Jump to content

Does Your Tone Improve Just By Singing?

Rate this topic


Overdrive
 Share

Recommended Posts

Does your voice get accustomed to the notes and then that leads to good tone, or is it much more involved then that?

I am mainly asking because I've recently gotten into mix voice, which has been absolutely necessary for singing with most every song I find (do I have a low voice or something?). I feel like I've only been singing mixed voice for maybe a week, and what I find is that (to my ears) I hit the notes ok, but it does not sound strong, and in fact it does sound strained/weak at times (I don't feel like I'm straining either). Maybe singing in this area for another week or two will get me more comfortable, and get rid of any strain and thus give the tone I want?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If it hurts, its never good. If its relaxed and easy thats good since you can MODIFY the tone. Remember there are so many ways to sing 1 note! You can sing it dopey, nasally, relaxed, strained, breathy, connected. Remember it's your VOICE listen to it and it will listen to you :D I know that sounds very cheesy but do not force the voice, LEARN your voice. Sometimes it will feel uncomfortable at first, but its like learning to walk, sometimes you're gonna fall ;) but eventually you'll be running up the stairs loool :)

Ps. When I say listen to your voice, I mean when it feels sore take a break. When it feels strong, keep experimenting! Try to FEEL what feels right.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks JayMC, yeah I think the most important thing is that it doesn't hurt. Also when I'm singing mixed voice for like 15 minutes, or maybe am trying a song that goes very high (maybe I 'pull' mix voice, is that a thing?) then some vocal fry will come up in my notes without my intention. Does this show that I'm doing something wrong, or that my voice is just getting tired and it will get over it?

Here's a quick snippet of me just now:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You're blasting air through your cords! Maybe I'm wrong? Try singing the same thing softly with little air. If you can't then there's your problem right there. When you hear Robert Lunte sing crazy vocals like that it may SEEM like there is strain but there actually isn't. It's 50% mental as someone on the forum stated before :) Rock vocalists are PROFESSIONALS at tricking the audience hahaha.

Listen to that large breath you just took, you don't need that much oxygen to sing what you just sang lol ;) try taking a baby breath and see how far it can take you. Remember to support that "baby breath."

It only takes a thimble full of air for the vocal cords to function. REMEMBER THIS. It has helped me time and time again.

PS. You took 2 large breaths lol, BUDGET YOUR AIR MAN! What if you were dying and had no oxygen left would you really be wasting that much air? Sing like its your last breath.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You're blasting air through your cords! Maybe I'm wrong? Try singing the same thing softly with little air. If you can't then there's your problem right there. When you hear Robert Lunte sing crazy vocals like that it may SEEM like there is strain but there actually isn't. It's 50% mental as someone on the forum stated before :) Rock vocalists are PROFESSIONALS at tricking the audience hahaha.

Listen to that large breath you just took, you don't need that much oxygen to sing what you just sang lol ;) try taking a baby breath and see how far it can take you. Remember to support that "baby breath."

It only takes a thimble full of air for the vocal cords to function. REMEMBER THIS. It has helped me time and time again.

PS. You took 2 large breaths lol, BUDGET YOUR AIR MAN! What if you were dying and had no oxygen left would you really be wasting that much air? Sing like its your last breath.

I think I can do it softly but it's not as comfortable and doesn't sound as good (it's "wobbly"). I think that's a support thing, something I seem to have an incessant never-ending problem with...

btw, did you notice I let out a puff of air after the first line, so that's why I needed another breath, but yeah I was trying to go for power and was taking in a lot of air. :P

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think any of the pro-er guys on the forum will tell you, more air does NOT equal more power :) I had to learn the hard way loool. Now more compression and more twang might equal more power but that does not mean MORE BREATH. Support is often that annoying thing you constantly have to work on, but its CRUCIAL it's like the engine that powers your car. Those crazy rock guys that hit well over soprano high Cs... although there is a high pressure air stream but very LITTLE air being used :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well, I'm not a pro. I don't get paid to sing and no one needs a Glenn Hughes sound-alike. Frankly, that just hurts my one last feeling. :lol:

I'm not a voice professional anything. Although I am prone to poke fun at myself and refer to my musings and viewpoints as Ron's Redneck School of Singing (and scaring small domestic animals).

I have found the need for management of breath at all levels of the singing range. Some hold back at the low end to prevent blowing out to much weight in the voice in the low end and thereby taking away from the "mix." Holding and controlling some air in the passaggio. But as I go higher, say higher than C5 - D5, it's the other direction. Full throttle, running wide open, redlining on the white line, wind in my hair, middle finger salute with my free hand, because it is my highway to Hell.

That was kind of a neat analogy, I need to write that down and keep it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...