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Upper range loss

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karimfantom
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1, not all opera teachers are narrow minded. 2, If by alto you mean contralto, contraltos can sing soprano ranges in many cases, but it's not the most mature part of their voice and soprano roles don't work well.

Now here's what you do when singing classical style. Always keep your mouth neutral, never sing with the mouth. In the mouth area, only move your lips wider as you reach higher notes. Your vibrato/tone/lowered larynx/raised palate, ALL come into play with the onset of your diaphragm. You always sing from your diaphragm and your throat, not with your mouth.

This is all for chest voice. Head voice works a bit differently.

If your high chest notes are tight, it means you are constricting your voice, because you aren't singing solely from your diaphragm. Above your A4, you might have slight pressure to add, but it's completely useless to attempt that if you don't have perfect support everywhere else.

If you need an exercise, try to produce a whisper soft "Ay", without any mouth pressure, and then try to amplify it while lowering the larynx and avoiding using your mouth for the vowel.

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my mask is perfectly fine. I'm fully aware of the basic fundamentals of singing.

my chest notes are not strained at all. my throat feels tight only after singing above my second passaggio.

anyway, your grammar is atrocious and obviously I sing Ay's when I do warmups like every other normal person.

I found a blog from a thread on this forum.

http://singersvoice.wordpress.com/2012/09/06/a-good-tone-for-singing/

I have a "pressed tone" and THAT is my problem.

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my mask is perfectly fine. I'm fully aware of the basic fundamentals of singing.

my chest notes are not strained at all. my throat feels tight only after singing above my second passaggio.

anyway, your grammar is atrocious and obviously I sing Ay's when I do warmups like every other normal person.

I found a blog from a thread on this forum.

http://singersvoice.wordpress.com/2012/09/06/a-good-tone-for-singing/

I have a "pressed tone" and THAT is my problem.

Not trying to be rude, but if you strain above your second passaggio, it does mean your chest notes ARE strained. I'm a spinto baritone and I don't get slight constriction until my high notes which are g4 and g#4.

If you sing from your throat and diaphragm, there is no mask and there is no strain in the upper part of your throat. The only strain is very far back and low in your throat, where you are actually singing from. Singing from mask means your voice has some natural function of diaphragm support, but your muscles are raised too much in your throat, and prevent the diaphragm from taking charge.

You can be a bass or tenor, or any other vocal class, and still sing from your mouth, no matter what tone you exemplify.

If it really is the problems of the vocal cords, I really can't help more than this because I'm not an authority on correct vocal function and health. But this is correct technique for classical style.

If you really think that any great opera singer sings from a high place in their voice, then that's completely wrong. If you look at muscle use in opera singers, it's extremely resonant with very little muscle action, because they are using the low resonant space of their throat. If a singer can get away with using a high place in their voice, it's because their support is naturally higher sounding.

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