Jump to content

Yet another screaming thread

Rate this topic


cmsuter
 Share

Recommended Posts

I have been a singer for 5 or so years, and consider myself to be a pretty competent singer, but i've mostly been in rock bands and i very much enjoy a good scream. I have tried and tried over the years to learn but I am just missing something.

To my understanding, at first, while your muscles get used to it, you will feel some discomfort, possibly even a little pain, but if the pain is excessive then you're doing it wrong. My question is, how do I know what is normal and if I'm doing it wrong? I mean, pain is pain and I unfortunately dont have anyone who can just hear/watch me and tell me what I'm doing wrong.

I've heard a lot that lower screams are easier, yet when i try to go low, it just hurts more. below is an example of what I'm going for, which to me sounds like someone who has really perfected his craft so I'm not expecting to be that good right away. I guess I'm just a little frustrated because I've tried for so long and i just cant figure out what I'm doing wrong. Help me!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Disclaimer: Generally rasp isn't healthy if it isn't natural, but it's your risks you take.

Low and high screams are the most dangerous for your muscles. There's no guarantee that you will be able to growl off the bat. Middle rasps are the best to learn distortion on, because it's the easiest to isolate your vocal cords. If you can rasp in the middle really well, then you can slowly bend the rasp lower, or jump to a growl configuration, and you should see a significant decrease in the strain.

It's important to realize that a middle rasp isn't gonna turn into what you want, but the better you get at rasping, the less your voice is going to strain in the extreme parts, which will lead you to finding the right sounds.

If you try this and it hurts more than what you normally do. stop D:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I find it interesting that very often when guys here want to learn distortion, they want to use it for death metal-type vocals, i.e. vocals where you hear the distortion, but not really any melody underneath it. Compare that to f.ex. the heavy metal of the 70s and 80s, when rock singers often sang "raspy" but sang very memorable melodies - and that was also much harder to do.

DoverOs, where do you get those facts, if I may ask?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yeah i wonder that to :) high screams are usually more dangerous, highnotes in general are more dangerous. They wear out your folds more Than low notes the reason women pays more visits to ents and are at alot higher chance of getting vocaldamage.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I find it interesting that very often when guys here want to learn distortion, they want to use it for death metal-type vocals, i.e. vocals where you hear the distortion, but not really any melody underneath it. Compare that to f.ex. the heavy metal of the 70s and 80s, when rock singers often sang "raspy" but sang very memorable melodies - and that was also much harder to do.

DoverOs, where do you get those facts, if I may ask?

Experience I guess. I'm assuming this guy is in the same boat as me, then our low growls have more trouble getting the cords in the proper configuration.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

yeah i'm more of a singer, but the band i'm in could use the occasional scream and i just cant figure out what i'm doing wrong. everytime i try to do it, i cant help but close up my throat and i end up pushing with my cords, which i know is a no no.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I agree with Rob Lunte that a lot of these vocalists are really one dimensional, but on the other hand, a lot of them aren't. I definitely disagree with the widespread notion that it is just a fad. Rock n roll is just a fad. Perotin was told polyphony was a fad. I think the forum could use more screamers.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm a big fan of bands that combine screaming and singing, but I've never been able to scream and sing back and forth. Screaming would wreck my clean singing; I guess I must've been doing it wrong ;) Also I think some people have naturally more resilient vocal folds that can take more pressure. All I can say is, good luck!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I was doing the screaming thing for the past 10 years or so. Borrowed a lot of tone/phrasing from guys like Phil Anselmo, Randy Blythe and Chad Gray. It took me a long time to 'get it'. I'm not going to give ANY advice on actual technique, because I'm not a teacher and I wouldn't want anything I've done to injure someone else.

Melissa Cross' DVD's, The Art Of Screaming helped quite a bit. There are some good warm-ups in those. Doesn't cover everything, but it's a great basis. For me personally, it's 75% support system with a very open throat. If I'm not warmed up, it'll kill any form of clean singing power I have.

One cool benefit of doing this for years is that it really helped me on my bridging, from chest to head to falsetto. I'm not sure how a lot of other screamers approach it, but whenever I'm getting up there in the high range, it's all head voice and falsetto. With the right amount of hydration, mic technique and support, it works for me.

(A live clip from a former band I sang in)

Very bored of that style of singing now, back to my roots as a die hard Alice In Chains and Queensryche fan!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...