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Tilted larynx?

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MDEW
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What is the difference between Cricoid tilt and Thyroid Tilt? ( Audio example or How to ... )

If I am singing in head voice can I assume that my larynx has tilted? ( In falsetto does the larynx have to be tilted? ... )

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Neither the cricoid or the thyroid cartilages rest on fixed positions, muscles stabilizes their positions and if you tilt one, the other must follow or be held in place through another set of muscles.

So the actions occurs on both, the result is pretty much the same and the perceived positions derive more from the shape it forms depending on the height of the larynx.

The quality you seek is best described as: "if you are going to cry, then please cry like a man for christ sake!"

Pretend that you are deeply emoted with something, get the feeling of crying and then try to speak normally into this state. Its exagerated, but its kinda like this.

I like more indirect approaches. Crying too much is annoying and unballances emission. As Owen said, it prety much resolves on its own, resonance tracking is much more precise.

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:) Thanks Owen,

If things are happening naturally then yes the information is useless. But I am not sure that things are happening naturally for me at the moment.

But one of the things you mentioned was a piece of the puzzle that I was missing. Thyroid tilt is associated with low larynx. Cricoid is associated with high larynx. That is something I have not seen stated clearly.

I am aware that my larynx has a tendency to rise at the beginning of words regardless of singing or speaking.

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Thank you all for your information.

I was aware that thyroid tilt lengthens the cords and cricoid thickens or shortens the cords.

The cricoid tilt is something that I really do not understand.

Overdrive, Belting, shouting, these use cricoid past passaggio in the higher area.

If I am getting loud or excited I usually have a deeper sound and my voice gets lower. Other people when they get loud or excited tend to get higher in their vocalizations. I never learned how to shout.

I do not know how to engage a cricoid tilt.

I do know how to cry and I asure you Felipe I always at least try to cry like a man.

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As for your tendency, are you looking at the larynx to determine that? Stop doing that. One of the things that confused the hell out of me was this "neutral larynx" ideal. That term is so easily misinterpreted and basically altogether false.

Amen.

"When I sing, I feel as if I have no throat, at all."

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:) its a start.

Dont waste your energy with this. If you want to understand it better, look for the anatomy of the larynx and medical data on the muscles. The CT muscle so popular around here is the main participant of this process and it opposes the TA contraction.

Together with many other muscles both intrinsic and extrinsic the phonation is produced. The basic emission quality comes from the folds vibratory movement which is in turn set and stabilized by these muscles.

The cartilages form a joint, a "tilt" affects the stretch of the folds and its inclination in relation to the air applied. Overcomplications of a process that normally do not require intervention. If the muscles are not contracting, crying a bit into the sound may help, but can easily become a break in the registration.

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I posted a song here on the forum and was told that it sounded like I started with a good posture but larynx shifted as soon as a tone started. More so at passaggio area than on a lower note.

At the time I was not trying to keep track of anything just emote to whatever felt right to me.

The only reason that I am concerned with the larynx position or tilting at the moment is the fact that something is not doing what it is supposed to.

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And, actually, there are more muscles involved than just the TA and CT. Certainly more than I can remember or pronounced. And when people talked about strengthening muscles and I would ask which of those muscles, chirpping crickets was the reply.

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I know that there are muscles that connect the tongue and soft palet to the hyoid bone. There are muscles that connect the hyoid to the larynx and muscles that connect larynx to sternum. These are the muscles that help with thyroid tilt. These muscles can be brought under conscious control and can be strengthened.

Also there are muscles that connect larynx to the collar bones. These can help stabilize the larynx and provide a pivot point for the larynx.

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Without sounding sarcastic.. I would love if any of you guys could demonstrate this and show how it helps you with singing..I understand how the TA and CT work with each other but it sounds like you guys really have a grasp of all this tilting. So let me be your guinea pig and teach me how to be the leaning(tilting) tower of vocals. It sounds like I'm way behind and could learn something here.Im being serious.. I know about sobbing and crying and all that but it sounds like I'm missing something..whoever has got these secrets better stop bogarting that joint:)

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Without sounding sarcastic.. I would love if any of you guys could demonstrate this and show how it helps you with singing..I understand how the TA and CT work with each other but it sounds like you guys really have a grasp of all this tilting. So let me be your guinea pig and teach me how to be the leaning(tilting) tower of vocals. It sounds like I'm way behind and could learn something here.Im being serious.. I know about sobbing and crying and all that but it sounds like I'm missing something..whoever has got these secrets better stop bogarting that joint:)

I remember that song, man, a blast from the past.

And my point about all the different muscles is that I don't really know. And the less I worry about what's in the throat, the better for me. And some of those muscles are really small and I just don't think they can "beef up" all that much, judging from what I know of musclebuilding from the days when I would lift weights every other day. I could butterfly 110 lbs with cast iron free weights. 135 lb on a machine. So, I know how muscles build, the general run of what muscles do. And that, to me, and I could totally be wrong and probably am, singing is more about coordination for endurance than it is a dead lift of one's own body weight.

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Without sounding sarcastic.. I would love if any of you guys could demonstrate this and show how it helps you with singing..I understand how the TA and CT work with each other but it sounds like you guys really have a grasp of all this tilting. So let me be your guinea pig and teach me how to be the leaning(tilting) tower of vocals. It sounds like I'm way behind and could learn something here.Im being serious.. I know about sobbing and crying and all that but it sounds like I'm missing something..whoever has got these secrets better stop bogarting that joint:)

I don't know any thing that is why I ask questions. I cannot do these things.

But I found a book by Dr. Feuchtinger. In it he goes over the different muscles that connect to the larynx.

Almost every good singer that you see has a groove in their tongue as they sing. Feuchtinger says this groove is from engaging the Hyoglossus muscle. And you can strengthen it.

I have seen the same muscular connections that I described earlier in other books which describe "Headvoice" musculature.

As soon as I find a link to the pdf I will post it.

As far as using this info to sing I cannot. I look to you and Felipe, Ron,Rob,Rach,Bob....... to help keep me from making an a%% of myself.

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Y

Laryngeal muscles increse in: Strength, endurance, speed, precision, "smoothness" of neuromuscular coordinations and bulk. And increased demand on mucosal tissues produces the adaptive micro-level changes that increases tissues resilience and "toughening". (Bodymind & Voice, 2000)

I guess it isn't the literal interpretation of building the muscles. It's kind of like building hand strength or grip. You don't necessarily build muscular hands. But you do increase grip strength, flexibility, dexterity etc.

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Conditioning, I agree, as far as endurance goes. Certainly, some conditioning in order to complete a show length program, whatever show you are doing.

And I think of the few times someone comes in complaining that their voice is cracking on a few notes. And they list that they practice warm-ups for an hour, sing new songs for another hour, then go and perform cover tunes for 4 hours, teach others for an hour, go to church and sing in choir for an hour, all in the same day.

Really? And the fatigue in your voice is still a mystery? Even long distance runners do not run all day, every day. And the rest the day before a competition.

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