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I am worried because my head voice sounds breathy....

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voc-al
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Hey Guys,

I am a bit worried. My head voice sounds really breathy, as if the vocal folds are closing completely or rather correctly... I also read a few posts online that talk about how dangerous breathy singing is to the vocal cords because it means since they are not closing properly, and I want to make a sound, I send a lot more air to them then needed...

I dont know if its any indication, but i dont seem to have this problem when doing lip bubbles and tongue trills. The last time i noticed this was today doing Mums..

Anyone have a solution for this one?

Thanks.

VA

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Post a clip brother..

Sure thing bro ;)

Sound clip of Mums and Nays. You will hear the breathiness in the Nays for sure...

Thanks for the support guys.

In the recording it doesn't sound that breathy, but in my head, I hear it as if my vocal folds are not closing correctly.

I wish I had the funds for a vocal coach. Currently all I have is singing for the stars by seth riggs, and youtube videos... I am practicing 1 hour per day and resting on Saturdays.. Been doing it for 2 weeks now. When I noticed the breathy singing, I googled it and found this article about how dangerous it is to the vocal cords, so that is why I was worried.

What exercises do you recommend?

Thanks,

VA

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Sure thing bro ;)

Sound clip of Mums and Nays. You will hear the breathiness in the Nays for sure...

Thanks for the support guys.

Hi, voc-al! Neither clip is breathy. As a first exercise, take what you are doing and keep the intensity up for the descending part of the arpeggio. That will help to build some consistency.

2nd exercise, to build a firmer tone, add to both exercises the vowel EH, as in Echo. so... Meh, and Neh.

I think you will be pleased with how much more sound you get, and how nicely it feels.

I hope this is helpful.

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I agree with Steve. Also remember that your voice sounds different when you sing, especially in head voice . It is always better to listen to a recording of yourself than to go by your ear when singing. This is one of the reasons practicing with a PA system is so awesome because when it is loud enough, you hear about what you sound like.

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Singing involves a lot of skills.

More than most people realize.

I wouldn't panic so much at this stage.

2 weeks is barely enough time to build your voice.

Some aspects of singing include:

Rhythm training

Alignment/posture

Breathing

Resonance

Onsets/Linking

Diction

Ear training (for transcribing music by ear)

Solfege (for singing acapella)

Piano/guitar/whatever (to accompany your singing)

Music theory

Each one of these can take a long time (and I'm sure there's more).

So good luck with everything.

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Singing involves a lot of skills.

More than most people realize.

I wouldn't panic so much at this stage.

2 weeks is barely enough time to build your voice.

Some aspects of singing include:

Rhythm training

Alignment/posture

Breathing

Resonance

Onsets/Linking

Diction

Ear training (for transcribing music by ear)

Solfege (for singing acapella)

Piano/guitar/whatever (to accompany your singing)

Music theory

Each one of these can take a long time (and I'm sure there's more).

So good luck with everything.

Guys, thanks for the reply.

I have been doing singing for the stars for 2 weeks. I have been singing most of my life. Had 2 vocal coaches in the past. One, was a year at a music school about 10 years ago, and then 2 years ago, i did a couple of els singing with an sls vocal trainer. The reason I was worried is because singing is not new to me, and I want to make sure its not something that needs to be seen by a ENT specialist.

Now regarding what Steve and Keith said: In the Nays, even in the recording in the last two arpeggios i dont hear it as very airy. You dont hear it?

Thanks again for the awesome support!

VA

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I didn't hear it being too airy. You just sound like a beginner. No biggie. I ALWAYS hear my voice as breathy until I record it. If you think you are being breathy, put a candle in front of your mouth when you sing. The flame should barely move. If you blow it out, you are using too much air. Getting closure in head voice takes time, and the proper exercises.

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I didn't hear it being too airy. You just sound like a beginner. No biggie. I ALWAYS hear my voice as breathy until I record it. If you think you are being breathy, put a candle in front of your mouth when you sing. The flame should barely move. If you blow it out, you are using too much air. Getting closure in head voice takes time, and the proper exercises.

Got it. Thanks!

If you dont mind, I have another question.

How do I know at what pitch I should stop the exercise? For example, at a certain pitch, I might need to bend a bit to make it, but then the next one, is like the top top limit of my cords, and it sounds as if I am ruining my cords. Also, after the full workout, it feels like a soar throat, just where the neck connects to the body. In that V. So, should I stop way before I even start the bending? How will the range increase if I just do what ever I am used to or feels comfortable. That part is really confusing.

Thanks again! :)

VA

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voc - If you want to extend your range higher you've got to be careful not to strain too much. Just go up to the highest comfortable note, and then one 1/2 step higher. Do that only once per day. Make sure you are supporting (a lot) on that last high note - letting your abs take the brunt of the work, not the folds. You need to also accompany this with the right vowel formation.

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Here is a thought.

What If I use ear plugs, so that way I can do it real quiet, will that cause less air pressure? I don't think I know how to control the air pressure going to the folds. Although in my mind I think opposite.. If I hear only air, it might be that I am not sending enough air, but in reality its probably the opposite.. I am sending, and too much.

So, should I use ear plugs, or put hands on my ears, or even a headset?

VA

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There may be nothing wrong with it. If you ask me, you should not put restrictions on your ears when practicing. Pitch control rely's on an ear-brain-muscle feedback loop that needs to be unimpaired.

But to me, something weird happens sometimes. After a while of doing bubbles or other exercises, my ears get blocked when i reach the high notes.. Its like i would i would pinch my nose, and close my mouth, and draw pressure in. Instead of equalizing pressure like you do in high altitude, just the opposite. That is the block I get when I sing high notes after a while.. Weird, and bothersome...

I know, I have some weird issues ;)

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voc-al: That maneuver you are describing is not needed at all when singing. Are you singing with your Eustachian tubes open, so that the sound is REALLY LOUD in your head? In order to hear music around you, its better to let them be shut, and hear your own voice from the outside air, just like all the other sounds.

I hope this is helpful.

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Hey Guys.

I just found something that might be valubale to my training process.

Back about 11 years ago, i went to a music school and did vocal training for 1 year. I probobly had the airy issue back then, but I dont recall it. Anyways, I found a note from a larygologist and also a picture of my folds.

The note reads and I quote. "The opening in the back of the folds is probobly due to his stresful personality."

Never knew I was stressful ;) Anyways, I am attaching the photo with hopes to get a better understanding on what excercises will close this bothersome gap I have when singing high notes.

http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/545/vocalfolds0001.jpg/

Thanks

VA

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That maneuver you are describing is not needed at all when singing. Are you singing with your Eustachian tubes open, so that the sound is REALLY LOUD in your head? In order to hear music around you, its better to let them be shut, and hear your own voice from the outside air, just like all the other sounds.

I hope this is helpful.

Say what? Eustachian tubes open? You mean I should be manipulating them? I dont do it on purpose. It happens after a while of training bubbles or trills or nays or anything...

VA.

voc-al: No, I do not mean you should be manipulating them, but I do mean that its better to sing with them shut. Its much easier to hear other sounds around you when they are.

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What about the picture of the folds i put up?

voc-al: it was 11 years ago. Old news. Your current voice does not sound breathy.

If, however, it still _feels_ breathy to you, and you cannot sustain a note beyond about 5 seconds, its possible the posterior gap is still there.

When it occurs, it is caused by adduction without the posterior 'locking' of the vocal process performed by the interarytenoids. THere is a simple test for it: Soft, low-range vocal frys and a few soft glottal attacks will reveal if you have an insufficiency, or just a habit.

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Funny thing is, I can't manage vocal fry... Tried and tried and can't get it. Only early early in the morning I was able to. Right after waking up.. now? No chance...

Glotal attacks mean?

I am interested to know if the gap issue is still there.

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You really should try to get voice lessons.

Without knowing what you're doing, you could end up hurting your voice.

If you can't afford a lesson every week, then at

least get lessons on Skype whenever you can.

There are teachers that give one-off lessons.

I'm sure a lesson or two from Robert Lunte would help

iron out some issues.

If you need exercises, you can also buy "Singing Exercises for Dummies".

They cover all the main aspects of singing. But nothing can replace having

voice lessons.

Singing takes time. Even with the right exercises, it can take weeks or months before

you improve significantly. You've only been practicing for a few weeks. Without the

proper coordination (from daily training), you're likely to run into a lot of problems.

Anyway, good luck.

Here is a Youtube clip I found that might be relevant:

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