Jump to content

Special Techniques For Head Voice Development!

Rate this topic


Robert Lunte
 Share

Recommended Posts

  • Administrator

I don't remember who asked me about this about two weeks ago, but I promised I would deliver this lecture/presentation. I know some of you hard core TMV World Forum Athletes have seen this, but surely, others have not. So anyways, enjoy...

http://thevocaliststudio.com/how-to-train-the-head-voice-training/

Hope this helps...

:D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 62
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

I don't remember who asked me about this about two weeks ago, but I promised I would deliver this lecture/presentation. I know some of you hard core TMV World Forum Athletes have seen this, but surely, others have not. So anyways, enjoy...

http://thevocaliststudio.com/how-to-train-the-head-voice-training/

Hope this helps...

:D

http://thevocaliststudio.com/how-to-train-the-head-voice-training/

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for sharing, Robert. I like all of those. I would say, too, that the next step after practicing the different onsets is to decide where to use them. One part of one song may do best with a particular onset. Or that song with a certain voice, etc, etc.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What others call mixed voice is really usually a CT dominant phonation at the core, just with a bunch of extra musculature added to beef it up.

You had me at CT dominant phonation. :D

Everything else was but elucidation upon this gem of a statement. And has the effect of "bridging" between the different systems, like KTVA and Frisell.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

i like thinking of my voice as a mix of two musculatures in varying percentages. i dropped registers out of my thinking because i worked up to a place where the development and coordination i worked hard to get made them seem to disappear.

but a lot of my own personal gains came when i devoted a lot to working on support. i'm a huge advocate for support and improving breath capacity.

now i'm at a stage of intense experimentation and customization. there's still plenty to learn, but lately things have been going nicely.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Administrator

rob, those clearly are onsets to help build the mix, but you always say mixed voice is dead. can you clarify a bit?

Bob, I think the term 'mixed voice' is referring to notes approximately between E4 - A4 for men. When I say that "mixed voice is dead", I don't mean the unique physical and acoustic experience we all feel in these areas of M2, but that simply, the term is confusing to students of singing. It makes students think they have to find some 3rd, middle register that doesn't exist. Its just bad talk-track. Here is my video you are referring to. I feel my point is made well here.

"MIXED VOICE" IS DEAD!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ow4VnbIezF4

Bob these specialized onsets are great for any head voice development, below and above A4... its not only for 'mixed voice'. Hope this helps...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Fantastic video! Just by imitating you I found and discovered new feelings and ways of thinking about singing these types of notes. I have the program and use it often but like most of us, I am aurally stimulated and find it very instructive to hear, imitate, then see how I can make it better (less strain, sounding better, etc).

I've always found the idea of the onset to be very useful. If you get a note right from the start, you won't necessarily carry it all the way to be fair. But if you start it wrong, you almost certainly will never get it right.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

thanks rob. i appreciate what you're saying, it's just for me i don't like the term middle register, but i like the term "mixed voice."

frisell says the performing voice is the mixed voice. just another way to look at things, that's all. to me, when you have a really developed "variable" mix you have something really solid.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Administrator

Fantastic video! Just by imitating you I found and discovered new feelings and ways of thinking about singing these types of notes. I have the program and use it often but like most of us, I am aurally stimulated and find it very instructive to hear, imitate, then see how I can make it better (less strain, sounding better, etc).

I've always found the idea of the onset to be very useful. If you get a note right from the start, you won't necessarily carry it all the way to be fair. But if you start it wrong, you almost certainly will never get it right.

You sounds like a TVS student.. Yep...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Administrator

... saw this last night... I put the wrong video in there... that video is "Falsetto is not your head voice!"... a good video and all... but not the one I wanted to share... here go, this is "Mixed Voice is Dead!".

Mixed Voice is DEAD!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HNfpeHE6Wls

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Administrator

I don't think that the term "mix-voice" or "mix" is necessarily more confusing than ex. "head-voice", "chest-voice" or "falsetto". The important thing is, that the people who talk about these terms agree on the definitions.

I agree, people have to share the same and proper meaning of things... using the term "mixed voice" gets students of singing all mixed up. Chest voice / head voice doesn't confuse students of singing, it actually helps to some degree... it is just inadequate and robs students of learning more about what is really going on... Falsetto is a vocal mode, not a register... so as long as you don't use it in the context of it being a vocal register, it isn't confusing.

My students and teachers are not confused a bit about Falsetto, what vocal registers actually are or any of this none sense with the term "mixed voice".

Nope, we are all very clear here at TVS on what is going on... I wish you the best with all that...

Hope this helps...

:cool:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here we go terms terms terms:D that's why you have to keep up with tvs cvt estill sls etc...all if you want to end confusion..it's like learning a few different languages.. Once you get your voice to a place where you physically understand its easier to learn the terms its just learning words..I enjoy it but it is time consuming.. But then again I have alot of spare time:)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Truth is from the beginning of my singing journey up to now. I learned terms so I could help teach different people. But I always looked at it the same for me. I have a chest voice where I speak from, a falsetto voice where I sound like Mickey mouse(varying degrees of breathiness and solid tone) and when I sing high I would always just work at it saying to myself" well I can't sing this in falsetto or I will lose my gig so I would practice varying degrees of my chest voice whether I was yelling or trying to do it soft changing the vowel. But I looked at it as chest voice.

That's just me it made it simple that way. Meaning if I broke into a different gear ala falsetto (yodel) I wasn't in my full singing voice (chest voice) so I practiced everynote slowly and it took a long time not to yell my C4-and up. Notice I said c4 not c5. I use to yell middle c and up to make it through the night and then warm down and pop Advil. That was until I got control. It took many years of 2-4 hours a day. Plus gigs 2-4 hrs night. But I guess that's how long it takes opera singers 7-10 years to really have a hold on THEIR TECHNIQUE. So I feel pretty good about it. I finally don't have any questions.:D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I want to say from here, that I'm not a teacher, I'm a student.

I've watched the video and I'm really scared. Does it really a proper technic? All of onsets sound really aweful for me. I can't imagine myself doing such things to get better voice quality because it doesn't sound even fine. The distortion effect (intentional?) reminds me a cat on fire.

All of these onset are so weak and powerless. I'm a type of strong, ugly rock musician and I'm afraid that these exercises could make me sound like a little girl. I have to ask: do you really think this is the best way to achive high notes?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Administrator

I want to say from here, that I'm not a teacher, I'm a student.

I've watched the video and I'm really scared. Does it really a proper technic? All of onsets sound really aweful for me. I can't imagine myself doing such things to get better voice quality because it doesn't sound even fine. The distortion effect (intentional?) reminds me a cat on fire.

All of these onset are so weak and powerless. I'm a type of strong, ugly rock musician and I'm afraid that these exercises could make me sound like a little girl. I have to ask: do you really think this is the best way to achive high notes?

Is distortion suppose to sound like a cat purring? What is vocal distortion suppose to sound like? Nice and fuzzy? I don't get that.

These onsets are 'weak and powerless"? I hate to sound like Im just being defensive... and those onsets may not be a lot of things, but one thing they are not is 'weak and powerless'. How could you say these onsets will make you sound like a little girl? You mean the 10th of a second that a few of them pass through an open glottis stage during their work flow sequences? Seriously dude, that is all you heard was 2 seconds of falsetto instead of 8 minutes of head voice ripping phonations?

This is about training my friend. Some of the onsets are used in singing, one of them is not, but that is not so important. Its about building strength in your head voice... not really about high notes.

The ironic thing is, if your a 'strong , ugly rock musician' as you say, you are already using some of these onsets and don't even know it... Im sure you are doing 'attack & release', 'wind & release', possibly 'track & release' onsets and don't even realize it.

If you want to sound like a little girl, don't do these onsets...

Perhaps you could share with us some of your vocals, I would like to hear this "strong, ugly rock musician' voice your referring to?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Administrator

I want to say from here, that I'm not a teacher, I'm a student.

I've watched the video and I'm really scared. Does it really a proper technic? All of onsets sound really aweful for me. I can't imagine myself doing such things to get better voice quality because it doesn't sound even fine. The distortion effect (intentional?) reminds me a cat on fire.

All of these onset are so weak and powerless. I'm a type of strong, ugly rock musician and I'm afraid that these exercises could make me sound like a little girl. I have to ask: do you really think this is the best way to achive high notes?

Here my friend even though you only have 1 post and it would appear you registered just so you could post a critique of my efforts to help singers in this forum, I thought I would show you the video you are claiming is going to make you sound like a little girl. I wish you the best bud...

6 Specialized Onsets for Head Voice Development Training:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RE5qKzPMprk

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm sorry if I sound offensive, that wasn't my goal. Maybe it's because I'm not the best user of english. But suspecting me that I'm trolling only because I didn't like the presented idea for training high part of voice is just ridiculous. Leave spying for 007.

Robert:

I can admit one thing: I really don't get the idea of these onset. It's because I cannot find any interesting way to use them in the songs.

Okey, but let's leave it. Let's make disscution more meritorical. I want to know if I use any of these onsets anywhere so I'm putting some record of my old band. I'm sorry that's not in english, but my accent is aweful. Anyway it's all about sound.

http://www8.zippyshare.com/v/28159360/file.html

(The highest notes are about from 2:29)

I'm doing it without more effort, but it sounds too weak for me. I'm afraid that I've got too high voice. But I believe that I can train my high parts to be more powerful.

If you want to hear some short clip without backtracks just let me know.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Administrator

well, if thats the way you want to sing, then you may be right, there is no use for these onsets. These onsets are about training your voice bud. They are used by people that seek to really know what they are doing with their singing and want to be able to command and control different ways of singing. For someone that wants to just grind their voice down with 'screamo' and growls it wouldn't be very interesting.

I will say this, if you keep singing like that, you are going to damage your voice and the ability to sing will be the last of your worries. Another point is, I would suggest you take interest in learning how to use your voice in different ways so you can have options as an artist, instead of using the same vocal effect over and over again.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Robert, with all the respect, something in this disscution obviously isn't going so well...

It's because you try to tell me that my technic is so wrong, that I won't be able to use my voice in future. I'm practising extreme style of singing from the begining of my journey, it's about 5 years. At the beginings I had got problems with throat etc. But after some failures I discovered what works well for my voice and doesn't hurt me.

A month ago I went to the phoniatric to exam my throat. She didn't find any problem with my vocal chords. Uh, ironic. It has to be her mistake :/

...

I'm really dissapointed that the only thing you can tell it's that I'm worse because... Oh, because of what anyway? Any proves? I am really starting to think that the only reason for calling my technic as bad is that you cannot do something like that without pain. :/

Oh, there's more, you think that's the only way I can sing. Huh, I have to say you a tough guy. Suggesting it to someone that you've heard only in 4-minute-long demo of yet-another-metal-band. Especially you wanted to hear something powerful like that. Could you decide what do you really want to hear?

I'm suggesting you to make yourself familiar with terms "screamo" and "growl", because I don't do any of these thing on this record.

PS. I'm twice as much disappointed. I see you were a student of Maestro Kyle. He was the teacher for Layne Staley... Hmmm... I wonder what you would say about his "grinding voice" technic... Hmmm... He died, it obviously had to be wrong and deadly :/

Link to comment
Share on other sites

ryjcio;

I think you are viewing everything from your perspective of valuing screamo in the baritone range, as if that is the only way to sing and anything else is "weak."

This will probably come as a shock to you but not everyone is into screamo. Many would rather sing cleaner with a tinge of "distortion."

Jussi Boerling would sing really high and clean. Go ahead, call him weak. Or his son, Rolfo, slightly more baritonic but just as clean. Go ahead and call him weak.

I would hestitate to call you a troll. But I would suspect that you are young and perhaps, lacking some wider perspective. You could learn quite a bit if you stick around and try some things out before you pass a summary judgement. Maybe you won't. But we all learn something new every day.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share


×
×
  • Create New...