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To get some good vocal cord closure... once and for all...

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LuiC345
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I seem to have a problem with my voice not being able to close properly.

Sure, I can execute a clear head voice on demand (not singing), but when it comes to exercises, I seem to have the temptation or tendency to give that little "push".

I know it's not what I'm supposed, and I clear up that bad habit, it'll go.

But, are there any effective vocal cord closure exercises I can do everyday?

If I am able to execute these methods on clearing my breaks, etc.

Then anything's possible! :)

Thanks!

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vocalize with the sound "gug." This increases the glottal stroke (coupe de glotte) and tends to increase compression in your adduction of folds.

Start out in the easy parts of your range. Right now, technique is more important than range.

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The best way I found vocal cord closure was with resonance and twang. You can 'quack' like a duck or 'nyeh nyeh nyeh' like a spoiled child and this is a good way to getting twanging (if that's even a word!) the muscles that give us good twang need building up so if you can do this everyday it gives you a chance to build them.

To apply this to an exercise you can start on a NG or mmm sound but make sure you feel the same twang you did with the quack. once you have this you can open out into an open vowel trying to keep the twang WITHOUT pushing! instead, feel the vibrations/resonance. Start with low notes then once you have them try some head tones. In my opinion (along with a few other factors) it is resonance and twang that gives a good vocal cord closure for those higher notes. The trick is keeping this connection all the way through your bridge and into your head without breaking into falsetto.

Hope this helps

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All of these all do work wonders and do work, and have heard of these advices, but thank you!. The problem I have exactly is that I seem to lose my closure as I go upwards. Usually round the higher part of my head voice, lower head voice is fine.

Even if I perform these exercises on my higher part of my head voice, it's weak and airy unlike the lower head voice which is clearer, yet "hooty".

What can I do improve my cord closure on my higher part of my head voice? I agree with ronws, but I keep worrying a out range, so I guess I'll focus on tech too. Thank you, though!

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I mean, I thought you're meant to go lighter and more... relaxed as you go higher, so I am a little confused.

So, do I put more compression as I go higher, or do I release the vocal weight as I go higher?

What I think will happen is that I'll lose my cord closure.... so can how can I fix this?

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Post a clip of what you are talking about so we can all hear what is happening. Until you do that, everyone here is just guessing what exactly is happening and making a determination on that guess - however educated that guess is.

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The more you work out the lower to midrange part of your voice with staccato vowels eh ee oh etc the better and easier your voice will stay together in the top part of your range. Remember if you keep working your head voice over and over and its airy you keep reaffirming the weak closure to your muscle memory.

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All of these all do work wonders and do work, and have heard of these advices, but thank you!. The problem I have exactly is that I seem to lose my closure as I go upwards. Usually round the higher part of my head voice, lower head voice is fine.

Even if I perform these exercises on my higher part of my head voice, it's weak and airy unlike the lower head voice which is clearer, yet "hooty".

What can I do improve my cord closure on my higher part of my head voice? I agree with ronws, but I keep worrying a out range, so I guess I'll focus on tech too. Thank you, though!

Lighter to start with so that you not pulling up chest or simply pushing your way through your break, then you can turn those notes into more powerful ones using twang. This airy quality will disappear once you have compressed the vocal cords and kept the connection using twang

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You could try scales on kah then ah straight after trying to make the ah as bright and punchy as the kah. This will educe closure but make sure your not pushing and be aware that this is a glottal onset which isn't the perfect onset you want for singing, something a bit softer but without the air/breathy quality is what you want

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The more you work out the lower to midrange part of your voice with staccato vowels eh ee oh etc the better and easier your voice will stay together in the top part of your range. Remember if you keep working your head voice over and over and its airy you keep reaffirming the weak closure to your muscle memory.

Oh my... that was some life saver advice! Thank you! Good thing I didn't do it repeatedly and stopped as I focused on other techniques.

Thank you!

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Lighter to start with so that you not pulling up chest or simply pushing your way through your break, then you can turn those notes into more powerful ones using twang. This airy quality will disappear once you have compressed the vocal cords and kept the connection using twang

Thank you! At last, some good advice. Just suffered from another forum site which had a guy giving you bad advice, and so moved here.

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What Gina said.

Also, by the way, around the D5 area, all singers, even tenors, go through a tonal shift, as the resonating space required for those notes and above becomes too small to resonate overtones, and all vowels start to sound the same, leaving the articulation to be the one thing left to work on. There's only enough room to resonate the fundamental and the distinct vowel sounds are caused by overtones, or the filtering thereof. It's actually a physics thing. For example, when you speak an r sound, the tip of the tongue curls up, filtering some of the harmonics or overtones of the phonated sound. Once again, it's a physics thing, namely, the science of acoustics.

Maybe it feels to airy to you but hearing a sample could help. And I hate to bring you bad news but it is a provable scientific fact that you cannot hear yourself the way others hear you.

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What Gina said.

Also, by the way, around the D5 area, all singers, even tenors, go through a tonal shift, as the resonating space required for those notes and above becomes too small to resonate overtones, and all vowels start to sound the same, leaving the articulation to be the one thing left to work on. There's only enough room to resonate the fundamental and the distinct vowel sounds are caused by overtones, or the filtering thereof. It's actually a physics thing. For example, when you speak an r sound, the tip of the tongue curls up, filtering some of the harmonics or overtones of the phonated sound. Once again, it's a physics thing, namely, the science of acoustics.

Maybe it feels to airy to you but hearing a sample could help. And I hate to bring you bad news but it is a provable scientific fact that you cannot hear yourself the way others hear you.

Yes, I'm quite aware of that fact, and I will make another thread to solely focus on the same topic but with a recording this time, because once I can fix it with your help, then I can really finish this task.

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