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Question regarding range and quality

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RiaJuuuuu10
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I'm honestly not sure if this is the right forum but... here it goes:

I've been singing on and off for about 3 years now. When I first started, I could only sing up to high E, and it sounded AWFUL. After realizing I sounded like garbage and I didn't know how to sing, I took vocal lessons for about 3 months, and I learned how to use my diaphragm and sing properly, though stupid me still would force notes I couldn't reach out for about a year and a half. I finally stopped doing that for the most part, but even with forcing notes, I managed to increase my range to about high F# and high B head voice/falsetto. But now I've written a lot of my own stuff, but enough of it requires me to hit G or even A at points(and sound like a solid note, not overly high/falsetto-ish). The thing is I CAN hit G fairly easily if it's connected to another note depending on the song. But I was trying to sing the chorus of Don't Look Back In Anger, and I can hit and hold the note and it sounds somewhat alright(not clean enough, but satisfactory note-wise) but it was forced, and the familiar sore throat feeling hit me again soon after(it was quite a few attempts though, and some other high range songs too).

The thing is, I can hit and hold high F#, but even some songs with F are still hard for me to hit at times, depending whether it's a good or bad day(Pieces by Sum 41 for example). So I guess my main question is, if I can hit these notes and not sound entirely awful now just from singing like a monkey in the past, is there a good chance that I can get my range without falsetto up to high A or at least G with good quality if I start taking legitimate vocal lessons again and actually do range exercises? And in case it matters, I'm 19 years old(but I doubt that does)

ONE MORE THING, and this will sound stupid for someone who's trying to become a better singer, I'm somewhat of a heavy smoker. I'm trying to quit ASAP, and I think I have enough motivation to do so, but regarding it: If I were to quit, should I expect to see an improvement in range? I know smoking affects your lung capacity which is crucial to singing, and yes you need a lot of breath for high notes, but what I'm really asking is if my initial dilemma would most likely fix itself if I did this? Like other than the breath, should I be able to hit higher notes after my lungs recover?

So yeah, those are the two questions I have, and I really appreciate anyone's answers/advice :D

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Assuming you are talking about the notes in the 4th octave and possibly beginning if the 5th, yes with a legitimate coach

you should be able to sing those notes. You will have to train a lot though but its doable.

For quitting your smoking I don't think you will get more range, that is more of a technique thing. I do however your stamina and endurance will see some hefty increases if you decide to change to a healthier lifestyle.

Good luck!

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Actually I'm naturally a bass singer, and I'm pretty sure I'm at in between 2 and 3 octaves? Pretty much the G I'm talking about is the first G on the top E string(high) on the guitar. If that's the case, is there an even better chance that I should be able to get to the G/A on the string, given some time(and doing range exercises/taking vocal lessons)?

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Yes you can extend your full voice range as high as you can sing falsetto. And if you want more you can go much higher than that. It takes a lot of work and it doesn't happen overnight. We have a true bass on the forum that sing up to D6 (nearly 2 octaves higher than your E4). So the G4 and A4 you are talking about is just the tip of the iceberg for you. However that part of your range is the passagio - the most difficult to navigate. That's where lessons help A LOT.

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G above the skinny E string, which is called the first string, is G4.

Quitting smoking will not necessarily increase range but it will make breathing for singing way easier, less coughing, and endurance for days. You will hold a note long enough to grow a gray hair.

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