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Keith
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So i did my workout, and proceeded to sing songs karaoke style through my PA system (which I normally do for an hour or 2 after my workout) and I was singing "Wasted Time" by slid row (dropped a whole step) when it happened. First, while holding a high note , it got real twangy and thin.. But it boomed through the PA - clipped it actually.. And I stopped singing and though about what I just did. Then, I continued . When I got to the chous again, the high note is higher and I did it again - but this time I messed with the vowel while holding the note (uh kind of feeling on the word behind) and suddenly, all my throat tension released and the note felt like I could hol it forever! Any thoUghts on what I did ?

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So i did my workout, and proceeded to sing songs karaoke style through my PA system (which I normally do for an hour or 2 after my workout) and I was singing "Wasted Time" by slid row (dropped a whole step) when it happened. First, while holding a high note , it got real twangy and thin.. But it boomed through the PA - clipped it actually.. And I stopped singing and though about what I just did. Then, I continued . When I got to the chous again, the high note is higher and I did it again - but this time I messed with the vowel while holding the note (uh kind of feeling on the word behind) and suddenly, all my throat tension released and the note felt like I could hol it forever! Any thoUghts on what I did ?

You found the vowel sound that tunes your voice and it is a little different for each voice. Some voices are 'ee' voices, others are 'eh' voices. That's what I mean when I talk about resonance. Once you get the right pocket of resonance, your mind perceives the right volume and pitch and you relax, doing nothing but supplying the breath. It's what I mean by saying that the the motion, when necessary, as it sometimes is, in the abs, with mobile, fluid breath management, note in the head, nothing in the throat, ever, amen. When you hear a recording of me doing an A5, I am feeling what you just felt.

And here's why. Each vowel causes a different shape of the tongue and how it guides a note to resonation.

Ron and his redneck engineering ....

Next, I expect you to do "Queen of the Ryche" and absolutely clip the mic and have to work your magic on mxing a really loud vocal track from your own voice, as I know you have had challenges mixing mine.

And congrats on a breakthrough.

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Well, yeah, it will take a way to make that vowel shift a habit, something instinctual. But you are a fast learner. Look at how much upper range you have gained in less than a year.

Before too long, you will be itching to do QOTR. And I will wait as patiently as I can. (foot tap, foot tap, foot tap)

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Hard to say from the text alone keith. Record it, send a sample.

But I must say that what you wrote makes sense, specially against what was happening on your recordigns. If you keep it forward and free and start to give room by using a closed vowel like uh, you are covering the sound, above the passagio, its head voice.

Thing is trainning so that all vowels are forward enough and that when you give room, you dont lose the edge, no matter how much you have to.

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like ron said, per your voice, the note, the vowel, you found the "initially elusive" pocket.

you sang that spot the most efficiently. the word "vowel" when if you remove it from a word related to language is basically a "throat socket." you're throat socket shape was ideal. you tuned the throat socket not much different than tuning an old analog transitor radio.

doing this with consistency is next. because once you experience it, it's like a drug. you seek to keep nailing it, and when you don't nail it, you know it as much as when you do.

congrats keith...go reward yourself!!

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