Jump to content

A good test to know if I support is correctly working.

Rate this topic


Consumingfire39
 Share

Recommended Posts

*My support

This is something that has worked for me lately and hopefully can work for others.

When my support is not right, which has been the majority of my short singing life, I cannot sing while looking straight up into the air. Lately, when supporting well, I can look straight up with the front of my neck fully extended and really feel no difference at all and even feel a little better than normal in some areas of my voice.

I don't know the science behind this but it is impossible for me to manage the air with my throat and sing with that looking up posture. Feel free to try this and give me some feedback.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

ConsumingFire: That sounds very interesting. Can you explain in more detail? I have times around D5, E5 that my voice just stops on of one those notes and then then next notes are fine. THen sometimes when I try it again it works fine... I wonder if its more of the same issue you are having.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

i really don't think this more than a coinsidence. simply put, if you can sing a note in a comfortable part of your range steady for more than 20 seconds with no loss of air you are very likely engaging support.

but again, there varying levels of support all depending on what you are singing and trying to sound like, the note you're singing, etc.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

i really don't think this more than a coinsidence. simply put, if you can sing a note in a comfortable part of your range steady for more than 20 seconds with no loss of air you are very likely engaging support.

but again, there varying levels of support all depending on what you are singing and trying to sound like, the note you're singing, etc.

20 Seconds with the head straight up? I cannot even make a quality tone with my head like that without a very strong support.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm glad you finally caught that, Bob. That is the first thing I saw, coming into this thread. Do NOT look up for high notes. You (in general) are pulling everything you need out of alignment. Stop it.

That's my "tough love" for the day. Stop it. Right now.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Renee Fleming learned, after decades of singing, that minute adjustments, and I do mean really small adjustments, in the angle of her head up and down, made all the difference. Most times she struggled, it was because she was looking up too much. And she traced it, at times, to how the lighting was. In a smaller theater, the lights are closer they command more of your attention and you inadvertantly look up.

But, what does she know? She's only been singing professionally for something like 3 or 4 decades. Probably doesn't know anything, right?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...