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Descending Slides Question

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When descending from the head voice musculature on an 'oo' vowel and there is an abrupt sound (break) how do I deal with it? Do I just go "through" the break and allow the clashing of registers to occur or should I just slide as low as I can without breaking?

What is the proper way to utlize descending slides on "'oo" and "ee" vowels? Wouldn't "breaking" be counterproductive and actually 'train' the feeling of a break?

Hope someone can shed some light on this, thank you! :)

- JayMC

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I liked Frisell's approach. When descending a slide, lighten up on the volume and weight. So that your low notes are softer. This can also help erase the break. It's part of what he means about letting "head voice" controls have predominance.

He also warned that one might lose their absolute lowest notes. At which time, it is time to fish or cut bait. Are you a tenor? Then train like one. Start in tenor and then, stay there.

I am not sure if he phrased that the same way in the baritone book as I have only read the tenor book.

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I certainly haven't mastered this but I have made some progress. It take awhile. A long while. I have been singing for a long time but only actively "learning" for a year and a half. Just this passed September 20th (yes, I marked the date) I started to ease through my break more easily. Not completely and seamlessly but much better. It was definitely a breakthrough. But that was a couple of months ago and it's still slow going. And sometimes I loose it.

So it takes time (unless I'm particularly slow ) :D

But for me I call it closing a window. I ascend and descend. I map out where my break is and then what I did was lighten as I get to it, become a little airy (falsetto) then close up the cords again as I get through and continue up. Then I do it down using the map I created on the way up. Well....now I know where it is...that was at the start. But what I am doing over time is taking that airy part out little by little. Less air, more closure. I am slowly "closing the window," letting less and less air pass through. When I say little by little you have no idea....:D

Good luck. Keep working. Maybe you have more patience than I. I just wanna sing man....this is gets too complicated at times. :D (but I practice anyway)

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But for me I call it closing a window. I ascend and descend. I map out where my break is and then what I did was lighten as I get to it, become a little airy (falsetto) then close up the cords again as I get through and continue up. Then I do it down using the map I created on the way up. Well....now I know where it is...that was at the start. But what I am doing over time is taking that airy part out little by little. Less air, more closure. I am slowly "closing the window," letting less and less air pass through.

Sounds similar, in effect, to "lift up - pull back." Essentially, ease up in the passaggio. And that is mental. Many assume they are just going to blast every note from top to bottom. And that might be fine but then, where are the dynamics of the song, itself?

Now, there are some singers who stick with one volume level but they also stay in one part of a range for just about the entire song. Brian Johnson comes to mind. Not a lot of change in volume but also not a lot of change in range. He's all high, all loud, all the time. Which is fine for the aesethetic of the band that he is in. It's made him enough money to have collection of antique cars and his own racing team, which can race rally sport and F-1.

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Sounds similar, in effect, to "lift up - pull back."

Very well could be. It isn't anything I just came up with myself. I have read so much here and in books and videos etc that it's all just information in my head. I try things, either use them or discard them or at times just add them to the ole' toolbox. So sometimes I'm doing things that may just have come from a book or a thread here. Or maybe something someone said here makes a light bulb go on. :) But, whatever I do I tend to just use what I read as a template and then retrofit it to me.

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When descending from the head voice musculature on an 'oo' vowel and there is an abrupt sound (break) how do I deal with it? Do I just go "through" the break and allow the clashing of registers to occur or should I just slide as low as I can without breaking?

What is the proper way to utlize descending slides on "'oo" and "ee" vowels? Wouldn't "breaking" be counterproductive and actually 'train' the feeling of a break?

Hope someone can shed some light on this, thank you! :)

- JayMC

jay, slide as low as you can without breaking, let up on the volume and add a little extra support at the bottom to keep it from breaking apart.

keep the placement heady...no chest (for this particular exercise for this goal). i promise you you will feel it begin to strenghthen and you will be amazed what that turns into.

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just another variation..yes, yodeling can be good..if you can yodel with ease it's indicative of a relaxed vocal tract.

when you work the head voice musculature (of the frisell kind) you must have a very open throat and be free of tension as well.

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