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Vocal Placement, Pitch, and Tone

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yuutokun
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I'm a vocalist who has been struggling to get my voice to it's potential but I think I have quite a few hangups on the basics due to all the contradicting information that's our there.

What I'd like to know today is where do you feel the pressure in your mouth?

I've long since stopped using my throat to sing, so my voice doesn't get tired and I don't experience any pain or anything, but I'm not sure where to aim my voice so that my pitch won't suffer and my tone will sound best.

I've read about things such as singing in the mask, but I find that concept too abstract to apply it.

Do you place the pressure against your soft palate or your hard palate. And if its the hard palate is it in the dome part or the flat part in front of the teeth. Does the placement change based on style and pitch?

I am singing in a screamo band and while my shouts are quite good, I suffer alot with powerful and non-pitchy vocals. If anyone could lay things out for me in an easy to understand fashion, that would be very much appreciated.

I plan to upload a recording of me singing sometime in the near future.

Thank you:)

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placement is so callled because you 'place' the tone. You can't actually physically 'place' the tone but you can make alterations with your tongue, mouth soft palette ect so that you FEEL vibrations/resonance in certain areas. Singing in the mask basically means adjusting your vocal tract so that you feel buzzing in your lips and as you get higher behind your nose. The reason it's called singing in the mask is because you feel the vibrations in the same places as if you had a mask on your face.

The thing to realise is that everyone can feel this differently. Say I was singing an C4 with a 'forward placement' and felt a buzz in my lips. This is not necessarily how you would feel is. 'Aiming' your voice is a mental aid that will hopefully produce the desired results. Imagery is key with a lot of singing techniques.

Personally (and slow sirens is a good way to practice this) I 'think' of the sound as forward and buzzing lips when i'm singing in my chest voice, then as I start to get to my bridge and head voice I think of the placement of the sound going back. As I get higher, this automatically makes me make space in the back of my throat (including lifting the soft pal) instead of a more forward 'splatty' sound.

Yes, placement can differ from style to style.

I hope this has helped a little bit :D

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if you are a d.i.y. singer, you will have to work this out for yourself over time.

what you do with the air once it passes the vocal folds has a lot to do with finding that special place, that special pocket the air needs to go..per note, per vowel, throughout your entire range.

it takes a lot of experimentation, hard work, and most of all patience.

if you learn to experiment you will find the voice (in association with the mind) actually comes in to help you find these places (per your particular vocal makeup).

yes, your voice wants to help you, if you are able to let it.....

it comes when you are free, relaxed, and open, and aren't trying to make the voice "do anything."

obviously, there a hell of a lot more to this, but start to grasp this as a mental image.

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I'm a vocalist who has been struggling to get my voice to it's potential but I think I have quite a few hangups on the basics due to all the contradicting information that's our there.

What I'd like to know today is where do you feel the pressure in your mouth?

I've long since stopped using my throat to sing, so my voice doesn't get tired and I don't experience any pain or anything, but I'm not sure where to aim my voice so that my pitch won't suffer and my tone will sound best.

I've read about things such as singing in the mask, but I find that concept too abstract to apply it.

Do you place the pressure against your soft palate or your hard palate. And if its the hard palate is it in the dome part or the flat part in front of the teeth. Does the placement change based on style and pitch?

I am singing in a screamo band and while my shouts are quite good, I suffer alot with powerful and non-pitchy vocals. If anyone could lay things out for me in an easy to understand fashion, that would be very much appreciated.

I plan to upload a recording of me singing sometime in the near future.

Thank you:)

yuutokun: If you are singing with resonant vowels, and with twang, these sensations will go where they will for your particular voice, and for the particular note/vowel combination. They don't stay in 1 place only.... they move around.

Its a process of discovery, of learning what your own voice feels like when it sounds like you want it to. Until you discover these sensations, you cannot reproduce them, or use them to help in the discovery.

However, there are fairly easily used ways to discover the sensations: Semi occluded voiced consonants.

Take the consonant 'th' as in the the word THE. Put a finger lightly on the bridge of your nose, and sustain this consonant, and you will very likely feel vibration in the bones of your face. Put your hand flat on the top of your head... you will feel the vibration, there, too.

Now, with the voiced TH going, form the vowels ee, ay, ah, oh, oo in your mouth, by moving your tongue behind that TH. Notice how the sensations of vibration in your mouth will change, move around, be more or less intense. Practice this slowly for about 10-15 mins a day, for a week. Day-by-day your ability to sense these vibrations will become more refined as you gain experience.

After a week, on the TH, while thinking the ee vowel, let your lower jaw drop slowly just 1/4 inch, so that the TH ends and an actual ee vowel begins. Do this with your finger lightly on the bridge of your nose.

What you will see is that the vibration you feel at the bridge of the nose is .... still there for the ee. :)

You can do the same exercise with the other vowels behind the TH, opening just enough for the vowel to appear.

I hope this is helpful.

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