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We all want better resonance! Using good technique with breath, tones and humming we can get it! It takes correct sounds on the breath and daily practice. Want to know more? H

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At TVS we use a very buzzy kinda humming..well it takes the sound directly into the high resonator to produce great overtones. This gives a very edgy/in front sound to each vowel.

here is a video http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CCF1a2P0bCU this is really helpful to make the very beauty of the voice alive. I also find the Jeannie Deva video very interesting...how to simply get the resonant very horizontal..very in front of your mouth

Lot of fun here:-)

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Yeah Ale.....we all have a little tip here and there that adds to the richness. I use gentle tones coming from "deep inside" and using the hum in the resonators increasing power in all tones. This comes through with the breath support in place.

OOH is very directional, AAh the most open and EHH I believe the strongest for bridging & siren and head power...I think this is where I differ but I'm not training Rock singer athletes like you guys at TVS! I have a gentle approach! love H:)

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When I'm working with gentle singers...not so rock and more into pop or folk..I just let them find the right resonance starting from their speech..I mean..the first secret is to learn what resonance means in everybody's day life.

When you start using overtones in the high resonators while speeching you're just halfway to heaven:-)

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All,

I can tell this is going to be a lively discussion ;)

Just to refresh my memory on how he discusses and demonstrates this, I watched Robert's video on the buzz: the 'do' and the 'do not' are profoundly different sounds. I agree that the buzzy one is far more useful and powerful vocalism. If he were to open to a vowel from that buzz, you would not need a mic to hear him over in Chicago while he does it in Seattle :-)

However, I've got to say that to my ear, and from my perspective on vocal function, the resonance differences in the tone are not because the tone is being brought forward into the mask. Rather, I think the sensation of the tone is the _result_ of the vocal function, not the cause of it. The tone is sensed in the mask because of the efficiency of the phonation and the tuning of the vocal tract resonances are optimal for the strength of high frequency harmonics - the upper overtones.

I am not trying to be argumentative here, but to make a point about cause and effect. IMO, the sensations of mask resonance are not the 'cause' of the great tone, but one of its very useful _effects_. These sensations (and,by the way, not every singer experiences them at all or in the same way) tell us that the phonation is efficient, and the resonance adjustment is tuned to give us high frequency amplification. When these two things are aligned (as they are in Robert's demo) the strong high frequencies sympathetically vibrate all the small bones of the mask in a very powerful and compelling way. For those that experience this, its a form of biofeedback that tells them when they are in their 'bright & ringy' groove.

Just to be a little more technical (hopefully not too), in Robert's 'good' hum I hear a phonation with a very good (rapid) glottal closure transition. This rapid transition adds energetic upper harmonics to the vocal tone created at the larynx. By comparison, the 'bad' hum demonstrated has a much slower glottal closure, and is (as he mentions) correspondingly less buzzy. Also, the good hum has a bit of the high frequency 'twang' as well. Overall, I think its a very effective demonstration.

It don't worry at all when teachers and singers discuss 'singing in the mask', as long as the vowels which result are not sung nasally. As a habit, I convert such statements into 'sing so that you feel vibration in the mask', which, once experienced by the student in the studio, is a perfectly good way to remind them of what they have felt when singing well. However, to the singer who has _never_ felt it, I think it must be used carefully by the teacher, as I think that many novices associate the buzz with nasality. They are not the same thing.

Great demo Robert!

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I use the hum but not a hum that comes from deep within the body. It has to be a hum that one can sustain and feel at mouth level. For pop, all placement is in the mask (the front of the face from mouth to eyebrow and forehead level -- much like that of a mask you'd wear at a costume ball.) Humming helps to get the singer into feeling things at mouth level and higher. Pop, Country, and some Rock placement is more horizontal in sensation, more in the mask, more forward, but the voice cannot be forced into those facial cavities for that internal amplification. To get it right may take working with a combination of breath and vocal exercises because it can be tricky if you are blowing, blasting, or forcing the voice for resonance. It simply won't happen.

Also, the sensation of power and resonance is not as huge as some singers might think.

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Yes..Steven...that will be a long discussion. Cause and effect:-) I must say..if your a teacher..you have to "know" that the cause is starting before the sound...but if you're learning you gotta concentrate on the effect..thinking it's the cause...If a students focuses his attention on the cuase..it will be quite often not sounding so resonant....just because he won't be mastered by his sound.

I don't know if I'm able to give this stuff some sense.

But I felt over the years..that people has to feel the sound first..and the right sound will get their vocal function clearer to their minds.

Sometimes I use different sounds to le t people reach a good resonation and a proper use of the higher resonators. The buzz lets you always masked and gets away nasality. And what you gotta avoid is the nasality of the sound, a great quantity of air causing the vocal folds not to be adducted and the sound to be felt as yawning...

Hope this helps..

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Ale,

Yep, I do know that before the sound is a mental musical image of the sound to be made, and what it will feel like to do. What I have found very interesting in the studio is that the concept has a great deal of influence over the resulting tone, and (beginning with the concept) they play a sort of 'leap frog' during tone quality development. I help the student move the concept, and via practice, the tone quality advances in response. Then, when that tone quality has advanced, the concept can be moved ahead further. Its as if accomplishment of the new tone quality sets a platform on which the new concept can be based.

As an approach, I do actually go right for the physical cause of the quality of the phonation with specific exercises, essentially building the technique as if it was a set of coordinated physical skills. Key among these is the establishment of balance of laryngeal muscle action and breath energy. If they are not right, IMO no manner of emphasis on resonance concept can be well-built, and bridging to the top voice will not work.

However, with a well-balanced phonation (that is, coordinated in timing and balanced in quality), then the pitch-production mechanism of the larynx (which is connected neurologically to the pitch image center of the brain) will be free to make the adjustments that the singer conceptualizes. The tone will be clear, easily-made, and bridging can be learned quite readily.

Its just how I think about it.

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In Bel Canto, it's all about placing the voice as forward as possible - singing as brightly as possible - with an energized vowel shape & with mental clarity focussing on the sound of the vowel being as clear as possible. When the voice is forward, and the vowel is well-shaped (round) and clear, the clarity and strength of the tone is optimal for ease of singing, good legato, comfortable movement through the passiagio, and support of higher notes. In order to help my students understand this, I invite them to think of the voice resonating *from* the lips, or beginning at the lips. A hum, during which the lips 'tickle', means the voice is resonating in the forward position. I agree with the above post that the voice cannot resonate effectively without the right support - which is a free-flowing breath. This is always the first thing we work on.

All that being said, I tell my students in our first meeting, that it is not my job to impose a technique upon them, or try to promote a technique to them. There is no one 'right' method, although I feel strongly that any good method would advocate removing tension & strain, releasing the natural voice, avoid manipulation (except in shaping the sound with the mouth), and, in time, lead to absolute ease in singing thoughout the range 'all in one voice' with a consistent tone.

I tell my students it's my job to listen to where they are right now, in this moment, and organically respond to what I hear, sense & see. IMHO, the student (and the voice), leads.

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Steven..I am with oyu on everything.

Themain thing I teach is the right muscular posture of the neck..everything relaxed..only pharingeal and laryngeal stuff moves.

then..it depends on the stupends...sometimes I get people that visualize perfectly with the anatomy..and sometimes other that anatomy just confuses them

Hey Humming bird...are you a bel canto teacher?

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WEll.....great discussion here! I posted a blog on tones today...did you see it? I agree with all the technical explanation...but lets all agree...we feel it too! I don't like to lock singers into technical descriptions..yes we need to know and understand it.....we also have to achieve it don't we! The hum on the lips does bring the buzz forward but it still comes from gentleness and should not be forced.:cool: dicussion love Hilary

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Bah, hum bug.

Resonance is determined first by your sound cavities size. So, the first move to improve resonance is to increase the size—like expanding your chest.

The next factor is the tonicity of the bouncing muscles & tissues, as taut muscles resonante less than relaxed muscles. This is the area of detensing I’m working on.

The third major factor is placement of the tone.

The fourth major factor is how one shapes the surrounding tissues to shape the tone and to muffle its resonance to create certain sounds.

There is no hum needed here. Hum as a tool predominantly helps one to feel how the sounds feels. Enjoy singing, rather than its exercises. Sing a wide variety of songs and learn to sense the vibrations from the singing itself. “Know Thyself”.

Did you know that if you have sinus problems, humming can help? What it does is slightly massage the sinus and nasal tissues.

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I prefer in this topic calling apples apples and eggs eggs [just inventing my own expression here ;>].

I can understand that in the good 'ol days people wanted to talk about projection, or use all kind of metap. like the mask and what have you, but how about we name the things now?

I think it's really important to just teach the student about the concept of twang which essentially makes the sound appear to be projected [we all know that the voice doesn't project, but we can talk about why we seem to hear sounds as louder and more quiet, or more rich].

As far as for resonance we can teach them about the main resonators and teach them how to use them aswell. Hums can be instrumental with that, but there are many other options, making them experiment with the soft palat, the position of the tongue, the jaw, the larynx ;>

Sensations are very useful to teach the student, but it's gotta be his sensation and not ours. If we tell a student project more, put it in the mask, draw it from the hearth, mental images and so on, he might grasp it, or he might look like What on Earth are you talking about? So in my humble opinion [with just a straw of experience of some of the guys here] I'd advocate for teaching them the general principle behind the voice and then finding concrete ways based on how the individual student works, rather then just give them how WE make our voice bright resonant and what have you.

Just my 2 cents to this discussion, hopefully to some interest.

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BAH HUM BUG and good Elrathion! :rolleyes:

Humming actually makes the occipital bone in the cranium vibrate which carries the vibration into the body and all internal organs via the vagus nerve! The ear and voice mechanism are designed to strengthen and boost the bodies immunity the skull is a cavity for sound. The voice is only an outlet of vibrational frequencies from inside!

Each person is unique in how they express Their sound. The voice is a dna blueprint for our soul! Students learn in their own way and need FACILITATION that is the job of a voice coach! I facilitate the unique voice of the person and the technique is only a small part of the role. Like I said before sound bypasses the mind and singing is inutitive from the soul....technique helps CARE FOR THE VOICE MECHANISM so that damage doesn't occur!:o love Hilary

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BAH HUM BUG and good Elrathion! :rolleyes:

Humming actually makes the occipital bone in the cranium vibrate which carries the vibration into the body and all internal organs via the vagus nerve! The ear and voice mechanism are designed to strengthen and boost the bodies immunity the skull is a cavity for sound. The voice is only an outlet of vibrational frequencies from inside!

Each person is unique in how they express Their sound. The voice is a dna blueprint for our soul! Students learn in their own way and need FACILITATION that is the job of a voice coach! I facilitate the unique voice of the person and the technique is only a small part of the role. Like I said before sound bypasses the mind and singing is inutitive from the soul....technique helps CARE FOR THE VOICE MECHANISM so that damage doesn't occur!:o love Hilary

Hmm some stuff really interest me here. I never payed close attention to the occipital bone when humming :P

Can you specify what you said about the immunity? I don't quite get what you are saying :>

I agree completly with your statement that each person is unique. Therefore I always ask them How does X Y Z feel, mostly they can't answer.

To my opinion teaching the student to experiment is the best thing one can do. It can be so much fun learning how to discover for yourself how to produce different sounds and what you feel is the sound that best fits you as a singer :>

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Resonance is determined first by your sound cavities size. So, the first move to improve resonance is to increase the size—like expanding your chest.

Two questions: Which sound cavities do you have in mind? and, why would 'increasing' the size of a sound cavity 'improve' the resonance? I agree it would change the resonance, but I am just curious as to your reasoning.

The next factor is the tonicity of the bouncing muscles & tissues, as taut muscles resonante less than relaxed muscles. This is the area of detensing I’m working on.

I gotta respond to this one: Unless you are using the term 'resonate' with a wider definition than I do, I think its incorrect to think of muscles 'resonating' at all. Yes, they vibrate, but that is not resonance.

The third major factor is placement of the tone.

The fourth major factor is how one shapes the surrounding tissues to shape the tone and to muffle its resonance to create certain sounds.

I'd like you to explain what you mean by these, if you would.

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Two questions: Which sound cavities do you have in mind? and, why would 'increasing' the size of a sound cavity 'improve' the resonance? I agree it would change the resonance, but I am just curious as to your reasoning.

>>>Chest lung and mouth including pharynx.

Take the extreme-- almost no lung or mouth--(nearly compressed)-- nearly no resonance.

Take the other extreme-- lungs and mouth expanded stretched so tight-- some resonance but perhaps brittle.

Thus, we know resonance is affected by size. The question is, what is the optimal size.

Very few people use their lung capacity fully or stand straight enough to give the lungs optimal tonicity. The vast majority of people would gain by expanding their chest cavity and I would also suggest mouth cavity. By expanding, the tissues within and the suspended ribs are at best tonicity and, in the case of the chest, lower bass can be had because the cavity is larger.

I'll answer other ones later.

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Ok Steve, here is some stuff for you

http://www.box.net/shared/hc22ejuizn Sounds you can make to train twang, and a little explanation

http://www.box.net/shared/r8nlny5sln A note with twang and a note lacking necc. twang

I'm not sure if this is what you wanted, but I hope it helps somewhat.

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Very few people use their lung capacity fully or stand straight enough to give the lungs optimal tonicity. The vast majority of people would gain by expanding their chest cavity and I would also suggest mouth cavity. By expanding, the tissues within and the suspended ribs are at best tonicity and, in the case of the chest, lower bass can be had because the cavity is larger.

A little note on the chest beeing a cavity:

" Let us not forget that the resonators are cavities of air, and while there is air in the lungs it certainly is not free to vibrate as an integral mass. The chest IS NOT a resonator because it's NOT a cavity! The thorax(lungs) is filled with a soft, spongy material similar to that used artificially for insulation. It would tend to absorb, NOT augment." (W. Vennard) "

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