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How I learnt support

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p_n_g
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My teacher taught me a way to help me use support on evey note.

He taught me that support is equally important at all part of the voice, not just the higher ( more demanding ) ones.

The exercise was the following:

Take a two or three slow and deep breath. At the last breath, imagine that you are under the water, and have to stop breathing.

Hold back the air for about 5-10 seconds, and suddenly release it.

If you feel or sometimes hear a loud pop at your throat/glottis, it means that you let your diaphragm collapse, and all of the air that was inside your lungs was pressuring your glottis, and you resisted it by using the throat muscles.

This happens also when you sing, and let the diaphragm collapse. All of the air suddenly pushes out your vocal folds, and you have to resist it, which will result in a strained voice, and also makes your voice tired.

How to not let the diaphragm collapse.

Use the same breathing, but on the third inhale suddenly stop inhaling, but let your throat remain open. Just like if you suddenly don't know what to do. Just like you pushed the pause button on a player ( not the stop button! )

You will feel a little pressure at the lower abdomen, as it tries to resist the diaphragm to collapse or contract any more,

Use the same breathing, but now pause on the exhaling part, also without using any throat muscles.

Now use this exercise to experience this balancing, experience with a little amount of air and also with big amount of air. If you do this, you will find that you can easily control your breath without any support from the glottis/thorat muscles.

Whenever you sing, and feel you have some pressure in your neck area, just adjust your support, release more air, or just hold back some. If you did the exercises you will find that all of your tones come out more steadily and with more resonance.

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My teacher taught me a way to help me use support on evey note.

He taught me that support is equally important at all part of the voice, not just the higher ( more demanding ) ones.

The exercise was the following:

Take a two or three slow and deep breath. At the last breath, imagine that you are under the water, and have to stop breathing.

Hold back the air for about 5-10 seconds, and suddenly release it.

If you feel or sometimes hear a loud pop at your throat/glottis, it means that you let your diaphragm collapse, and all of the air that was inside your lungs was pressuring your glottis, and you resisted it by using the throat muscles.

This happens also when you sing, and let the diaphragm collapse. All of the air suddenly pushes out your vocal folds, and you have to resist it, which will result in a strained voice, and also makes your voice tired.

How to not let the diaphragm collapse.

Use the same breathing, but on the third inhale suddenly stop inhaling, but let your throat remain open. Just like if you suddenly don't know what to do. Just like you pushed the pause button on a player ( not the stop button! )

You will feel a little pressure at the lower abdomen, as it tries to resist the diaphragm to collapse or contract any more,

Use the same breathing, but now pause on the exhaling part, also without using any throat muscles.

Now use this exercise to experience this balancing, experience with a little amount of air and also with big amount of air. If you do this, you will find that you can easily control your breath without any support from the glottis/thorat muscles.

Whenever you sing, and feel you have some pressure in your neck area, just adjust your support, release more air, or just hold back some. If you did the exercises you will find that all of your tones come out more steadily and with more resonance.

i did a lot of support work, still do...i actually have gotten my support to a point where i feel like the outer part of my lower core goes up while the middle of my core goes down.

hard to describe but it makes everything else up top (base of the neck up) so "adjustable."

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I'm extremely lucky I've never had to give this a second thought. This is supposed to be the hard part. Learning how to breathe correctly all the time is the key. I breath with with very little movement with my diaphragm. My lungs feel invisible when I breath. There's actually two configurations for your diaphragm. The entire diaphragm can either be like two drivers working in parallel or one big driver due to the way it changes shape and the similar shape it produces with each one. It either looks like an m or it look like an n, if that makes sense. I find the former works for chest voice and the latter works for head voice. Like anything the change is gradual.

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I'm extremely lucky I've never had to give this a second thought. This is supposed to be the hard part. Learning how to breathe correctly all the time is the key. I breath with with very little movement with my diaphragm. My lungs feel invisible when I breath. There's actually two configurations for your diaphragm. The entire diaphragm can either be like two drivers working in parallel or one big driver due to the way it changes shape and the similar shape it produces with each one. It either looks like an m or it look like an n, if that makes sense. I find the former works for chest voice and the latter works for head voice. Like anything the change is gradual.

That is a unique perspective and one that I have not encountered, before.

I did have to work on my breathing, for two reasons.

First, as a child, I had asthma and this affects the way you breathe, especially during an attack.

Second, I would approach singing, sometimes, from the way that one speaks. Problem is, the breathing for speaking that one learns in one's region of influence is not always conducive to singing. I really do believe that you do not sing as you speak, unless you already speak as if singing.

I might be an ignorant redneck for thinking that, but I'm stuck with it.

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I definitely don't sing in the same manner at all as I speak. I talk with my folds almost completely open (without it sounding breathy) and when I don't correct this action while singing, the results are disastrous. I completely agree that some people talk like they are singing and that is the sole reason that the movement is the same for them. Then again, don't take my word for it since I had some pretty unusual circumstances behind learning how to talk to begin with and all that stuff that I've mentioned before.

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I noticed a difference too between singing and speaking.

When I started singing, or should I write, singing correctly ( with good posture/breathing ), my speaking voice has also improved.

Also I noticed, that if I warmed-up and speak with my normal habit, it essentially warms-down me, but if I speak the correct way( as if I'm singing ), it makes me more warmed-up.

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Also I noticed, that if I warmed-up and speak with my normal habit, it essentially warms-down me, but if I speak the correct way( as if I'm singing ), it makes me more warmed-up.

Some authors have called that resonant speaking. A good exercise from Roger Love is to say the word "hello" and hold the note on "o." That is the relaxed center of your speaking voice, which is likely higher than you normally try to speak.

This was key for me in getting over the childish notion that I was going to "grow up" and get a "real man's" voice, i.e., deep baritone. To quote the 7-up commercial, "never had it, never will." Point being, if you allow your breathing apparatus to work freely and let your speaking voice resonate, you will be "resonant speaking." And likley, your mates in your home town will think you are weird. Then it's up to you. Are you one of the herd of sheep, or are you a singer? I support your choice, either way.

:D

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I've found that it's not so necessary to breathe in a good deal of air so long as there is movement in the abs and sufficient breathing. This works particularly well for me on high notes. Breath support is secondary when you know what role the larynx, pharynx, soft palate and oral cavity plays in singing - that's where the notes are!

Adveser from RYM? Guess they didn't appreciate your 7 octave range there. :lol:

The one and only. They seemed to want to argue that it was impossible. Back then, I had a six octave range and now It's more like 8+ octaves since I'm not including tones below 10hz even though I can get down to 0.5hz. When I tried to record a song using all of it, the low notes between E-1 and E1 weren't even included since at the time it was almost impossible to sing with those in the context of a whole song or with any stability. I was dreadful back then at actually singing even with such a range. It's difficult to learn how to sing with that many notes.

Anyway I'm going to take back the part about the lungs. I feel like now, as opposed to a few days ago, that I need to bring the chest down and at an angle to get the most out of it. It becomes so much of a second nature reflex to exhaling notes that it can go forgotten until I stop doing it, then I have problems getting power into the lower parts of the vocal folds.

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Very cool way to explain it. So is that a recent change for you? And do you think it was more caused by better coordination or better strength?

a bit of both, but making myself stronger down below has helped me immeasurably...can't begin to explain what this does for your voice.

i swear by developing the lower core, learning how to really inhale quick and deep (without drawing or sucking in air), and learning to control exhalation.

not a big deal, 10-20 minutes a day, all the basic exercises....

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  • 10 months later...

ok this semms to be very helpful but( and yes, I think I'm mistaking something) if I let my throath open, I feel I little quantity of air coming out of my mouth, is it normal?

If I try to don't allow the air to flow out of my body I close my throath. How should I do it ?

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ok this semms to be very helpful but( and yes, I think I'm mistaking something) if I let my throath open, I feel I little quantity of air coming out of my mouth, is it normal?

If I try to don't allow the air to flow out of my body I close my throath. How should I do it ?

Take the throat out of the equation. With proper breath management, the throat can do whatever it needs to do. "Open Throat" is a sound of power and clarity, rather than an actual physical openness. When you do the things like twang, resonating behind the soft palate, tongue height, whatever, it is actually a channeled and trained tube of resonance. "Open Throat" is a misnomer.

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Ron is talking about something different. In this exercise you actually do want the "throat" open or technically the glottis open.

And I think it is normal for there to be some air floating around. I have only toyed with this exercise though I couldn't say for sure that I've mastered it because I haven't had a coach check it out. But it seemed very easy to me and as Felipe has described (and someone else first mentioned) it's more like pausing the airflow rather than stopping it. You make no attempt to lock it inside, you just stop pushing it in or out and kinda just float in that position, very relaxed.

I think?

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ok this semms to be very helpful but( and yes, I think I'm mistaking something) if I let my throath open, I feel I little quantity of air coming out of my mouth, is it normal?

If I try to don't allow the air to flow out of my body I close my throath. How should I do it ?

Imagine a situation where you got very surprised/startled. When a fast gulp of air happens and you hold it back.

Feel the muscles that hold the air in that situation, and replicate the sensation. Should help you doing THIS.

Does not mean that it will help you much on singing just like this, although it surely can become something very good.

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