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Having some balacing trouble:

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Consumingfire39
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I can now get very unrestricted and open in my throat but I can't maintain the buziness and front placement. When I have that open feeling, I lose the buzz and cannot seem to balance the two. Should I be able to have a raised soft pallate and still be able to feel the vibrations in my lips?

I know how to get my placement forward and I know how to open my throat. Any exercises on how to combine the two principles at the same time?

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Short answer is yes, you should. But too forward will kill covering and too covered will kill forward. You need them both, almost all the time.

Still, although it sounds simple, and in fact the idea is quite simple, the trainning to get there is not. You absolutely need a coach to work with these concepts, as the method relies almost totally on the perception and guidance of a teacher.

Can you control each individually as you will on all the vowels? Or at least forward placement and focus?

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I have not tried to go through all of the vowels with forward placement. Just thinking about it, it seems like it would be very difficult. I can get the placement from any constanant. For example, if I put an M before ah or oh, I would be able to feel it. I have, on several occassions, had a very open throat and stayed buzzy in the lips but I don't know how to find it consistently.

It is good to know that this is a difficult thing for everyone and not just a flaw in my own ability.

This teacher (I know it is just online) has seemed to be the most effective for me. What do you think about his placement excercises/technique?

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For it to work, you need to be able to use the concepts on all vowels, without any consonant to help. Once its all centered around focus, then you can repeat all the work with covering, from there you can begin thinking of balance on the passagio. As Izz said, cant be done through force.

Without constricting, strainning or being airy its actually impossible to have one without the other, at least within the tessitura, so you have to work from what you already have, you are learning new definitions but the actions are already there.

But are you taking lessons from him? Or trying to follow the videos? You absolutely need to settle a decent and free basic emission to start working on resonance. Resonance tracking is simply fine tunning the vowels into something more efficient, but everything you use to train while doing the vowels WILL be assimilated by your brain, and its very hard to let go. So exercise caution, please, do not work alone using this approach.

It takes time man, and its not easy to achieve. Once you get it going it becomes piece of cake, but until then... you will have a lot of work. But the results are worth the effort.

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If you are like me, warming up in falsetto is an absolute necessity to get my front placement. Something that doesn't hurt to try, it might work or it might just fall apart : P.

What do you do with the falsetto? Is it mainly just going through the vowels and try to slide them down? Do you have a routine?

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Falsetto is a weakness within itself, so it cannot cure another weakness.

You must learn to keep the vocal folds engage throughout your range without trying to push for sound or disconnect for freedom of movement.

I really believe we need to hear and audio clip to help you.

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Don't force the buzz!

The buzzy forward feeling is a RESULT of proper vibration of the vocal folds. Focus on keeping a clean/clear tone with great fold closure while maintaining that open feeling.

That explains how I have had the lips buzzing before with a fully open throat and no thought on placement. I just get stuck in my throat often and need to really overcompensate throughout the day just to stay balanced.

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I will try to get some recordings done. Should I try to record when I am having the problem, or when I am placing the correct way?

Just record yourself singing a few 5 tone scales on a few different vowels. E and in knee, eh as in feather, ah as in father, O as in oboe, and u as in food. I honestly believe you may be over thinking things.

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@izzle1989, lol ok I'm not even gonna address the difference between head and falsetto. It works for me, and I like to call it falsetto. There's tons of different configurations you can get into in that register space, it's too confusing for me to describe each one specifically. But I can sing a belty head note and a lighter falsetto(or whatever you want to call it) with the same note. I don't think either is weak.

@ConsumingFire, I warm up in falsetto which helps lighten my voice enough to get my placement. Placement should be very light and raw sounding. Support should then be added slowly once you have found your placement. Focus on the "O" vowel, because O uses the least amount of air, which means you will not over-support as much. Ignore how the vowel sounds, but see if you can add support without ruining your placement.

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I can now get very unrestricted and open in my throat but I can't maintain the buziness and front placement. When I have that open feeling, I lose the buzz and cannot seem to balance the two. Should I be able to have a raised soft pallate and still be able to feel the vibrations in my lips?

I know how to get my placement forward and I know how to open my throat. Any exercises on how to combine the two principles at the same time?

You can tweak how open your throat is until you find that middle ground where you can still project in the mask area while maintaining an open throat.

Also, while in the lower register, your throat doesn't need to be 100% open all the time, as it tends to sound pretty dark and muddy.

As you go up the scale incorporate some twang and that will help you get forward placement while maintaining an open throat.

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@izzle1989, lol ok I'm not even gonna address the difference between head and falsetto. It works for me, and I like to call it falsetto. There's tons of different configurations you can get into in that register space, it's too confusing for me to describe each one specifically. But I can sing a belty head note and a lighter falsetto(or whatever you want to call it) with the same note. I don't think either is weak.

@ConsumingFire, I warm up in falsetto which helps lighten my voice enough to get my placement. Placement should be very light and raw sounding. Support should then be added slowly once you have found your placement. Focus on the "O" vowel, because O uses the least amount of air, which means you will not over-support as much. Ignore how the vowel sounds, but see if you can add support without ruining your placement.

Are you under the impression that head voice has to be loud? Or that we have to sing in falsetto to sing lightly?

I'm not trying to challenge you or your knowledge I'm trying to help out a fellow member that's all. I will not advise singing in falsetto because it's something that happens when we don't have control. We should always aim to sing in a connected way. Today's standard of head voice is not really correct it's really falsetto.

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Are you under the impression that head voice has to be loud? Or that we have to sing in falsetto to sing lightly?

I'm not trying to challenge you or your knowledge I'm trying to help out a fellow member that's all. I will not advise singing in falsetto because it's something that happens when we don't have control. We should always aim to sing in a connected way. Today's standard of head voice is not really correct it's really falsetto.

Okay, I understand that, but I don't agree with not using falsetto. Even though the cords are open, when I warm up a bit in falsetto, it directly translates to my placement, but when I try to lighten my voice, everything is too heavy, covered, and supported to get to that point. So don't rule out falsetto as not useful. Someone might be able to give me a better exercise, but it works for me, and it might work for other people.

I definitely don't translate falsetto into anything other than this.

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Okay, I understand that, but I don't agree with not using falsetto. Even though the cords are open, when I warm up a bit in falsetto, it directly translates to my placement, but when I try to lighten my voice, everything is too heavy, covered, and supported to get to that point. So don't rule out falsetto as not useful. Someone might be able to give me a better exercise, but it works for me, and it might work for other people.

I definitely don't translate falsetto into anything other than this.

Okay that's cool, but we have to remember that we have hundreds of readers who take these tip to heart. If we post incorrect information they will continue to be confused. I would never say anything to anybody before I have done years of research on it and I'm positive that it's not misinformation.

Sorry if you felt a bad vibe from my "internet" tone since I would have been able to communicate more clearly if we were talking in person. Do you have a skype? Will you be participating in the conference calls?

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Okay that's cool, but we have to remember...

Well I thought that my original post here had sufficient warning for this topic, it is also based on real observable evidence in quite a few cases. I guess I could write it in more detail next time. However, I realized that my post on another topic could be revised more to avoid this confusing conundrum that you had pointed out.

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falsetto is great training for loads of types of singers. Yes there are alot of singers reading this, who has fed you that lie that falsetto is bad? It's just à tonal quality like any other, sounds are sounds none is better or worse, taste is a diffrent discussion...

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falsetto is great training for loads of types of singers. Yes there are alot of singers reading this, who has fed you that lie that falsetto is bad? It's just à tonal quality like any other, sounds are sounds none is better or worse, taste is a diffrent discussion...

This is true, but I guess I am a little biased because I favor classical technique more than any other.

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falsetto is great training for loads of types of singers. Yes there are alot of singers reading this, who has fed you that lie that falsetto is bad? It's just à tonal quality like any other, sounds are sounds none is better or worse, taste is a diffrent discussion...

I agree. And I have used falsetto in recovery, after I injured my voice. I have used it in training and in marking a song. Marking is where you sing key bits in falsetto to ensure note placement, especially in rehearsal. Something that theater and opera singers do, as a matter of fact. And I have used it for effect in a song. So have Freddie Mercury and Justin Hawkins. And Axl Rose. And I think it turned out okay. Fortunately for us, the listening public, they didn't get the memo that falsetto is bad.

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