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Speaking Voice Changing

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Hey all, I used to speak in a pure deep bassy chest voice, but I could always sing very "boyish", as in placing the voice higher. However recently I have noticed that even in hitting the same lower notes there is a bright overtone. So now when speaking even if the note is low, there is that "ng" or "ee" sound behind it. The best way to describe it is if you do head voice descending slides ALL the way down to your lowest note and you can feel the upper register even in the lower voice. It's a really cool feeling, I was just wondering if anyone else has experienced that new "colour" in the voice, even if I go down to my lowest chestiest note I can add that "brightness" (you can do it on a ng, or n, or ee).

I was wondering if anyone else has experienced this sensation? It's as if the voice is adapting to all the training, it does not want to pull chest higher so its keeping the heady sensation the whole time. Talking like this also feels way easier... minimum air... maximum volume. Keep in mind its the same note, just with more "squillo" or natural twang it feels way lighter as well. You can even hear this in Robert Lunte's voice, even if the note is low there is a natural brightness of colour which reveals itself as the headvoice comes into play.

Is this normal or am I a weirdo? :lol:

- JayMC

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No you're not weird. As a matter of fact, my speaking voice has finally improved the way I was hoping. Very similar to how you are describing. How it happened for me is that I'm now warming up with lip rolls and "ng" in the car on the way to work. And I've been working on carrying the brightness lower. My warm ups are setting up good technique for speaking even though that wasn't my original intention. This has had a huge positive impact on my speaking voice. This has happened over the last couple months.

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Is this normal or am I a weirdo? :lol:

- JayMC

JayMC: Not wierdo... you are just bringing balanced phonation down to the lower end, where ordinarily voices tend to overthicken.

If you want to have some fun with this, and develop it futher, do a siren downward with it, and then practice onsets that begin in the lower voice, but with the coordinated feeling. When you can onset in your lower voice this way any time you desire, you will find that upward sirens and arpeggios will transition very smoothly, without much effort.

When you get to the passaggio, you will feel the resonance change, but not the balance of the phonation. The sense of the resonance change, to a sensation intermediate between the lower and upper voices, is what people have been describing as mixed voice.

Then, when you get up above that, the alignment of harmonics and resonances will be a head voice pattern, which has its own timbre and sensations.

This is the technical premise of the seamless voice... that the coordination of the laryngeal muscles, when free, enables the full range, and that range will assume various sensations as the transition is made.

I hope this is helpful.

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What Steven said. Something akin to "resonant speaking."

And what I have also done is from the perspective of "train like you will fight."

I avoid fry at speaking range. Habit is habit is habit. And, for me, I think allowing fry detunes my voice. So, even at quiet volumes, I speak with a solid tone. If I start to hear some fry-ish sounds, either I am tired or need to clear my throat. But I do not allow myself to continue making that sound.

I didn't think about it until just now but doing so maybe aiding in the ability to keep proper adduction, regardless of the point in the range. Maybe. As I have said before, my voice is new to me, each day.

And, again, Steven is a genius but I am just stating the obvious.

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Steven I think I get exactly what you are saying. It's almost like being in a perpetual state of using both musculatures, thanks for the advice and I'll try my best to implement this in my vocal training.

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@videohere have you noticed that if you can successfully do the descending slide all the way down right through to your lowest chest tone that those "low" notes have a totally different feeling?

How would you recommend doing the slides for someone just starting out such as myself?

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Bob could you shortly describe the descending slide exercise that you're doing? For example how much do you allow the voice to transition from head into chest musculature and how light / hard are you leaning into the headvoice to start with?

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