is by Jennifer Nettles of Sugarland. I believe it's the same vocal effect used by axle rose. However, I understand she has had vocal problems, and I do believe there is a way for her to do what she does without that vocal fatigue and strain being allowed to set in. The epiglottic funnel may narrow, but fatiging throat tightness in twang (if this is the same thing you're referring to) is, I believe, totally unnecessary. Willie Nelson, Bob Dylan, Alicia Keys (chorus of "Fallin", etc http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j6_Tqo44xI4&feature=player_embedded) are also examples of very twangy voices, right?

I get this edge in my singers by suggesting they use a bratty voice. I use the "a" (cat) sound as well, on a very bright and edgy siren. If someone needs more of what you are calling "twang" and I call "edge", I ask my singers to sound less "hooty" or hollow. I have them do short sirens with "n", "m" and "ng" using a "nerdy" and buzzy sound (other words I use which I think mean the same thing here.) But I make sure the jaw stays flexible when applying edge. This relaxes soft palate, of course.

The way I get the levels of twang to change to genre or song appropriate color is to give what I call the "blind man walks into a room" exercise. I suggest a blind man would touch both walls to find the middle of the room. The middle can be a little towards one wall or the other, but can be chosen when you know where the two boundary walls are. (Hope that makes sense). To find the middle, usable degree of the edge or buzzy vocal sound, I have the student sing a phrase in "back" of the throat in as nerdy, thin a sound possible. Then I have them sing it "forward" as hooty or hollowly as possible. Neither of these places will feel good to the throat. Then I ask them to find the middle of those sounds and sing it again. I may then suggest moving the sound back or forward and experiment with these choices until the sound feels right to the song and genre. All of a sudden, they find themselves with a lot more tone color choices available.

Is this what you're talking about? If so, I'd say the main caution with the twang is NOT to have engage throat grabbing or larynx freezing. Some may disagree, but I find that if the face is frozen, there will be range ceilings and floors much closer together. Eyes and jaw must be active and freely communicative. As far as this being tiring, in my opinion, anytime we fatigue the vocal cords or limit, we're doing something wrong. What say ye?

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Yup...in terms of AES/Twang you would have a "twang" knob from 0-10. 1 makes it necessary to produce tone and as you raise the knob(squeeze,) the more "distinct" the twang until you finally reach 10(would be sharp/piercing/penetrating/"cackle-like".)

11 would be "full distortion" i.e. only noise and no tone. (Insert Spinal Tap reference:))

That's my understanding at least.

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Robert Lunte has been evangelizing the 'Twang' vocal set for years starting with The Four Pillars of Screaming [now Singing]. I train with Pillars for over an hour six sometimes seven days a week and can do so without gripping. I Twang in a healthy manner [read to my understanding and experience, use of Twang vocal set is healthy. Twang referenced her is a vocal set [sometimes referred to as mode]. I am currently reading Gillyanne Kayes' 'Singing and the Actor'. I endorse any products from Gillyanne Kayes and Jeremy Fisher; this husband wife team offer wonderful insights into the science of vocalization. Gillyanne gives a clear explanation of Twang. She includes information I have not read anywhere else. Because of the copyright I will refrain from posting the pages here. However, I did find some information from Gillyanne and Jeremy's site to post. I appreciate each view and everyone sharing. I learn so very much from each of you.

http://www.vocalprocess.co.uk/resources … zine25.htm

"Let's talk twang

The human ear is tuned to hear specific harmonics more easily than others, although this can change with age. There are only a few truly simple sounds - a tuning fork or an oscilloscope, for example. Most sounds are complex, made up of a fundamental frequency (the one we hear) and a number of harmonics above (which contribute to the timbre of the sound). It is the particular balance of harmonics that tells our brain whether the same note is being played by a violin, an oboe or a trumpet.

A note in the human voice will normally contain harmonics up to several thousand cycles per second. By adding twang, the harmonics that sit between 2,500 and 4,000 cycles per second are boosted. This area of harmonics is often called the "singers' formant" and contributes to the "ring", "brilliance" or "squillo" in a voice.

In addition, each part of the human body has a resonating frequency of its own. Because of the shape and size of the ear canal, it vibrates in sympathy with resonances that sit between 2,500 and 4,000 cycles per second. So a twangy sound seems to 'sound' closer to your ear and therefore louder.

If you don't believe me, watch the men on a bus wince when a baby starts twanging!

I'm finishing with a challenge:

the next time you listen to a singer in any genre, listen out for whether the vocal volume is being made at vocal fold level (with a longer closed phase) or at vocal tract level (with added twang or tongue adjustments). You might be surprised..."

Enjoy this chart: http://www.vocalprocess.co.uk/resources … l_sets.pdf

Steven Fraser: a thousand thank yous for your priceless posts. Write a book and I will immediately purchase and read it.

Darrison N Bentheim-Murat: a thousand thank yous for your priceless posts. Write a book and I will immediately purchase and read it.

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Wel twanks for the info and links on Twanging i'm no clearer but what the hell i now know more about nothing than i have ever known but now i have a name for it now that's cool :cool:

Heeeeelp ha ha ha!:lol: who makes these names up "pharyngeal" "Twang" there must be a better and more social name for it like ......... dam i can't think of anything, any ideas people??

ciao

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Seventh Fear: the terminology will become familiar as you continue your vocal education. There is a danger of foregoing terminology and substituting one's own phrases. I agree, singing does not require a knowledge of vocabulary. However, unfortunately when vocal teachers fail to understand terminology they teach their clients things like, 'falsetto is your head voice' or 'when singing in your head voice you are using falsetto'. Rinse and repeat then imagine the frustration of paying $60 US dollars (plus) per hour for misinformation from a teacher that doesn't understand the science of voice to begin with.

You will find different pedagogies Singing Success, Speach Level Singing, The Vocalist Studio, Bel Canto, Complete Vocal Institute....use different terms. You can quickly determine a pedagogies influence by these terms (ie Compression - SLS, Passaggio - Bel Canto). At TVS we refer to these terms as the 'Talk Track'.

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