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How did you learn to sing?

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izzle1989
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Hello Everybody,

I have been gone for quite some time now and I can honestly say I miss you guys. As most of you know I'm in college for Vocal performance and I have been very busy. I have been so busy that I have not had time to be as active of a member on the forum like I was initially, but I'm back now! LOL

I have asked this question because I love the psychology of singing just as much as the physiology. I honestly learned to sing by myself and have been self taught up until my first year of college last year. I am doing a deep study on how natural it is for good singing to occur, so I would like everyone's input on how they learned to sing.

These are a few questions for you guys.

What do you focus on when creating sound?

Do you focus on making the sound as beautiful as possible?

Do you focus on making the sound as relaxed as possible?

If you have vibrato has it come naturally for you? Did you have to so something to find it?

Video or audio examples are more than welcome. :) Thanks in advance.

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First off, welcome back man!

Here comes my version, for better or worse.

What do you focus on when creating sound?

I usually focus on the feeling of the song, at least I try to. Sometimes when I'm working on something technical, I'm thinking about the feelings or sensations from the exercises I've done to be able to sing the song, sometimes it helps sometimes it makes me sound too "robotic".

Do you focus on making the sound as beautiful as possible?

Very seldom do I think beauty :P I'm not sure if that is a good or a bad thing for me, but the feeling of beauty is not a feeling I often get when listening to music. Unless it's a female singer, and then I very rarely try to cover that song anyway.

Do you focus on making the sound as relaxed as possible?

Yes indeed. The more I practice and the more advice I get, the more I understand how good technique, "effortless singing", comfort and relaxation goes hand in hand. This does not mean it's easy though, or that there is no effort. It simply means the singing feels more natural, and the throat feels "untouched" afterwards.

If you have vibrato has it come naturally for you? Did you have to so something to find it?

I never had a vibrato. I tried to just oscillate between tones alot and it got me some kind of vibrato, but it was very bad. However, now that I am starting to get my technique together, support is making more sense, I've learned some resonance and from that a much less strained and breathy tone, the vibrato is coming MUCH more natural. So it's hard to say, since I used to practice it. But the practice didn't give much result, however getting the general basics together it came much more natural, more fluid and with more control.

Cheers mate!

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Thanks brother Mivke! I really appreciate your input and I can understand how the thought of "vocal exercises" can make things feel robotic. I can relate to you on the topic of "effortless singing"...Sometimes things just work ya know. When everything is clicking singing just feels like you are not even creating the sound it just emerges from you.

I ask the question about vibrato because I had a lot of trouble finding a consistent vibrato, and still to this day have a little trouble with that issue. I started out creating my own vibrato too, but that just caused more technical problems.(sending an inconsistent air flow to the vocal folds) Some days things just work perfectly and I try to set up those same conditions whenever I vocalize.

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Indeed, vibrato works best for me now when I don't try to think about it. A friend who knows I've started practicing singing and wishes to learn asked me to demonstrate vibrato and I was very unsuccessful. However, when singing songs it usually just comes in at certain times, far from perfect but at least it's there and quite consistent :)

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Welcome back Izzle :)

My whole family was playing music long before I was born. Mostly Bluegrass and Southern Gospel for the older generations. No one had proffessional training. They just liked music and sang for the fun of it.

As for what do I think of when creating sounds. That is it. I think of the sound.

I am always mimicing sounds.

When I am working on a song I think about the message I want to relate. That seems to guide me in the production of the actual notes and how I am going to sing them. If I am having trouble with a note or phrase I will go over and over that until I get it.

Vibrato comes in by itself when it comes in. A song like HOW GREAT THOU ART it will come in naturally.

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Welcome back :)

If i'm training scales etc I focus on sound I'm creating but how it feels, not how it sounds. I often record it, then I can hear how it sounds!

Singing a song however, I focus on the emotion and intent that I'm trying to convey through that song. I'm personally a big advocator of concentrate on the technique with exercises and a bit of applying it to songs, especially If your getting stuck but forget about it for actually performing, well not forget about it but the idea is that it becomes muscle memory.

Agree with the relaxed thing. Sometimes I can feel myself getting tense because I can't do what i'm trying too so I have to force myself to take 5. Maybe do bit of meditation, have a cuppa or do a little gentle facial massage and some stretching, depends what mood i'm in!

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Hello Everybody,

I have been gone for quite some time now and I can honestly say I miss you guys. As most of you know I'm in college for Vocal performance and I have been very busy. I have been so busy that I have not had time to be as active of a member on the forum like I was initially, but I'm back now! LOL

I have asked this question because I love the psychology of singing just as much as the physiology. I honestly learned to sing by myself and have been self taught up until my first year of college last year. I am doing a deep study on how natural it is for good singing to occur, so I would like everyone's input on how they learned to sing.

These are a few questions for you guys.

What do you focus on when creating sound?

Do you focus on making the sound as beautiful as possible?

Do you focus on making the sound as relaxed as possible?

If you have vibrato has it come naturally for you? Did you have to so something to find it?

Video or audio examples are more than welcome. :) Thanks in advance.

Hey izzle here ya go

My simple answer is I focus on a low breathe always expanding, a relaxed but solid clear tone as nice and even as I can make it..I make sure not to strain or sound strained. When I do feel or hear strain I turn back around and start again until its warm and ready to move to the next note. There it is thats it in a nutshell for the last 5-7 yrs.

daniel

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I'm self taught up until about 15 months ago. By self taught I mean that I was singing for years (to myself) and once and awhile in front of someone. But I was always listening to how songs were sung rather than just the melody, and then I tried to mimic those sounds and find ways to create them with my own voice. I would also listen closely whenever I heard someone explaining how they learned or how a coach may have helped someone (you know...like when they show behind the scenes on TV and stuff). And then try to work on those things myself.

What do you focus on when creating sound?

Where it is coming from and then where I might want to place it to get more freedom or better resonance, pitch etc. Support and breath control in general. Timing. Resonance. Control.

Do you focus on making the sound as beautiful as possible?

Most times yes. I could say always but when I sing hard blues I might be going for some grit that I'm not sure fits the "beautiful" adjective. But pretty much yes. Even in those songs somewhere I want to shine :)

Do you focus on making the sound as relaxed as possible?

Yes....I try.

If you have vibrato has it come naturally for you? Did you have to so something to find it?

Always had it.

Actually I learned to control it and back it off rather than create it, as it was always there. It came naturally but I found I was using it always, even when I shouldn't. I discovered that after coming to this forum and starting to record myself.

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it's about time you got back here....lol!!!

1. the lower core, clarity of vowel, a rich full sound (most of the time) and the "ring."

2. i like to sound sexy and blusey, honestly, i go for that.

3.not concerned with ease because i like a powerful sound but the more skilled i become the ease seems to come.

4. thank god it comes naturally in lower notes and or softer notes...tougher to get up high and powerful.

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What do you focus on when creating sound?

Volume and presence, something that makes my head ring.

Do you focus on making the sound as beautiful as possible?

Yes, to the point of not really caring about "distortion," even if the genre of the song "requires" it. I don't give a flip. I aim to make the note beautiful as possible, outside of actual opera singing.

Do you focus on making the sound as relaxed as possible?

I'm not sure if the sound is relaxed but my aim is to be relaxed. Which doesn't mean drifting off to sleep. It just means that I am singing efficiently and without any undue strain or tension. If I feel strain, I stop what I am doing and adjust support or vowel or both. I realize others may disagree and such others may think some strain is necessary. Viva la Difference.

If you have vibrato has it come naturally for you? Did you have to so something to find it?

Yes, and yes. And recently, as I have really watched my vowels and seek that ringing in my head, I have vibrato with no conscious "effort." I think it comes from the ease of production of the note once the right things are in place. So, my lazy relaxed singing is allowing the vibrato to come forth.

MDEW answered your first question, spot on. How did we learn to sing? What leads us to this? You mentioned learning by yourself until you have now been in college as a voice major (with, I think, PE or Kinesthesiology minor, is that right?)

Like MDEW, everyone in my family sang, though we were not public performers, except for my step-grandfather, who sang in church choir and in church productions of such musicals as "Fiddler on the Roof." I remember him sauntering around the house rehearsing, in bass, the piece, "Sunrise, Sunset."

My grandmother sang hillybilly country songs, scooping notes like there was no tomorrow. My mother would sing along with the radio to such as songs "Rose Garden."

I sang a little bit, too. I remember as a kid, hearing on the radio, "Smoke on the Water" and being inspired to capture that power.

But it was not until I was 10 years old and we were preparing to move from California to Texas, that I first picked up a guitar. My grandparents had a classical guitar (my step-grandfather lived and breathed classical music.) He only messed with it a few times and it sat in the closet. There were only 3 strings left. I was lazing around in their living room. And started picking the arpeggiated beginning to "Who'll Stop the Rain?" by Creedence Clearwater Revival.

A few weeks later, we moved to Texas. My mother gave me a student folk guitar that my father had bought for her. In his younger college days, he was a music major at the University of South Dakota, before transferring to UCLA. She could not afford lessons. We were always a family of "figure it out for yourself." My brother, slstone, is an even better example of that than myself, for he knows more instruments, more business, more recording than I do. Anyway, all she could afford for me was a set of strings and Mel Bay's Book of Chords. Then, my step-grandfather taught me how to read sheet music. And basic music theory, Tonic, Fourth, Fifth, etc. And so, I could now read song books and learn how to play songs and I have always sang along while playing the guitar.

It's one of those things. I see people, now, trying to figure out how to play and sing at the same time. Where as, I learned it at once, like walking and chewing gum. In fact, it is harder for me to sing against a pre-recorded track than it is to play guitar and sing at the same time. So, most of my song submissions with me on guitar are recorded on one track, me playing guitar and singing at the same time. It's what I have been doing since 1974 - 75. We had moved to Texas in October of 1974. So, yes, I have been in Texas and playing guitar and singing for 38 years.

But my voice was undeveloped, especially in the upper end of my range. Thigns like the high part of "Stairway to Heaven," which I figure out how to play in 1979, I would sing in falsetto. I got married to my first wife in 1987. By 1988, "Sweet Child of Mine" exploded on the radio like a hydrogen bomb. And I was so inspired by that power and range. I knew I just had to sing with that kind of power and intensity.

So, still so broke that if Caddilacs were only a dollar, all that I could say was "What a deal!", I went to the public library and found a book entitled "How To Sing" by Graham Hewitt. From there, I found the power in my upper range. And I had little control over the volume. My first wife would get headaches. Not from being off pitch but from being so stinkin' loud. She said, and I quote, "You could sing at the Cotton Bowl. Without a p.a."

My view of myself changed. I was no longer a guitar player who could sing. I was a singer that played guitar.

I usually had some weak spots in the passaggio but I just kept hammering on.

One day, a few years ago, I was on youtube, messing around and searched singing. And came across tutorials from Kevin Richards of RockthestageNYC. And he mentioned this forum.

And found a challenge I could finally get into. And found myself at odds and, at other times, mystified. Add to that, being raised by my mother to never back down from anything (please, you have to believe me, I am a mellower version of her,) I know I came across as arrogant, combative, touchy, a powder keg, a loose cannon, choose your metaphor. And I still have to wacky sense of humor that ranges from droll to rather pointed (you can thank my step-grandfather and even my brother for that. One of my favorite lines, that my brother came up with is, "I laugh at pain --- your pain." Absolutely brilliant.)

In all the time I have been singing and learning songs and all that stuff, I have never desired to sound exactly like another singer. I have always wanted to be known for the sound of Ron, just as those other singers are known for their sound. I can be inspired by them, I might even try a sound that is similar. But I have not set my self on the path to be the next Ronnie James Dio, the next Robert Plant, or even the next Glenn Hughes. If I have any similar sounds to these or other singers, it is purely by accident or even artifacts of recording. Bruce Dickinson said it best when he had taught himself how to sing from books. "So, that is how they do that thing. What can my voice do?"

And so, from then to now, as with guitar, so with singing, as i was raised by my family, "figure it out for yourself." And so I did, and I do. And I still don't do scales. Even when I was learning scales on guitars, I never, ever, just sat there and ran through scales for hours. Once I learned the basic pattern (technique) the very next thing I am doing is jamming along to the radio, putting it to use.

Same with singing. I will learn something and immediately put it into singing. Because that is where the habits are. Often, I simply practice with singing a song. And I may use one technique for the whole song, because it amuses me.

But, as of late, I am building the habit of being conscious in my tuning from note to note. That is, not to just "lock in" to one position of support or intonation. But to keep it mobile and agile. I.E., you have to be "awake" while singing.

Often, for warm-up, I may sing the first verse, maybe even the first chorus of a song at soft volume, even some high parts in falsetto, checking placement. By the next verse, it's on, baby.

And a few times, I just launch into it, no warm-up.

I'm a bad man. I break a number of rules.

But I follow some. Always sing in your own voice. Quit trying to sound like the other singer. Do what it is that your voice can do, don't do what it cannot do (and yes, it may take a while to find out what it cannot do.) That's not being lazy, that's being efficient.

It's not how much you sing, it's not how many scales you practice, or for how long, or for how many years. It is how you sing that is important.

I have been singing a long time. And I still feel my voice is new, everyday.

I don't know everything, and even a month or so ago, Steven Fraser pointed out where I was wrong in some thinking.

But Owen described me to a T. I prefer the mystery of discovery to the paralysis by analysis.

I don't know everything and I never will. I don't even know as much about singing as I think I do. I can't always describe accurately what I am doing. I just do it.

I have limits and I am okay with that. I am going to have my 3 octave range and that is it. And that's okay with me because the songs that I want to sing are within the limits of that range. And my time is better spent having that range seamless.

I am not going to be an opera singer, even though I like some opera singers. I am a rock singer who gets to sing for others, now and then, in any particular place where I can get away with it. None of the current bands about are looking for a middle-aged guy singing stuff from the 70's. And my audience may be the half-drunk crowd at the Library Bar and Grill, or the full drunk crowd at Linda's New Year's Eve Party. That's okay, too.

I can still sing "Stairway to Heaven" in the original key. Booyah .....

But being here is inspiring to me. This is a tough crowd, you singers. And when I do a song that gets good comments, I have really achieved something. I think we all feel the same way, or we would not keep bringing songs in.

And, I like to help, even in my own redneck way. I really like to sing.

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Welcome back Izzle :)

My whole family was playing music long before I was born. Mostly Bluegrass and Southern Gospel for the older generations. No one had proffessional training. They just liked music and sang for the fun of it.

As for what do I think of when creating sounds. That is it. I think of the sound.

I am always mimicing sounds.

When I am working on a song I think about the message I want to relate. That seems to guide me in the production of the actual notes and how I am going to sing them. If I am having trouble with a note or phrase I will go over and over that until I get it.

Vibrato comes in by itself when it comes in. A song like HOW GREAT THOU ART it will come in naturally.

Thanks for the welcome I greatly appreciate it. I feel that growing up around music is a very important teaching tool regardless of if one is trained or not. That is truly a blessing. Sometimes I have more success with the method you mention above of simply making sound.

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I read the thread link you mentioned, Owen. I get your distinction between learning and training. Learning is where you learn the actual move or process, training is a physical thing to, where we aim to make what is learned a thing that we can repeat, as necessary, without undue strain, as any athletic endeavor requires endurance.

So, your previous learning phase was like most any other, including mine, where you could sing some on your own and picked up bits and pieces from here and there.

Do you view yourself in training now because 4 Pillars does have a training pattern or regimen (of course being tailored to whatever your needs may be, I don't view it is as rigid or moribund)?

In one sense, none of ever stop training. For, as you alluded to, in what becomes habit, you can also train in the wrong things. And singing with the wrong things is also training.

So, I guess we're all training. Some of us may train more steadily than others, with guidance, a program, whatever. But having that guide to go by, plus the curriculum of what to train and when, I think that may certainly produce faster results. Plus the attention of the student. A teacher can be the most fabulous person on the 7 continents, but if the student is not listening or applying for themselves, or actively concentrating on what they are doing, less than optimum benefit may be achieved.

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Lets see...

With 15/16 years I began singing for fun at home as my brother learned how to play the guitar. Being a computer geek, I started to use our top notch equipment to record ourselves and listen. A few recordings were done at that time, the best from that time is this one:

https://www.box.com/s/0d3k0wrrljhd1brd6pmg

The I joined a band, but my "technique" at the time was limited to force and scream things. I did a so/so job live, recording stuff... well not really. Live things are always more easy going, the loudness makes even poorly executed stuff sound nice.

At that time, I didnt had a clue that technique even existed. To me singing was a inborn skill, like you can do it, or not. I never spent any time thinking about that actually. I was pretty much convinced I was a baritone or even a bass lol, because my voice is really heavy, and at that time, with all the tensions and poor projection, it sounded all the same. This song was pretty much the max I could do without starting to scream.

Then, as I reharsed and grew up in the band, one day during the reharsals, my voice was working nice (I had no clue why!!) and suddenly, during a difficult song, there, covered the sound, went higher then I ever did, and so easily, pressure on the soft palate, the whole pack... At that day I was like "ooo so thats the secret, just send your voice back".

Next day, I could not reproduce it even if my life depended on it... Forced my voice up there, and nothing.

So I figure something was different, and looked for a coach to help me...

I looked for the best coach I could found around here. Looked for references, and I went for the most famous and "well known" pop coach I could find. So I began working...

In there I was presented to the words support, head voice, chest voice, resonance, the whole package. Unfortunately, all done wrong. If you compare that sample of when I began with this:

https://www.box.com/s/9kbem7kaysjctlylwtjc

Any listenner will have a hard time to even recognize as the same person, plus, its sooo squeezed, so pressed, I remember that at the end of the shows I would sleep like 12 or 14 hours straight because of how tired I became, the "support" I used was a bizarre press out thing, no control whatsoever.

It was 2 years trainning like this, then I met my wife... :). She goes with me to one trainning session, and then she states the obvious... "Fê, why do you pay this guy to teach you? He sounds like crap, he cant sing!". You see, all the technical junk he believed he knew (and he still believes, has lots of youtube videos "teaching" people), was not perceived as singing by someone outside all this "technical" thing, it was just meant to expand range, to be able to hit notes, circus tricks.

And so I began looking in other places. Went to an opera, was blew away by all that power (my goal and references always was singers who can deliver power, such as Freddie Mercury, Dio, and so on). Found Chris on another forum (and in that forum I had feedback on a similar recording of Perfect Strangers that also helped openning my eyes), and began trainning with him.

Right now, I can happily say that not only its much easier than even on that first song, as I sound like myself again (this is of ultmost importance for all of you guys, even if you dont think so right now), Ill record another version of Perfect Strangers later and follow up here. The whole idea of the "classical" thing, is within these questions of yours Izz:

Singing should and must be comfortable, easy and beautifull. And its from comfort and the hability to control your voice and produce soft and beautifull sounds, that you become able to deliver power. A lot of power, and when I mean a lot, I mean that when trainning for endurance with fortissimo, you can be heard a few blocks away.

Relaxed isnt really the idea, the neck should be relaxed, and nothing should be locked in place, but if you compare what I do now with before, even with all that squeezing I did, right now I make my voice work 10 times more than in both samples. Its a lot, but because its compatible with the intention, its the right ammount, its easy and comfortable. Doing the passagio as I do now, without trying to let go of the register, without changing into falsetto, or M2 or whatever, would probably kill me on stage at these past times lol.

And I even figured what hapenned at that day that I covered without knowing what I did and could not replicate. For some reason, at that day my voice was well placed, and it could happen, maybe I was in an excelent mood, I was happy. While my voice was randomly placed depending on my mood, I would never be able to reproduce it.

About vibrato. The technical vibrato, the correct one used by classical singers, does not happen as a direct intention, but from application of technique, correct placement and comfort will make it happen. It happens because of the placement. On pop, because of the lower placement of the voice, its not so pronounced, but its there if your voice is free, it sounds just natural. Forcing a vibrato is one of the most annoying things you can ever do to the listenner. Its the trade mark of the pseudo technical singer ( the kind of singer that makes listenners say that they dont like trainned voices).

I never use it as an effect, but when I add more weight, and move the placement up, it becomes more defined.

Please guys, dont ever force vibrato, dont even look for it, I swear that nobody cares for it done in such way. And its a great way to keep track of technique. Vibrato hapenning without you thinking about it is a great sign that your voice is working efficiently. Actually the idea it translates to the listenner is just that, comfort, it makes it sound easy.

Hope it adds something to your ideas Izz. Keep up your work, its necessary, and if I knew this info 10 years ago, it would have saved me a few years of chasing magic instead of working on the basics. Thats all there is to technique, basics.

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I really like this thread, Iz.

And I am noticing something of a pattern. Most of us started long ago, personally, as well as chronologically, with the desire to sing. First, as mostly untrained amateurs, just singing whatever we can, however we can. And later, seeking instruction or tips through whatever sources available, ranging from books to actual lessons with living, breathing coaches. That brings us to whatever levels of capability, finesse, etc. But it started with the desire to sing so strong that nothing could stop us. It was not as if we were ordering from a menu. "I'll have the Kung Pao Chicken, some egg rolls, and a side of awesome singing. Does that come with a lime, on the side?"

And a number of us had also learned some musical instrument, which many a singing program would advocatd. Nearly every book I read on classical advocated learning the basics of a instrument, such as piano. It developed a better sense of melody and harmony. And timing and phrasing. Does knowing an instrument making learning of singing a little more intuitive for some than others? I don't know. But I think it is good. My brother, Scott, is just flowing with talent and ability and drive. He played, for a while, the clarinet. Piano and keyboards, drums, guitar, bass, and sings. Amongst a host of other things music-related. At first, he would ask me to show him something on guitar, a few times. Now, he could probably give me lessons. I play guitar well enough to accompany myself and, since the 80's that is all I have wanted from guitar playing.

Sure, I learned some lead guitar stuff, too. I used to play the guitar solo from "Stairway to Heaven" note for note from the album. Now, if I play that, I follow the Jimmie Page method, which is anything in the blues scale in either A or E.

We will all keep learning in our singing.

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When I was growing up, even until now I would ask those who sing "how do you do it?". Most of the time I would get an answer like: " I don't know I just do it" or "sing to the back of the room". Really great answers don't you think.

The guitar players I knew would practice daily. Always learning new Techniques and practicing until their fingers bled. But all the singers would just "wing it". Even in band practice, we would go over the lead guitar parts several times so the guitar player could get it right.

We are the instrument when we are singing. We need to train and learn technique and practice just as much as those guitar players. Even a cheap second hand guitar can sound great if the man playing knows how to tune the strings, set the intonation on the guitar so your higher frets stay "in tune" when playing up the neck(higher notes), and then play the proper notes in succession.

What we are doing by Training is Tuning our voices, and setting the intonation. Making our instrument play well so that when it becomes time to deliver the the song we do not have to worry about anything but the song, the Message and the feeling we want to convey.

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it's about time you got back here....lol!!!

1. the lower core, clarity of vowel, a rich full sound (most of the time) and the "ring."

2. i like to sound sexy and blusey, honestly, i go for that.

3.not concerned with ease because i like a powerful sound but the more skilled i become the ease seems to come.

4. thank god it comes naturally in lower notes and or softer notes...tougher to get up high and powerful.

LOL Thanks Bob.

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I am so pleased with all of your responses. I can agree with all of you about how this singing thing just came naturally at first then it had to be trained.

Felipe I had the same reaction when I attended my first opera. I was like wooooooowwwww how can I learn to do this??? I would destroy my genre of music if I could do this. Now I am training classically (Thank God) LOL

Ron I really loved your detailed post about your singing journey. These types of posts help all of us to rest assured that we are doing the right things. I believe this thread will be very beneficial for the beginners and the advanced vocalist.

I did not respond to everyone's post individually because I felt that they all had COMMON SIMILARITIES which is such a great thing for us and the viewers. I greatly appreciate the responses from all of you. Thanks :)

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Welcome back :)

If i'm training scales etc I focus on sound I'm creating but how it feels, not how it sounds. I often record it, then I can hear how it sounds!

Singing a song however, I focus on the emotion and intent that I'm trying to convey through that song. I'm personally a big advocator of concentrate on the technique with exercises and a bit of applying it to songs, especially If your getting stuck but forget about it for actually performing, well not forget about it but the idea is that it becomes muscle memory.

Agree with the relaxed thing. Sometimes I can feel myself getting tense because I can't do what i'm trying too so I have to force myself to take 5. Maybe do bit of meditation, have a cuppa or do a little gentle facial massage and some stretching, depends what mood i'm in!

Ahhhh I always have my best days when I start out with meditation, stretches, and breathing exercises. Mainly just to slow down the breath cycle and relax.

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felipe and ron could add a front and back cover to their posts and publish it. where do you guys get the time time to write all of this? my god!

i've got to hand it to you folks.....

Bob I was thinking the same thing. We have some amazing people within this forum. What a blessing!

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Singing should and must be comfortable, easy and beautifull. And its from comfort and the hability to control your voice and produce soft and beautifull sounds, t hat you become able to deliver power.

When I answered the question about making the sound relaxed this is more of what I was referring to. I tend to sing loud and many times I am putting forth a lot of effort and at times this leads to tension. But I think that is natural tension needed to create the intensity needed in that particular note. And if I were singing songs like Bob, then maybe there would be more of it needed. But to me that's a controlled tension. Not an unnecessary one. If it's unnecessary tension then that is not good. That is what I mean by relaxed sound.

Hey Felipe. No offense man but...

That first clip "Tears in Heaven" was good but maybe just a bit untrained. It could have used a little more "oomph." Understandably since it was a new thing. But it was good :) But no offense man that second clip was bad. :D Knowing your voice now...man, that wasn't good. That guy screwed you man!!! :D

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felipe and ron could add a front and back cover to their posts and publish it. where do you guys get the time time to write all of this? my god!

i've got to hand it to you folks.....

I cannot answer for Felipe. But Bob, I type faster than you can.

:lol:

You may think I spent a lot of time. The post was dated 10-26-12, which was Friday evening. At home, after work.

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