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Two weeks ago I pushed it too much with my voice. I was singing really high for too long and I pulled something - I could feel it. For the first week of no singing I could still feel this little pulled muscle somewhere in my larynx. And my voice became tired when speaking. After one week of no singing I tried my voice. I warmed up and went high. My voice sounded good, but I could feel it wasn't quite healed yet. For the second week of no singing, the sensation of the pulled muscle is gone, but my voice still gets tired easily from speaking. Now I'm coming to the end of the second week. I don't know if I should even test it. Maybe wait another week? Unfortunately I cannot abstain from speaking. If I could, I think I would be healed by now. This waiting game is frustrating.

Any advice?

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I would assume that you need some changes to your singing technique so as not to fatigue your voice. Singing higher shouldn't be any more tiring than singing deeper when done correctly. If you have to strain to sing those notes you need to learn to stop using the constrictors. I'm sure others will explain further.

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It's also possible that you wore out your support and thus constricted by the end of the night. Singing higher should not hurt...but it generally requires more energy/support than singing in your mid-range.

I've done all kinds of goofy(seemingly destructive) things to my voice over this last year(experimenting with new sounds/volumes/ranges)...it has ALWAYS bounced back. Check into support/breathing exercises and make sure your "speaking voice" is not getting constricted. It's good to be cautious...but if your voice does not HURT, I would think you are fine.

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Thanks guys for the feedback. I have had lots of training in the past and I know what you mean about proper technique. I've had somewhat of a revelation due to this great forum. I watched a few Brett Manning videos and figured out how to extend my upper range to levels I really never could reach before. For weeks I was vocalizing up to high Eb above high C and with no tention. In the past its been a struggle getting up to anything above a G - I could do it, but only with tons of support and "operatic" sounding. I was so happy about this newfound technique, for weeks I'm singing this high and no issues. No pulled muscles. I thought nothing can hurt my voice anymore. So I started practicing "Carry on my Wayward Sun" and "Don't stop beleiving" - songs I never thought I would be able to sing - but I'm singing them! But I'm singing too much and one day during warm up - up in the high D / Eb range I felt myself pulling something. I could tell right away. I think you are right analog - I wasn't supporting enough. I guess I'm not infallable! I know I'll get my voice back - this kind of thing has happened a few times throughout my life. It's just frustrating. It's been two weeks with no singing and I'm almost back - I think I'll give it one more week. Does this ever happen to you guys?

Here is a sample of my singing if you want to listen and give me some pointers (There is a high B at the end - but I'm singing it my old way):

http://soundclick.com/share?songid=7148191

Again - thanks for your feedback. This is a really cool forum.

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I would assume that you need some changes to your singing technique so as not to fatigue your voice. Singing higher shouldn't be any more tiring than singing deeper when done correctly. If you have to strain to sing those notes you need to learn to stop using the constrictors. I'm sure others will explain further.

Can you tell me what you mean about the constrictors? I'm not familiar, and maybe I pulled one of these?

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I've seen this kind of problem several times in my voice rehabilitation work.

I believe that there can be "muscle pulls" or strains in the tiny muscles in & around the larynx, just as anywhere else in the body. Most often this is happening in the muscles that stabilize the larynx in place in the neck. Unfortunately, every time we talk or swallow, the problem gets aggravated, or at least doesn't heal as fast.

Best advice: STAY PATIENT & REST voice as much as you can. DOn't talk a lot, DON't keep testing your voice. Take whatever anti-inflammatory pill you normally tolerate for a sprained ankle (aspirin, ibuprofen), normal dose, for a week or 2.

And set up two washcloths & bowls you can use for hot-and-cold alternating compresses -- icewater in one, as-hot-as-tolerated inthe other. Towel around chest/shoulders to catch drips. hold damp washcloth on the area of neck where you felt the initial strain,until temp fades, then back in the bowl & switch to the other one. Alternate for about 20 minutes 2-3x day. Always end with cold.

You can even try rubbing a little bit of "icyhot," Tiger Balm, or Arnica (cream or gel) on the area, also to decrease inflammation.

with this kind of care, you should feel a lot better in 3-4 weeks. YES it sucks but it WILL get better!

& It is not necessarily a sign of bad technique overall. You might want to work with a teacher who can watch very closely when you get to high/loud stuff, see if you're craning your neck in a subtle way to get that last bit of power. Those little compensations, done suddenly or in a "perfect storm" of other tensions, can be the culprit.

hope this helps! contact me directly with more Qs.

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I've seen this kind of problem several times in my voice rehabilitation work.

I believe that there can be "muscle pulls" or strains in the tiny muscles in & around the larynx, just as anywhere else in the body. Most often this is happening in the muscles that stabilize the larynx in place in the neck. Unfortunately, every time we talk or swallow, the problem gets aggravated, or at least doesn't heal as fast.

Best advice: STAY PATIENT & REST voice as much as you can. DOn't talk a lot, DON't keep testing your voice. Take whatever anti-inflammatory pill you normally tolerate for a sprained ankle (aspirin, ibuprofen), normal dose, for a week or 2.

And set up two washcloths & bowls you can use for hot-and-cold alternating compresses -- icewater in one, as-hot-as-tolerated inthe other. Towel around chest/shoulders to catch drips. hold damp washcloth on the area of neck where you felt the initial strain,until temp fades, then back in the bowl & switch to the other one. Alternate for about 20 minutes 2-3x day. Always end with cold.

You can even try rubbing a little bit of "icyhot," Tiger Balm, or Arnica (cream or gel) on the area, also to decrease inflammation.

with this kind of care, you should feel a lot better in 3-4 weeks. YES it sucks but it WILL get better!

& It is not necessarily a sign of bad technique overall. You might want to work with a teacher who can watch very closely when you get to high/loud stuff, see if you're craning your neck in a subtle way to get that last bit of power. Those little compensations, done suddenly or in a "perfect storm" of other tensions, can be the culprit.

hope this helps! contact me directly with more Qs.

Thanks a lot Joanna. I appreciate your feedback.

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