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Danielformica
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absolutely Dover openish if you will, lighter and brighter...Some people would say splatty but that is out of the mouth not split resonance. This takes a good ear and no letting go to full headvoice as that would be to heady and almost falsetto sounding. You need to think deeper but at the same time back of the head it takes coordination and time..Much more than most people will give it to build:)

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You would think that "Voice of the mind" would be in public domain by now. I have been looking for a pdf or Library where I could borrow it but haven't run across it yet. Are there any Caesari books in PDF form? Or do you know of a web site that give excerpts. I got a little taste after doing a google search. Would love to read more from him.

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I'm a big fan of an up and back placement too. I'm a firm believer in of Rob Lunte's greatest mantras: the higher the pitch, the deeper the placement. Deeper meaning further back. As you ascend into the head voice, the sound should travel further back into the head and slightly up, as the throat opens and welcomes those higher notes into a superior resonant space, where they can ring and gain depth instead of being pushed forward into one shouty, splatty, mouthy tonal color that lacks beauty.

Owen, question for you.

When you say "As you ascend into the head voice, the sound should travel further back into the head and slightly up...... instead of being pushed forward into one shouty, splatty, mouthy tonal color that lacks beauty"

Do you mean that when singing in head voice the placement should feel as if it's kinda glued to the back of your neck/head, as opposed to "directing" it towards the front of the face/mask area?

If that's what you mean, than I agree with you. I always find that everything sounds nicer, clearer and more refind "back there" as opposed to a more forward tone, which always sounds kinda bratty and punk-ish to me.

Not that there isn't room for both, but that's more of a stylistic choice I think.

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Owen thats what I hear as well, an uh as in "nothing" . And it definitely goes back, to the back of the head DD for sure.. I love his sound on this to me its a great vocal lesson the higher you go the further back you go. I wish I had learned that in the beginning of my training...:mad:

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ah! glad you asked..dan and dante helped me with that....

it's when you can sing a hollow, heady vowel like a "oo" with power under it without clenching....the throat stays open, and the folds and breath pressure power the tone....nothing gets the least bit squeezed.

there's a fine line between not having it sound too heady, and hooty, and not getting constriction involved as you work to thicken it.

i've been doing a bunch of low larynx exercises with "w"

"wee" "wuh" "woop" the "w" helps move you away from clenching....

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I agree that on the long sustained notes, this is "up and back" "bel canto" beautiful singing. However, on the shorter notes and phrases I think he moves things a bit more forward and certainly makes them far more staccato than we're used to hearing from people who typically sing in the "bel canto" style.

You can hear this on the first phrase "Oh beautiful". He sings it almost like one would speak it. If an opera singer were singing that phrase it would be "Ohhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh beauuuuuuuuuuuuutifuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuul" and have a much darker tone.

Not that there's anything wrong with this. This rendition of the national anthem is awesome, and it's nice that it differs from the typical rendition which is very legato and flowing.

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This rendition of the national anthem is awesome, and it's nice that it differs from the typical rendition which is very legato and flowing.

Tsk,Tsk,Tsk... this ain't the national anthem, it's "America The Beautiful"

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