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Let's hear those head voices now! ;)

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Snax
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As the title says, I'd like to hear your head voices but not the heavy belting stuff. I'd love to hear the softer stuff that really shows control,range and emotion. Here's my own submission. It's a portion of the song Unchained Melody by the Righteous Brothers. I still have to finish recording it but here's what I've done thus far... http://www.box.net/shared/688qixxjtd

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Thanks dude! :D

I can honestly say that the way I now sing is directly influenced by the great advice I have received here on the forums. What has helped the most is learning to bridge into my head voice and how to lean into that sound when I want more edge to it.

This song is one that used to really give me issues but since I've been practicing bridging and doing lots and lots of lip bubbling and humming my head voice has become more controllable. I drive my poor girlfriend crazy by constantly humming or making buzzing noises through my passagio! lol She forgives me when I sing to her though. ;)

I actually recorded that with no warm up and did it more to just see if I'd be able to sing it easier than before. My head voice felt so much easier to use than before and it made it enjoyable to sing! Thanks to everyone who shares their advice with the rest of us.

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As the title says, I'd like to hear your head voices but not the heavy belting stuff. I'd love to hear the softer stuff that really shows control,range and emotion. Here's my own submission. It's a portion of the song Unchained Melody by the Righteous Brothers. I still have to finish recording it but here's what I've done thus far... http://www.box.net/shared/688qixxjtd

Snax: This was very enjoyable to listen to. Thanks for posting it.

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Here is a clip of my "headvoice". It's an over exagerated try from the start of "Bring Him Home". The reason why it's hard is because it lies in the middle of the voice. :

http://www.box.net/shared/bj6ynr4ddo

Martin: Very nice! Nice chops, and impressive phrase length, my man.

If I could make an observation... on the word 'Hear', you are getting strong resonance on your F1, but not on youf F2. Looking at the spectrograph, you've tuned that formant between 2 of the upper harmonics, so neither of them is emphasized.

The perception of that word being an 'ee' vowel, even if a dark one, will be enhanced it you tune F2 (via a small vowel mod, either toward ih or a brighter ee, so that it lines up with a harmonic. It will also be easier to sing, and will balance better with the next word, 'my'.

Several ways to move F2, but the easiest to raise it is to just slightly smile.

Similarly, the vowel on 'prayr' would be clearer and easier if you tuned F2.

Great to hear your voice!

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Snax: Sure! I'll even put some spectragraphs of your voice on the site.

Wow, that would be awesome! Thanks Steven! Of course I'll have NO idea what any of it means but it will be cool none the less! lol

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Steven,

Thanks a lot for your analysis! I've tried what you said...how is this compared to the formant tuning? :

http://www.box.net/shared/lczr7kdklc

Martin: Quite a bit better, actually, on both the Ah and the ee. The first spectragraph is the from the sustained 'Ah' you sing right before the word 'hear'. Your first recording is traced in blue, the 2nd in white. I matched the volume of the fundamentals, so you can see the relative strengths of all the other harmonics.

What stands out right away is that the 2nd recording has much more energy in the harmonics, and the one which carries the bulk of the sound, (the 2nd peak, counting from the left,) is quite stronger in the 2nd performance - 10dB louder. While the F2 from 'ah' is mostly invisible, you do have strong upper harmonics in the 2nd recording (white) which are substantially softer in the first performance. This is likely due to an improvement in your actual phonation. Below the Ah spectragraph I will continue with the ee.

Now, for the ee, we get something very important, and pertinent to our discussion. Again, the first recording in blue, the 2nd in white, with the fundamentals matched for volume.

This graph shows how really well you are shading your ee vowel so that F1 matches your fundamental. The peak goes right to the top of the screen for both of your recordings. There are very big differences in the strengths of the upper harmonics, going to the right of that.

Looking there, you see that the 2nd and especially the 3rd harmonic are stronger in your 2nd recording than in your first. IMO, this is likely a better phonation characteristic, and not the result of F2 tuning. Up above that, though, you do get some help on the 5th harmonic, at about 1800Hz. The reason I say this is that F2 for the /i/ (ee) vowel, depending on how you shade it, is going to be between 1500 and 2000 Hz, and this is on the brighter side.

As an alternative pronunciation, try an 'ih' with slightly rounded lips. I think you will find you get an acceptable pronunciation of the word, and can get a really good emphasis for your 4th harmonic with that. IMO, the more you play around with this, the better you will get at it.

FYI, the program I used to do these is called spectragram. I did the mixing and balancing of your multiple takes in Cakewalk SONAR.

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Me next, me next! ;):P

Snax: I did some looking at the acappella version of 'unchained', and wanted to show you the difference in the harmonic structure of the vowel /a/ (ah) as sung in 2 places in the song 1) at the climactic 'are you still mine' (where you go up with quite a bit of strength), and 2) right after that, when you've transitioned to head voice, and you have come back down to the same note as 'mine', but in your head voice production. I want you to see the difference between 'ah' at the top of the chest voice, and in head.

The first spectragram is the word 'mine', and you can see a very strong 2nd harmonic, counting from the left. You are singing it fairly open and dramatically, with little vibrato, and can do so because your F1 sits right there on that harmonic, and the formant provides a cushioning effect for the voice when that happens. The narrowness of the peaks indicate very little vibrato. The harmonic structure is strong, and you have some twang going on where the red vertical lines are.

Here is your spectragram for the word 'mine"

Now, here is the 'ah' a few notes later, after you have transitioned up, and have come back down to that same note, this time in head voice. You'll notice that your 2nd harmonic is not the strongest, your 3rd harmonic is, but not as prominent as the 2nd was before. Also, the twang characteristics are different. You have 2 prominent harmonics straddling the red lines, just about equally on both sides. Some of the harmonics which were quite strong in 'mine' are not so strong here. There are some more comments after this 2nd picture.

As a recommendation, I think you could make the head voice section more effective by pulling back just a little on the word 'mine' and singing a slightly darker vowel, closer to a dark aw or oh. That color will slide more effectively into head voice, so that there will not appear to be so much of a break as you go there.

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