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Staying on pitch with CD tracks

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chamcham
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I have a silly question.

Why is it so hard for me to stay on pitch when listening to a CD track?

But when I play the same song on piano (or if someone is singing next to me), I am right on pitch.

Even if there is a piano playing on the CD track, I still can't stay on pitch.

I'm beginning to wonder if the audio processing makes it harden for me to perceive pitch.

Is there something about the effects/compression/EQ/mastering that makes it harden to perceive pitch?

Are engineers boosting/cutting/filtering out frequencies in the mixing/mastering stage that make it harder to perceive pitch?

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I've said this in other threads before and many simply don't wish to acknowlege it because faith wins over science and economics.

cd's that you can buy for sale for a retailer or whatever source come from major labels trying to make the most money off the effort.

I've read 4 books on recording (even though I still stink at it.) Every author I have read, who expects to get his 10 percent of the artist's 12.5 percent from the album autotunes everything. Instruments, voice, everything gets autotuned. Period, paragraph, new book.

In real life, the majority of people have what's called relative pitch, which can be as small as a few hundredths off true pitch to 1/10 off true pitch and most people cannot hear the difference. You only notice it when something approaches 1/4 off pitch.

Anyway, when you sing along with a cd, you are not singing along with the singer, you are singing along with autotune.

Let the wailing and great nashing of teeth begin.

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I've said this in other threads before and many simply don't wish to acknowlege it because faith wins over science and economics.

cd's that you can buy for sale for a retailer or whatever source come from major labels trying to make the most money off the effort.

I've read 4 books on recording (even though I still stink at it.) Every author I have read, who expects to get his 10 percent of the artist's 12.5 percent from the album autotunes everything. Instruments, voice, everything gets autotuned. Period, paragraph, new book.

In real life, the majority of people have what's called relative pitch, which can be as small as a few hundredths off true pitch to 1/10 off true pitch and most people cannot hear the difference. You only notice it when something approaches 1/4 off pitch.

Anyway, when you sing along with a cd, you are not singing along with the singer, you are singing along with autotune.

Let the wailing and great nashing of teeth begin.

Thanks for the advice.

Maybe it's the autotune that's throwing me off.

I've been taking voice lessons for about 1.5 years now.

I was just wondering why I couldn't follow along to CD tracks.

It's always been something that I noticed.

When I hear someone sing next to me or when I play the piano, I can feel the vibrations

from the notes and react to it instantly. It's like I can feel the sound waves all around me

and that keeps me in tune.

But when I hear a music CD track, I don't feel anything like that. I can't feel anything from the notes.

I was just wondering if modern-day audio processing removes something from the music harmonically.

Like in my last lesson, my teacher and I chose a practice song ("Count on Me" by Bruno Mars). I played it on my iPod the first time (just to show what the original song sounds like) and I was WAY off pitch for much of the song. I just couldn't feel anything. But afterwards, when we played the same song on piano, I hit every note effortlessly.

One of the few CDs that I can reliably sing along to is my vocal workout CD.

I can clearly hear and feel every note. Maybe the CD tracks have little to no

processing.

It just seems like I can't feel anything from recent music CD tracks.

Maybe that's not a bad thing.

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I am the opposite. If I hear a song on CD or radio I can jump right in there but unless I have really practiced alot it is hard for me to find the starting pitch when singing to live music. Once I find starting pitch I am basically fine.

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Also, a listener can have relative pitch. not just the singer. A listener can have varying degrees of hearing loss, and just plain odd parts. Yes it is possible for someone to play somone within relative pitch of true, and someone to hear relative of true and it doesn't coincide. Most of those who are incapable of singing and pitch recognition that is off the mark often wind up being music critics.

:lol:

Oops, I think I said that out loud.

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We cannot tell any thing without a sample. Send sample with you singing to piano and one singing to cd.

Then we might be able to help. You may have perfect pitch but we will not know until then.

One more thing do you mean singing to karaoke tracks or regular CDs of any band.

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