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Warm up and wait?

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abwin
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Okay so ive been singing for a few months now and love it. When i first warm up and try sing, it doesn't sound bad but its just overall breathy and there's no power. This has happen quite a lot and it gets really frustrating so i give up and just watch TV for like 20 minutes or so. When i try it again, suddenly my voice has opened and is more powerful and ever, i can hit all the right notes with power and control.

Why does this occur? Is it normal?

Also if i about to do a gig, does that mean i should warm up then wait THEN sing?? So confused.

Thanks for your time :)

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Interesting as that happens to me all the time as well.

I'll do a 45-60 min warmup/workout and feel somewhat exhausted for a while, then stay quiet for about 15-20 mins and then everything sounds very crisp and clear, better than during the actual continuous workout.

And yes, I heard multiple times that you should end your warmup about 20-30 mins before going on stage/recording, so I guess it has something to do with that.

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Like any sport you warm up/stretch get a sweat going then calm down and let the muscles settle into place. The cords settle and then approximate much easier and closer once they are fully stretched and exercised.:D

This is why during vocalizing you take short breaks and let the muscles calm down from all the stress your putting on them. Then continue. if you are having a rough time on a phrase over and over ,don't keep doing it let it go for a bit because all you are doing by continuing to strain is telling those muscles over and over that they are doing the right thing. muscle memory... you need to do the phrase perfect 100 times not pushed and wrong. So relax and come back to it..:)

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I think it's partly a mental trick. By breaking and coming back you reset your mind to a positive state. There must be a physical component to it as well, but I don't know how it works.

Also, what is your warm up? Some warm ups are better than others. You may just need a better warm up that will get rid of the breathiness quicker.

Another thing to consider is what you are typically eating or drinking while doing your warm up vs. the break vs. singing afterward. A lot of people don't seem to realize that heat is as important for the voice as hydration. If you're drinking cold water during your warm up, then eating something hot during your break, and then nothing before singing again, the extra heat from the food could be the reason why your voice is connecting better after taking a break.

I personally don't feel I need to take a break between warming up and singing, I'd rather warm up all the way up to right before I hit the stage. Maybe it's because I've been singing for a couple years and have built up really good stamina, good vocal health habits, good strength and coordination in the larynx, etc. Since you've only been singing for a few months, you're probably getting more benefit from taking breaks so that you're not using your voice nonstop and wearing it out. As you progress, you'll notice you can get to your peak potential quicker and stay in it for a much longer time.

owen, i don't really see how the extra heat from the food would have any impact. the folds won't ever be touched by the food unless you accidentally sent the food down the wrong pipe and in that case you'll choke.

maybe it might heat up the throat a bit, but you can't directly heat up the vocal folds via food or beverage.

you'll hear people say i need to wet my vocal cords, but you can't. the only way to hydrate them is from within by drinking water.

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Dunno, after warming up and setting things properly, the worse I can do is to wait without phonating, I keep doing some hummings or lip bubbles to make sure that the placement does not fall back.

20 minutes is more than enough for my voice to go back down. From experience, if I do this before singing, I get hurt on the first song, which is then used to force me into warming up again.

During trainning, its surelly much more efficient to do the exercises with attention and counciously, let go for a few minutes, find the postures again, and so on, until you dont have to search for the postures anymore. But most surely not from a warmed down state. Maybe doing different exercises, each for a while.

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Dunno, after warming up and setting things properly, the worse I can do is to wait without phonating, I keep doing some hummings or lip bubbles to make sure that the placement does not fall back.

20 minutes is more than enough for my voice to go back down. From experience, if I do this before singing, I get hurt on the first song, which is then used to force me into warming up again.

During trainning, its surelly much more efficient to do the exercises with attention and counciously, let go for a few minutes, find the postures again, and so on, until you dont have to search for the postures anymore. But most surely not from a warmed down state. Maybe doing different exercises, each for a while.

I didnt say a warmed down state thats crazy.:P

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Thanks, your advice is very helpful. My warm up is actually pretty basic (maybe too basic), it just consists of

Up lip rolls

Siren

scales (la la)

Me ee ay ay ah ay (i think that's right off the top of my head)

Then i guess i just start singing choruses on some songs i know.

I then keep singing but it sounds too breathy so i get frustrated.

Come back like 20 min later after and suddenly its all clear....

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Daniel makes great points. I find that taking a lot of breaks during practicing works very well. I'll vocalize many times each day - in the car going to work, in the car after work, then several times in the evening, putting breaks of 10min and or up to an hour or more between different exercises and songs.

The vocal rest is definitely helping you adduct more efficiently. However, over time, even your first vocalization should improve to the point where you won't have any of the breathiness. Right now it is probably a muscle strength thing / or lack of coordination. You aren't strong enough or coordinated enough yet for the vocalization to be perfect when you first start singing. That will go away.

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