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How do you personally define "Mix Voice"?

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DDisNow
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I was watching Rob Lunte's world famous "Mix voice is dead!" video and it got me thinking.

Rob says in the video that there's no such thing is a "mix", you are either in chest or head, you cannot sing half in your chest and half in your head, and that what most people are referring to as "Mix" is simply low head tones.

This makes sense to me, so I was wondering when people say things like "I'm working on strengthening my mix" "I'm working on better blending chest and head" "I'm trying to get more chest into in my head" etc, are they really just saying "I'm trying to get stronger low head tones"?

I know these definitions confuse a lot of people myself included.

When I was starting out and was trying to figure out this stuff , I'd be in low head voice but was also trying in some weird way to bring chest into it and would always feel an unpleasant "pull" in my throat, so I gave up on trying to do that.

Instead I focused on getting those low head tones stronger with better closure, now it's very loud, no need to add anything to that.

How do you define and approach "Mix voice" when singing?

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Certainly confusing, I'm just understanding this now. Rob is correct, Chest voice has to be 'supported'. The support in the chest voice is like a bar clamp, as you sing higher in chest, your support has to get stronger and the bar clamp as to clamp down further. Normally, with support, you will run into constrictions, and "Mix" is just when your support gets around the largest constrictions and can continue supporting and clamping. You are going into head voice range, but you aren't using head voice at all.

Rob knows perfectly well how to explain the muscles as you move up in chest voice, but this does never equal the single term of "mix"

If you sing in head voice, your chest/cord/ and thyroarytenoid pressure is completely diminished, and thus you will never have any chest tone. There is no clamping action. No mix, even if you are really good at holding onto the pressure while in head voice, it's just not chest.

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If you sing in head voice, your chest/cord/ and thyroarytenoid pressure is completely diminished, and thus you will never have any chest tone. There is no clamping action. No mix, even if you are really good at holding onto the pressure while in head voice, it's just not chest.

I'm not talking about not using chest voice.

What I'm trying to say is that I think, the term "Mix" is confusing, like Rob Says.

You can sing several higher notes by somewhat pulling chest, or you can sing the same exact notes in low head voice (Full head voice of course, not airy falsetto).

You cannot however sing the same note, at the same time in two different registers. That's why mix is confusing.

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I understand mix as 'a blend of the tonal qualities of chest voice and head voice'.

Nevertheless, I do think it's a term that could be clearer, primarily because it can be interpreted in different ways by different people. If one interprets 'mix' as meaning 'half chest voice and half head voice' then Rob is correct in saying this is wrong. If one interprets 'mix' as being 'a blend of the tonal qualities of head and chest voice' rather than the physical way the vocal cords work in chest or head, then mix can very much exist... but it's still a bit ambiguous as a term (IMO).

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Recently, Ive been pondering a novel take on mix, which is that the throat is wide open and the larynx hangs low in head notes. When I manage to sing a head note with loose throat, low larynx and a 'bite,' or slight grunt, from the chord closure, I get a fuller voice which doesnt physically feel like its being produced from one single place but, rather, feels like it resonates in my whole open funnel of a throat. So, a pure headnote, the way I understand it, feels like its somewhere around my nostrils, nose, eyebrows. Take the same note, let everything in the throat hang down, and it becomes a mixed voice; e.g., the sound becomes chestier.

Its a take on mix I havent heard before, so Im expecting it to get ripped apart, but its how it seems to physically feel for me.

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my take on it defined with help from frisell:

mixed voice = the skillful use of varying percentages of head and chest voice musculature to produce a tone anywhere in one's range.

the performing voice

you must include some degree of chest voice musculature in a performing singing voice.

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I would whole heartedly recommend the four pillars training program for bridging and 'mix'

It makes so much sense to me. Forget 'mix' and think bridging. You are either in your head voice or chest. Instead it works on trying to get a head voice that sounds like chesty belts (I guess this is what mix is) instead of a breathy falsetto. The way this is achieved is a mixture of cord closure (by using twang), vowel modification, mouth position, lowered larynx, resonance and other things to slowly build a full head voice. I don't think it's something that you can say 'this is how you do it' and ping, you can sing in mix. There isn't one magic exercise. It takes time to build up

The term 'mix' had me baffled for ages. Although I guess it may work for some people.

I feel it as a free, non strained, full sound that is resonant in the nasal cavities. If it hurts and feels like your straining then something is wrong

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This is the problem with terms and sensations. If you just think one voice as opposed to 3 different voices youre going to have slightly better luck in the SINGING Dept. Saying to your self "well i will just adjust my CT and bring in more headvoice and relax my TA so I don't pull chest is a nightmare. I took many yrs form SLS instructors and they always spoke of mixed voice and when they said to me "Thats it thats mix" It just felt like i was singing in my performing voice not falsetto or yelling it felt good and i just took that and spread it out all over my range lowest to highest.

Hope that helps :D

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Before I heard the term mix I heard it referred to as middle voice. I've never interpreted this as actually being "mixed." I always thought it was a term meant to describe a sound. Not a thing.

There is chest and there is head, both different sounds. Suppose you just wanted to have chest sound a little more heady or head sound a little more chesty or thick? Technique, I guess. Then the "sound" sounds mixed or not really/fully head and not really/fully chest. It kind of sounds like a bit of both.

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This is the problem with terms and sensations. If you just think one voice as opposed to 3 different voices youre going to have slightly better luck in the SINGING Dept. Saying to your self "well i will just adjust my CT and bring in more headvoice and relax my TA so I don't pull chest is a nightmare. I took many yrs form SLS instructors and they always spoke of mixed voice and when they said to me "Thats it thats mix" It just felt like i was singing in my performing voice not falsetto or yelling it felt good and i just took that and spread it out all over my range lowest to highest.

Hope that helps :D

I agree with the "problems of terms and sensations". Even if you are doing something with the proper setup you really don't know until someone who does know says " Yeah thats it."

In terms of "mixed resonance" I can take a tone and manipulate things to where I can feel resonance in my chest and in my head at the same time. Weather this is proper production or not I would not know until someone who knows and hears it says "yes that is correct."

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a good definition of mix is a performing voice....... when you sing correctly with power, projection and resonance.

if you don't mix the voice (per the definition i wrote above) it remains "incomplete" as far as i'm concerned.

your mix is what enables the fusion, the connectivity, to one seemless voice.

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