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I'm killing myself over Proper Breathing

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Overdrive

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The past week I have been trying to learn proper breathing/support. All I have is CVT, but it seems like they came up with a really strange method that I've been trying anyway. I don't know if my abs are supposed to come out at all, CVT says they goes IN a bit; I don't know if I should feel it in my chest, CVT says I shouldn't breath "too much" but I have no idea how much is too much or too little.

I think I'm freaking myself out over this. I don't know if I can learn this just by reading about it. Is there a good video or can someone describe it really simply?

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don't stress over this.

it's mainly about teaching your body to control expiration.

simply put (very simply) when you speak or simply breath air comes in and air goes out.

but when you breathe for singing air comes in but needs to expire in a purposely controlled fashion, it just doesn't release right out.

part of your vocal training will involve development of the muscles involved in expiration.

are you doing any exercises for this?

a great book on breathing and a quick read is by jaime vendera called "ultimate breathing workout."

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don't stress over this.

it's mainly about teaching your body to control expiration.

simply put (very simply) when you speak or simply breath air comes in and air goes out.

but when you breathe for singing air comes in but needs to expire in a purposely controlled fashion, it just doesn't release right out.

part of your vocal training will involve development of the muscles involved in expiration.

are you doing any exercises for this?

a great book on breathing and a quick read is by jaime vendera called "ultimate breathing workout."

Thank you for the book suggestion I think I will get it as this is very important to me.

To better explain my issue though: early on I found the idea that breathing from your diaphragm involved a great expansion of your 'belly'. I got this from youtube video, although I started out with vocal lessons for a few months and not even once did the teacher go over proper support/breathing even though I was a newbie.

Now I see that CVT clearly states that a large expansion of your belly (called 'lavatory support' but it's basically like trying to make yourself seem fat) is NOT what you want to do. This is essentially exactly what I've been doing for years. Now that I found out it's wrong I'm having trouble trying to figure out the proper way.

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over,

when it comes to voice study, we all know conflicting opinions is the norm.

don't look at other information as always being wrong, just different. sometimes there simply is no absolute, proper way.

we've already seen how some great singers shrug their shoulders even though we're told it's "wrong."

the only part that i would say is wrong, is if you were to inhale a huge quantity of air to puff up the stomach. then you get all locked up and struggle with the volume of air. the body doesn't know what to do with all the air...it wants to relieve itself of the excess.

try this experiment:

breathe in a huge quantity of air. hold it, and now try to inhale over the previous inhale once, twice, three times ...like you were blowing up a balloon and you don't want the air to go out between breaths.

notice how the body has a way of stabilizing itself. there's a feeling like the air has oozed out to rebalance the body even though you haven't exhaled!!

you can puff up your stomach without inhaling a huge amount of air. did i make any sense?

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over,

when it comes to voice study, we all know conflicting opinions is the norm.

don't look at other information as always being wrong, just different. sometimes there simply is no absolute, proper way.

we've already seen how some great singers shrug their shoulders even though we're told it's "wrong."

the only part that i would say is wrong, is if you were to inhale a huge quantity of air to puff up the stomach. then you get all locked up and struggle with the volume of air. the body doesn't know what to do with all the air...it wants to relieve itself of the excess.

try this experiment:

breathe in a huge quantity of air. hold it, and now try to inhale over the previous inhale once, twice, three times ...like you were blowing up a balloon and you don't want the air to go out between breaths.

notice how the body has a way of stabilizing itself. there's a feeling like the air has oozed out to rebalance the body even though you haven't exhaled!!

you can puff up your stomach without inhaling a huge amount of air. did i make any sense?

Yeah I think I get what you're saying. For the experiment I fill up with air, and then while holding that try to get in even more with little breaths and soon it seems impossible to get any more. And yeah if I tense the muscles in a certain way I can puff out the stomach, which is what I don't want to do right?

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i wouldn't want to use the word "tense", as that implies staticity. basically, expand on inhale, but resist imploding on the exhale. you want to be able dynamically oppose the release of the diaphragm.

when you first learn support, there is a tendency to overinflate and/or resist sudden expiration by clutching the throat and using the vocal folds as a seal rather than for their primary purpose in singing....pitch making.

as you get stronger, you gain the ability to resist exhalation just using the muscles of the lower core, leaving the throat and vocal folds, laryngeal muscles all of that relaxed and free.

it's also a mindset, a willed diversion of tension.

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The past week I have been trying to learn proper breathing/support. All I have is CVT, but it seems like they came up with a really strange method that I've been trying anyway. I don't know if my abs are supposed to come out at all, CVT says they goes IN a bit; I don't know if I should feel it in my chest, CVT says I shouldn't breath "too much" but I have no idea how much is too much or too little.

I think I'm freaking myself out over this. I don't know if I can learn this just by reading about it. Is there a good video or can someone describe it really simply?

I also need for a video ,It would be better.If possible then please upload a video by which we all know the proper,

Thanks for asking this question....

_________________________________

Teeth cleaning Houston

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So if I work on getting six-pack abs, will I also get better at support? :P

Yes, and you will look good, too.

It's okay for belly expansion on inhale. But when singing the note, you want to control the expiration. And you should feel the motion in your intercostals and obliques. Similar to what you do dropping a deuce. That sort of increased muscular control slows the expiration of air and then you can control it with the motion of your gut. Sing from the gut. This takes the strain off the throat, which allows the note to get into the resonating spaces it needs.

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I think another point may be to not inhale or expand your belly so purposefully. Some new singers may be ( I was) inhaling deeply and expanding their belly for every note. I no longer do this, I take in only the air I need for what I will be singing. Like speaking, I don't stand there taking deep breaths for every sentence.

If I am inhaling for a long phrase in a song or a long or high (or both) note I take in more air, if not then I take in less. For me it's less tiring and less tension. So in essence I'm not actively "trying" to expand my belly as if I had a beer belly. I'm just breathing deep and utilizing the diaphragm.

It sometimes helps to look up how the diaphragm works. I think many have the impression it goes in and out. The action is more of an up and down compression. It descends to give the lungs room and full extension then it expands upward to compress the lungs pushing the air out. You want to control this. Also when you inhale your ribs expand (external intercostals help this motion). When you exhale the ribs help squeeze air out of the lungs, so to speak, by compressing (internal intercostals).

Your job is to keep the ribs open while you are controling air out. It's a battle between internal and external intercostals. Meanwhile the diaphram is pushing up on the lungs to release air. When you inhale and the diaphragm descends it creates a vacuum and air is puled into the lungs, I think this is more down then out. This may be why your method says not to expand the belly. The belly really has nothing to do with it...I think. Ab "muscles" are involved with controlling the exhale.

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Tommy is so right. The muscles in the thoracic region relax which allows the diaphragm to flex downward, an autonomic reaction. Upon exhale, the diaphragm relaxes, pushing air out. By engaging intercostals, etc, you control how fast and under what pressure the exhalation is.

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when you get to the point of being really able to support, you will sense a newfound freedom in the voice where the throat feels very uninvolved, very resonant, yet passive and tall "feeling" likely due to your ability to release the muscles around the larynx and you'll begin to more consistently maintain a relaxed feeling even though you might be singing really powerfully.

at an advanced state, there becomes an ability to use the lower core as a volume/intensity control (even though you get a ton of volume from resonance alone) you can learn to "appropraitely" squeeze the lower belly for more "umph."

it's very similar to those kid's bicycle horns, you know the ones that have the rubber ball at the end, and if you squeeze the rubber ball quickly rather than gradually you get that quick spike of volume?

see where i'm going? but if you try doing this kind of thing without having that basic development in place, you risk locking up the throat and forcefully pushing too much air into the folds, rather than "applying" the air into the folds.

big difference!

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hey Overdrive,

I'm kindof on the same road as you with developing good breathing.. a lot of us would be. What I've found to help is to try and avoid breathing in excessively, you'll know how much to breathe if you run out of air during a phrase.

One thing that's driving my practice and helping me achieve the sensation of a neutral larynx is humming through a thin straw which there are lots of topics on. The aim is to keep the larynx relaxed while having pressure/support on. you can always test out of your larynx is fully disengaged by trying a siren up to the high notes.. if your larynx jumps around then you need more practice.

I use the straw for about half an hour, on and off to maintain the feeling of support. As I said I'm probably at the same stage as you or worse but this is really helping me with breathing and I've felt like im making progress.

The way I judge my progress is my ability to sing notes in my passaggio like D# E F and F# without a tense or choked feeling or sound, which is usually accompanied by a relaxed neck and without my larynx moving. Currently I've had some good experiences with it, but since I just started this 2 weeks ago, on most days muscles in the neck still try to tense up and choke the sound, even after a whole hour session. I've found that the more I can push from the diaphragm/core area, the less my neck tends to tense.

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