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A couple of questions

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Ozone
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So I've been practicing singing for a while now and I've noticed that I can access my head voice a lot better on certain vowels. I can get into head voice with pretty much any vowel but while vocalizing with a U sound(U as in You) it sound much more "pleasant". And with a vowel like an A (A as in Alphabet) it sounds and feels a bit tense. I can also hear a little bit of unintentional vocal fry while vocalizing on an A sound. What kind of exercises should I be doing to smooth out my head voice on all vowels and get rid tension?

I've also got another thing I want to ask you guys. I'm in my high schools choir (I'm a tenor) and we've got some semi-high lines (topping at F4). I've been having a real hard time trying to sing those notes without getting too loud. It's not like I have to shout the notes out or anything it's just that most of those high notes have to be sung really quietly. Any tips or exercises you guys would like to share to make me be able to sing high notes quietly without sounding thin.

Last but not least I've been going to this classical singing teacher for nearly a mouth now but I can't really see any progress. My teacher, being classically trained and all that, is in to the whole "sounding like your singing in one register no matter how high or low"-thing. Because of that all we really do is sing a couple of warm ups and after that we sing some songs a couple times that never to any higher than Eb4. I don't think that that method of teaching is really practical for me cause I also sing in a band and my highest parts are usually around Ab4-Bb4. I think I need to find a teacher who could teach me stuff I could apply to my singing from the get-go. But at the same time I'll probably get something useful out of classical singing if I just carry on like this... What do you guys think?

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i'll talk to the first part.

i learned from anthony frisell...

there are vowels that engage head voice musculature more easily than other vowels. the narrow characteristic of the "oo" vowel engages the most head voice musculature for its production vs. an "ah" vowel which engages the most chest voice musculature.

the narrowness inherant in the "oo" vowel acts like a tension release valve to allow you access to the higher notes with minimal tension.

if you exercise the head voice musculature using the "oo" vowel you will build strength in the head voice over time.

the "oo" vowel is one of the most underated vowels.

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For singing the F4, sing it on the same vocal level as head voice or light humming. If your classical voice is being held back by too much chest or in any other manner, you really aren't training your classical voice. You might think that you need to maintain a chesty sound, but that's really not developmental, so let your voice lighten up.

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1 month of lessons is not enough to evaluate anything. Are you working breathing and relaxation? How are those things comming? Began on support?

Does your teacher sings well? Is the quality that he demonstrates something that you would want to have for yourself?

Crappy singing with claims of one register and technique = run away from him right now.

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Yeah we've mostly been working on support and I think I've pretty much got it down. The way I know is that I'm not straining anymore and I have a lot better tone on the high notes(even though my teacher never teaches me anything about sing high..). My teachers a she, and she's a good singer and all that but I'm not sure that I'd like have the same kinda tone as her, mostly because I sing in a rock band and not an aspiring operatic tenor or anything like that... But I've pretty much come to the conclusion that I'm gonna find a teacher better suited for my style anyway.

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If your teacher isn't teaching you how to expand your range and you want to learn how to expand your range, get a new teacher.

My teacher had me doing range expansion exercises from the first lesson. It wasn't the ONLY thing we worked on the beginning, but it was one of them.

The idea that you have to learn X, Y, and Z before you work on your range is bullshit IMO. You can and should be working on developing a three octave range simultaneously with working on other aspects of vocal technique.

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