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Dampening The Larynx & Tuning The Vocal Tract! Video by Robert Lunte

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Robert Lunte
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Hey TMV World Forum:

Here is a new video I did for consumer consumption that discusses the benefits of learning to dampen the larynx, specifically, to dampen to the 'dampened overtone'. I will assert that this dampened position not only gives you more stability, but it gives you a much more beautiful color for any genre. ENJOY!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y5qPifWNw_c

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To me, on of the best bites in the whole video, and should be endemic to all basics, the qualities at onset are inherited by the sung note or phonation that follows. As you said in your book, onsets are singing, singing is onsets. Granted, that is an ancilliary thought to the focus of this vid, mainly the mobile larynx that can be lowered at will.

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The onset is the seed of the phonation that follows. If you have problems at the onset, you will inherit problems with the phonation or singing that follows. So that is why we calibrate and tune onsets in TVS. It saves a lot of time and frustration. Often, student and teacher are chasing their tails deep into the phonation, fixing this and repairing that... chasing individual components of a 'phonation package' they are not aware of and that is out of alignment. This problem can be cleaned up if the components in the phonation package, are aligned and balanced and tuned early on, at the onset.

As you move a phonation forward in frequency and time, chaos ensues and it becomes more difficult to keep the phonation package balanced and aligned... but with a good onset, it becomes much easier. Instead of cleaning up your phonation on the move, just make sure it is perfect at the start. But this video is not really about calibrating all the components of the onset package, its really more about just one important component, the tuning of the vocal tract, what that is, what to listen for and why its a great idea.

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Totally appreciate and agree with that. I think that is the problem of most beginning students and even some singers trying to fix problems. A singer starts off on the "wrong foot," so to speak, and degenerates from there.

People may simply not understand the value of the onset you show in every practice. the me-eh. That opens a resonator and starts a balanced onset, simultaneously, with a mid-height vowel sound, neither too high or too low.

I'm probably giving away the keys to the kingdom. But that is why I implore others to listen to what you do with a vowel, even if they gloss over the words, the sign language, whathaveyou. Listen to the teacher. Another good part of your skill. You are able to demonstrate and do what it is that you teach.

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I think I get it. When I am first practicing a song with a lower pitch and the song moves upward into middle area

I usually have to pause and regroup around E4 . But after I go through the song I can do it without pausing because I start the song with a different attack keeping in mind the fact that I have to go beyond that E4.

So the type of attack or onset will determine your tone and placement and ability to bridge?

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I think I get it. When I am first practicing a song with a lower pitch and the song moves upward into middle area

I usually have to pause and regroup around E4 . But after I go through the song I can do it without pausing because I start the song with a different attack keeping in mind the fact that I have to go beyond that E4.

So the type of attack or onset will determine your tone and placement and ability to bridge?

Exactly.

Well, done, grasshopper. Now, you may leave the temple.

In so many words, yes. How you are onsetting or attacking the note sets the stage for amount of induction, breath pressure, and resonance.

I think, too, that dampened or lower larynx doesn't mean you should feel heavy. It is an auditory effect. The note can still "feel" light, so to speak, but sound "boomy" or covered, depending on the overtones present. Theoretically, lowering the larynx allows more room for whatever low overtones you have. So, you may not sound like Robert Lunte, but you will sound like you, with whatever overtones your own voice produces. It also introduces some stability.

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i think it's important (with all due respect to rob) for folks to not get too literal with the popular meaning of the word "dampened" as this word can mean things not always related to actual descent...

we're simply training the larynx to lower and stay lower during phonation (when called for).

it's a great thing to be able to control your larynx and just this ability and strength to keep it low (not jam it down) but keep it from rising will help with all aspects of your singing...

what i suggest also is to get in front of a mirror, (so you can see it lowering) and simply yawn it down, inhale it down, (like smelling a fragrant flower) and get used to that feeling.

also doing any of those exercises like gug, woo, buh, while keeping the larynx lowered provides a nice workout of those muscles.

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Well, "chocolate" probably shouldn't be that helpful, it was just a descriptive word... but "theatery" seems to capture the point well.

Nah, the chocolate thing actually did help. Not sure why, but it does. With theatery, you tend to think of Ethel Merman or something. But it didn't hit me that way. It meant "boomy bottom". Not to be confused with "Booty" in the Arceneux thread...

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Quality stuff, once again. I dig your delivery. Your enthusiasm comes across as genuine, and not exaggerated to the point of coming off like a silly late night infomercial salesman, which gives it a "person to person" feel.

Keep up the good work.

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Oh great, thanks for the feedback. I have some more coming soon... have spent a lot of time on them this summer. There are also 8 more lectures in the training system. It has expanded from 22 to 30 lectures, including a more formal presentation on the benefits of the dampened larynx.

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