Jump to content

Thoughts on practicing proper breathing

Rate this topic


Seth
 Share

Recommended Posts

So I've been thinking about ways to get in more practice during the day, even at times I am not able to sing. My goal is super healthy, strain free singing, and I've had most success achieving (or getting close to this) when I focus on those yawny breaths. So my thought is to apply this kind of breath to every day speaking. Obviously, it will be a difficult transition at first, and people might think I'm a weirdo for pausing to take those breaths in speech. Ha, they might even just think I'm just a very a pensive person. Regardless, this is something I am going to experiment with over the next little while. I'll update this thread with my thoughts as I have them.

Also open to any people's opinions on this approach, or if this is something others have tried/heard before. And of course, everyone is welcome to try this experiment along with me.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think it's poinless, you probably naturaly do the good inhalation. I don't know what is the yawning breath, but if it's an inhaling through the mouth... I have to say it the worst idea ever. A nose was made by God to taking the breath. It cleans the stream of air from the bacteries and dirt.

But if it's not... I say everything will be fine if you feel comfortable with it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My teacher recommended me to breath through my nose and mouth at the same time while singing. But he said that is not good to breath like this always.

Lowering the soft palate isn't as bad as it known. The too raised palate depresses the root of the toungue too much and makes you sound too dopy even for opera. Yawning sensation isn't a good thing as well and told me to avoid this. But I see you are recommending it here...

Okey, now I'm confused.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Seth, what you are talking about reminded me of "resonant speaking." But that can be a lot of effort, as well.

What I do is stay away from fry. Roger Love said to say the word "hello" and hold it on the 'o'. That is where your natural speaking voice normally is.

My job has me on the phone all day. So, I don't force the voice and I don't hold it in one spot, even to speak "resonantly." Just let it flow. And I love the clients and builders who communicate mostly through email. Thereby allowing me a brief respite. Not that phonation is tiring but anything can wear out. For example, none of us walks 25 miles a day and if we did, we would be tired and have to rest. Seriously, the most "conditioned" athletes need rest, too.

But what you can do is something I read from Ron Keel. Belly breathe at all times. In fact, he started serious voice training by not singing but just remembering to belly breathe. After a while it's as easy as, well, as easy as breathing, literally and figuratively. That is, make sure all phonation is fired from below.

And then, from there, let the voice float where it is going to float.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Seth,

Innovative thinking on this. I had considered this option as well, but eventually decided against it. First, the nose does warm and help clean the air, so regular yawning intake isn’t healthy. Second, it does look strange. Third, one has to add pauses in conversation.

There are lots of things that can be done regularly, and these all basically involve posture. Continous deep diaphragm breathing. This is relatively easy, if you can keep the ribs uplifted. If you can, deep diaphragm breathing will help attain easier power.

Incidentally, yawning breathing is useful for adding larynx drop while singing, but you may want to ask why singers can’t do this without the yawning breath, naturally. In another word, why is yawning breath even needed, particularly if deep diaphragm breathing is already developed?

Larynx drop is best achieved by first developing a very good posture. Afterwards it’s a lot easier and can be volitionally controlled. Yawning breath can still help a bit more. You can read about larynx drop in Alan Green’s book, and eventually, I’ll write about larynx drop and posture in www.VocalPosture.com.

Improve your posture regularly and your singing will naturally dramatically improve, and you’ll look great at the same time!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hardly will achieve anything other than problems.

For better speaking habits, see an ENT and then a speech therapist.

Usually, just some exercises with placement are enough. If you speak in public to audiences, it may be a good idea to support the spoken voice too. Speech therapists usually know how to address these cases. Insisting on a yawn like posture will make your voice breathy, not resonant. The posture for resonance in chest voice is not yawn like.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So the universal response seems to be that this is a dumb idea. I suspected as much. Whatever, I stopped the experiment anyway, it required too much concentration. But here's another thought: wouldn't speaking in a mix be healthier than always speaking in chest? Not to mention great practice... though speaking in the C4 range is kinda ridiculous, if the head voice is brought down in the way that the Frisell Method prescribes, then it would be possible, if not automatic to mix the low speaking tones.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

seth, if you can get into the habit of supporting your speaking (nothing too intense) and speaking where you would phonate "ng" it helps quite a bit.

example: sing a sustained "hung" then turn it to speaking but keep the placement. it may have a twangy sound, but at least you're out of the throat.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Seth its possible. I do this.

It will work to protect your voice if you use in small dosis, too much will make your spoken voice airy or will engage too much support.

Will not do much regarding trainning.

What is a very good trainning is picking a book/text of choice and reading it centered around F4, using proper placement AND support at a normal spoken volume. Use some peaks and valeys of emotion, and articulate it well.

Do it as long as it is comfortable, dont do it if it hurts, means something is not working yet.

Will trigger all sort of problems and you can deal with them outside songs. Helped and is helping me big time. :)

Does not replace legatto trainning of course, but will help to keep emission together.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...