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Is this Unusual / Weird?

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iwillbecomeagoodsinger
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I can only sing up to middle C, D with my chest voice (or maybe mix voice I can't tell if I'm in my mix voice or not though). Anything after Middle D, I have to sing with my head voice.

Is this unusual? Or normal for a beginner singer? What key do you guys go into your head voice at?

Sidebar: I can sing two different pitches on the same scale and they are both on key. For example, I can sing middle C with a bit lower voice and its on key, and then I can sing the exact same scale with a higher voice and its still on key. When I say I can only sing up to middle D with my chest / mix voice, it is when I'm singing using my higher voice on the same scale. I don't know which pitch I'm singing in is the correct pitch for the middle scale, regardless, both are on key. Maybe I should post some audio examples? Anyways, I hope that makes sense! :)

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Change your username bro! How could you become a good singer if you keep that mindset? A positive attitude is a must to achieve success in this craft, ask anybody here. Singing is mental.

How bout "iwillbeagoodsingersomeday"? lol

Post an audio example definitely. I'm almost positive you are talking about octaves on that last part. But we need to know which octaves, so let's hear it.

Even if it happens to be that you actually can't go higher than middle C or D with chest voice, that's totally normal for a beginner. I remember when simply a D was a struggle. I think going through puberty shrunk my range at the same time, but any normal person can also start out with a really small range. In that case, their range isn't actually small by genetic law, they just haven't learned how to use the rest of it.

Thanks for the reply! And its just a username, doesn't really refelect my actual views and attitude towards singing. I'm not very good at the moment, but I know I will become good with time and hard work. To be honest, I could really care less about my username... SO I will deff. change it :) I don't know how though. :(

Anyways, Here's the audio file:

http://www24.online-convert.com/download-file/5d1fac582501473cfc8dd8e40d285084/converted-ea5dfffa.mp3

It's recorded with a very bad webcam mic, so my voice sounds a lot different at times. But the point is.. I sing one lower pitched scale, and the second higher. Both are on key. I don't know which one is for the actual middle C scale. I'm thinking the second one is for the middle c scale and the first one is for the scale below it. Thoughts? :)

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You're singing across 2 octaves. The first scale is C3 - C4 (middle C) and the second scale is C4 (middle C) - C5 (Top C)

Thank you so much! Yeah, I always thought the first one was a scale lower.

I can only sing upto D4 with my chest / mixed voice. Is this normal for a beginner? What do you / experienced singers sing up to in there chest / mixed voice?

When I sing upto D4 I can't tell if I'm singing in my chest voice or mixed voice. Infact I can't tell when I sing in my mix voice at all. Do you know any tips to help me know when I'm in my mixed voice? Also, (sorry for all the questions) should I be able to sing higher than D4 (without going into my head voice) if I sing in my mix voice?

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The file isn't working anymore...

I personally invite you, before you dive in too deep, to do away with the term mixed voice. Not because it doesn't exist, but because no one can agree on the same definition for it. Some will narrow the vowel at the top of their chest voice and sound all strainy and thin and call that mixed voice, others will go straight into head voice with a speech-like character and call that mixed voice, others are really singing directly between chest and head voice, others claim it's a split resonance, it goes on and on.

It's not like 3 separate registers, chest, mix, and head. There are people that teach it that way and in my personal opinion that is the way that confuses beginners.

It's more like, you have chest voice, head voice, and you learn to mix them in varying degrees. That's closest to how it really works scientifically.

What we are sure of is that mixed voice does not exist naturally except in a rare few individuals. For like 95% of the population, it needs to be trained. So if you are just starting out, that D4 is probably just chest voice.

Thanks for the reply and info, before I begin... Do you know how to change a username? :) I'd like to change mine.

I see the term "mix" / "mix voice" as a mix between or chest and head voice that when used allows you to sing higher notes than in your chest voice. Am I correct?

By mixing the two, does it allow you to sing in higher notes without going into your head voice?

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Sorry to bump this thread, but I'm really curious... When do ya'll start going into your head voice on the keyboard? I start going into my headvoice after D4

To the best of my knowledge it differs slightly between different voice types.

The lower your speaking voice is the lower on the keyboard your voice will want to transition.

I can say for me personally it's E4.

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Yes, it does vary from person to person. For me, it's F#4.

And yes, iamnotagoodsinger, I would recommend a name change. It reflects obvious negative feelings you have toward your voice/singing, and really doesn't do you any good mentally.

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Owen, I get what you're saying about mix voice might confuse some people, but there are things within every vocal pedagoy that will confuse people. I think people's problem is more that they have a hard time DOING mix voice. But essentially, mixed voice isn't confusing at all. Let's put aside what actually happens in the body for a moment, how many registers there are and so forth. Let's just look at it this way: Most beginning singers have thick low notes which you could call chest voice and thin high notes which you could call head voice. They experience a break in the area where those two voices meet because they don't make a GRADUAL change from chest voice to head. In this break area, which many people talk about as the passagio - if you can seamlessly bridge between the two voices, you have sort of a "mix" between head voice and chest voice. That's really what it is, in its basic form.

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Yes, it does vary from person to person. For me, it's F#4.

And yes, iamnotagoodsinger, I would recommend a name change. It reflects obvious negative feelings you have toward your voice/singing, and really doesn't do you any good mentally.

1. I don't have negative feelings towards my voice / singing. I have realistic "feelings". I know that I'm currently not a good singer. But will eventually become a good singer with time.

2. Doesn't do me any good mentally? It's just a username on an internet forum. I'm not sitting here pondering and thinking about my username and telling myself I'll never become a good singer.

Again, its just a username. And since multiple people requested that I change it, I gladly will. But at the end of the day I could care less what my username is.

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  • Administrator

@Owen (and any other members)

Regarding a change in your username(s) >>>

Yes, drop me a "shout" if you wish to make a change. Let me know what name you wish to use, and consider it DONE !!! I'd be pleased to assist you.

@Ron

Thank you for your kind words, my Friend ! I definitely take your words as a compliment :)

Hope all is well with you !!!

Sincere Regards,

Adolph

:cool:

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@Owen (and any other members)

Regarding a change in your username(s) >>>

Yes, drop me a "shout" if you wish to make a change. Let me know what name you wish to use, and consider it DONE !!! I'd be pleased to assist you.

@Ron

Thank you for your kind words, my Friend ! I definitely take your words as a compliment :)

Hope all is well with you !!!

Sincere Regards,

Adolph

:cool:

Hello Mr. Namlik. I sent you an email to your chief e-mail requesting a name change. If you didn't get it for whatever reason, could you change my username to "iwillbecomeagoodsinger"? Without the quotations and question mark obviously.

Thanks! :)

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iwillbecomeagoodsinger

The change has been made. If for some reason it didn't work, please let me know.

No, I didn't get your email. I'm currently having problems with my ISP.... For awhile, I will be using a new email address until I can get the problem resolved >>> chief188.88@gmail.com

Oh, call me "Adolph" please :cool:

If I can be of any further assistance, please don't hesitate to write !

Warmest Regards,

Adolph

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Most untrained males are typically break somewhere around D4-F4. Before I trained, my highest comfortable non-falsetto note was about D4-Eb4 depending on the time of day. The important thing to remember is that breaks are only a temporary thing. It doesn't really matter where you break. What matters is learning how to smooth out that break and get into your upper register.

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Now, I can respond. Am I childish for wanting the name-change? Maybe so. Maybe I'm the one teaching the lesson. So, go ahead and try and punish me. :D

Nice to meet you iwillbecomeagoodsinger.

the actual region of passaggio may vary slightly from singer to singer and vary slightly depending on what vowel. Lunte first teaches bridging from chest to head on the eh sound. Kind of makes sense. it is a vowel that is halfway between the lowest intonaton and the highest. Perfect for mixing. When I say region, I don't mean a physical place. I mean a tuning, configuration, formant, that supports the resonance of tones with in it's capability. And the passaggio is the tricky spot in changing places of resonance, as well as, in some cases, what to do with breath and adduction.

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