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Ratio of Training Upper/Lower Register

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Hey all, at certain times it feels like training the lower register is actually counterproductive to what I want to achieve. Assuming you are the typical male student with an "overpowered" lower register and a frail upper register.

What is the ideal ratio of training these parts of the voice? Once you get to those "money notes" (passaggio) the sensations need to change but that cannot happen if we are pulling the lower register up!

What is your approach to training the higher and lower register? To ultimately achieve the freedom to pass through both of them with gracefulness and ease. Now for females you may have the reverse problem but feel free to share that as well :)

- JayMC

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I really like doing this particular thing when warming up or exercising...

I start at a really low register...

for me it seems that there is a register below chest voice that is like a really low chest voice with a lot of power

then i actually drag that up through chest range, and all the way into head range, and get a really nice full sound

This sort of trains the high and the low at the same time I've learned, just try to hold on to that 'sound' you get from the lower notes, and don't lose it at the top.

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Lord_Adon, that's some cool stuff and it's funny because my music teacher who is soprano (high voice) says that training the lower register helps her a lot. I don't think it is "darkening" the voice, I think it feels like "maintaining" that resonant darkness of sound from that "low chest" register all the way up which almost EMPOWERS the higher register. Very cool approach Lord_Adon, thanks for that info. Maintaining your twang configuration in the low-voice also helps "train both" as you said. For example instead of using AHHH for the low note, switch the same note to an EEE, the darkness is STILL there but the overtone of head voice is starting to make its way in.

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I think it feels like "maintaining" that resonant darkness of sound from that "low chest" register all the way up which almost EMPOWERS the higher register. Very cool approach Lord_Adon, thanks for that info. Maintaining your twang configuration in the low-voice also helps "train both" as you said. For example instead of using AHHH for the low note, switch the same note to an EEE, the darkness is STILL there but the overtone of head voice is starting to make its way in.

I agree. I don't know if there is such a thing as 'darkening' the voice. Maybe it's just keeping the voice from 'lightening' lol.

I don't know about twang configuration, but yea it really does work... Vowels I usually use are just the most difficult ones, helps train where you aren't quite comfortable enough I guess.

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I don't know what program you've been using (if any) but according to Anthony Frisell (whose book I highly recommend) you should start out training the headvoice primarily, in a mostly descending fashion to ensure the weight of the chest voice is not carried up. He also offers a couple chest voice exercises that he says won't interfere with the development of the headvoice - and ultimately - the mixed voice. He also advises training headvoice as low as Bb3, if not lower to create overlap between the registers.

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I usually start with comfortable humming, "ng," straw, lip bubbles. Then some more open "ah" in my lower range (Bb2-Bb3) then I start from the top down with a pure head voice on "oo" and work that downwards.

I think it's all very personal, and depends on where you are in your vocal development. If you're a self-taught singer like me, then what you did 3 months ago might make no sense now, and what you're doing now will not work forever. When you can't afford 100$/hour lessons you have to read a lot, listen a lot, watch a lot, and practise your ass off!

But like anything in life, I think consistency is the key. Day after day, putting in the time and effort and concentration to make it happen. It's all well and good to make excuses but no work = no results period

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