Jump to content

Vocal Software???

Rate this topic


PalmTreeRocker
 Share

Recommended Posts

  • Administrator

Ive heard of such products and i could be wrong, but most of these are kinda lame are they not? Why dont you purchase a DVD or book training system from one of the instructors on this web site? Such as; myself, Dena, Jeannie, Judy, and there are others...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

First invest in the voice, then in the goodies. Any monkey can get their voice modified and hide their mistakes or buy a really expensive mic and sound beter in it. Only those who are smart take that money and instead get their voice to sound as good as with the fixing without having to buy that expensive stuff.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Administrator

Software? Get real lessons with a reputable voice teacher and if you cant afford that, then at least purchase a training system from a reputable author/producer of vocal training systems. Dont just buy a book... buy a system that gives you workouts and video tutorials.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Accurate music hearing software is readily available (mine was under $60), and easy to use. It's much easier to learn accurate hearing than good singing. With better understanding of hearing, these skills are immediately transferable to better singing.

For example, I improved my tempo and when to come in by the "beats" section of the software.

The interactive pitch lessons made me aware that my singing pitch was not as accurate as preferred.

I have a controversial book written by an opera teacher in the early 1900s "On Singing". Basically, he recommends not singing in the first two years of learning how to sing, and instead, he recommends a lot of listening to voices and music.

Interactive hearing software would help you to sing better.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Chen, in The old world Opera singing , vocalist were not allowed to sing anything other then vowels there first three years, nor start learning score until there seventh year. Big difference these days lol also more competitive on the business end. Back then you really had to be chosen to become a protege and it became ones life. much more available to the general public now.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

while that goes for the opera world it certainly not goes beyond that. Opera has a sound ideal, has a striving for perfection, and sees perfection as beauty. However a Luther Vandross might not have that sound ideal, but I like to listen to him at least as much as a Gigli. (I like both Opera and other styles of music).

So to me it's quite stoopid to say that that would produce beter singers. Unless you define the worth of a singer by his technique.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Elrathion, Those are Chens views. While I certainly think Opera holds a specific ideal and traits I in no way think it is any more or less as an artistic venue nor harder once the developement is complete. It does require more specific maintance. Just preferance There are great vocalist in all venues, although I do think in other venues most are as skilled as Vandross either. In each venue there are those more technically proficient and those not. a good recording artist however is not the same as a good vocalist/performer. Some just don't deliver well live. Mr. Vandross always did!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't know; I personally think that a high percentage (perhaps 30%+) of singing entertainment has to do with the singer's listening skills. I know when I started, I had a terrible voice; yet, audiences were entertained. It was principally because I could interpret the songs well. So, I thought about where I learned this--it's because I grew up with a lot of music; and instinctively knew how to interpret the songs.

The learning approaches--where they focused on listening first--was in great part because they wanted the students to understand why and how certain singers were loved; and to soak up the feelings of the songs, methods, music interaction, the liberal arts education, etc.

It is said that Elvis wasn't really that bright of a guy; but what's further known about him is that he had a lot of songs knowledge--very good voice but terrific listener and interpreter.

Generally, it's not the great voice that's entertaining; it's the great interpreter.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

re. old-school rules about only singing vowels: A friend of a friend went to India in the 1970s to learn Karnatic singing and was allowed only one NOTE for the first year. When tone and breath were perfectly stable, the rest of the scale was permitted... I also heard that Monserrat Caballe was allowed only breathing exercises for her first year at conservatory, no singing at all; she continued to do 45 min. breath work every day throughout her career. This could all be folklore but certainly in sync with the concept from new book "outliers" about mastery of ANY skill taking around 10,000 hours of practice ...

party on, dudes

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Joanna, when I was performing full time I did about 30 mins a day just on breathing exercises and breath control, one hour + of scales daily and would usually run part or half a score prior to the performance for warm up. not unusual, also not unusual to pratice the climax points with the high b, high c 30 or 40 times in a work-out learning an aria. In operatic alignment the voice can really do much more then most people would think. It also takes more maintainance then most people realize lol In reality what you posted above makes sense to me as all notes are the same. When developed the register changes almost vanish it is just a musical assignment of pitch that changes with no great movement or shifts in position ( rock and other material is different) thats why the larynx can remain in lowered position the entire time.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I proudly own both Robert's TVS system as well as Jamie's Raise your voice and love them both...it's Jamie's Vocal Coach software that got me thinking about another avenue of learning. Can't wait for that to come out!

I like the idea of "hearing" software as well so thank you for that suggestion. I guess what I was looking for were additional sources of learning & analyzing music and how it applies to vocal training.

Thanks!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's not software but one thing that has helped me for training my ear is Musicians Institute Ear Training for the Contemporary Musician book. The book is chocked full of exercises. I am only part of the way into the book but I know my ear is getting better. I still have a ways to go but I can see progress.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 weeks later...
  • 3 weeks later...

Jaime!! How very kul :) pant pant :) waiting uhm, somewhat patiently for your SW the although my time in front of a PC is limited..:) Mr. Steven, "Sing and See"?? do you have a link in the meantime whilst we wait for Jaimes program??????

Rychemaiden: Google is your friend. :cool: I did a search for "Sing and See" and the top entry was

http://www.singandsee.com/

Which is where you can get the software. $59 retail. Follow the 'Singer' links.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...