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D.Starr
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My new singing teacher is really awesome and has introduced a lot of new things to me that is helping a lot, so I thought I'd share them. In no particular order.

#1 FORWARD THINKING

Instead of thinking up and back, which made me pull the sound into the back of my throat and it would become dull and muffled and rather sunk back. He thought me to think forward as I sang higher up in my registers. This helps me keep forward placement in my "mask" as well as not allowing the sound to sink back. You could argue that it could lead to shouting but keeping the volume the same and the correct tonal shifts to happen this doesn't become a problem.

#2 JAW TENSION

I tend to stick my jaw forward as I sing higher up which obviously causes problems. A few techniques he has taught me is to only allow my jaw to drop down. Nice and loose and free to move. 2 things have helped me with this, wobbling my jaw from side to side as I do sirens and scales to keep it moving and not lock. The second being to place, not hold, my hands either side of my mouth. This one in particular has helped me a lot.

#3 MOVEMENT

This is going to contradict the first one of forward thinking but as I've stated above, I tend to stick my jaw out as I go higher. He had me step back on certain words that were on A4 that I were struggling with in order to get me to stop thinking I have to forward and up. Sounds crazy but it actually helped. I guess it "tricks" you into disregarding the forward movement with your body. It's all mental.

#4 SUPPORT

He has agreed and I think we can all agree everyone has their own opinion when it comes to singing. I tend to push and pull with my support and never comfortably found it. I always held a noble chest and allowed my abs to move freely, I did however tend to tense and end up pushing and constricting on the top notes. We started a few scales in order to find a suitable form of support, the exercise is like so.

Start with a vocalised zzz, fff or vvv. Not too hard, not too soft, you're not trying to make a massive buzz but the buzz wants to be there. It needs to be a steady stream, no jumps in breath, no stopping or starting. Feel a firmness just under the ribcage, not rock solid. From there move slowly from zzz, fff or vvv to ee. Keep the feeling the same, not blowing out air. Make the ee buzz in your nose but not nasal. I did a 5 tone scale of...

VVV > EE > AIR > AH

(I'm not sure what the actual vowel spelling of the AIR vowel is, I just know it sounds like air, my apologies)

The VVV, EEE, AIR is on the same starting note. Make sure it is legato, all the vowels are continuous, no stops.

Always remember to think forward, the next vowel is always infront, not sunk back. Forward placement thinking.

This has helped me to keep the support there, not strained and has helped when singing as well.

I have a few more things, I should make some audio samples.

If you have any questions feel free to ask and if you want me to make some audio samples I will. Let me know.

JUST FOUND THIS! GREAT!

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RE: forward thinking.

I have known about bringing the voice forward, so to speak, for some time. Or at least had an idea of it. When I first learned it my singing improved just by bringing it forward and up in the mask. Actually I had various forms of this including the roof of the mouth. But recently I have been introduced to it in more detail along with exercises to reinforce as well as tune it in; and have received better information and understanding of it and it has made a great difference.

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My new singing teacher is really awesome and has introduced a lot of new things to me that is helping a lot, so I thought I'd share them. In no particular order.

#1 FORWARD THINKING

Instead of thinking up and back, which made me pull the sound into the back of my throat and it would become dull and muffled and rather sunk back. He thought me to think forward as I sang higher up in my registers. This helps me keep forward placement in my "mask" as well as not allowing the sound to sink back. You could argue that it could lead to shouting but keeping the volume the same and the correct tonal shifts to happen this doesn't become a problem.

Because you are now using resonant cavities are the right size for the notes involved. Dr Fillebrown physically saw the maxilliary sinus cavities in his practice. Singing forward in the mask is a real thing.

It's all mental.

Man, that sounds vaguely familiar. :D

He has agreed and I think we can all agree everyone has their own opinion when it comes to singing.

Amen.

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#1 FORWARD THINKING

Instead of thinking up and back, which made me pull the sound into the back of my throat and it would become dull and muffled and rather sunk back. He thought me to think forward as I sang higher up in my registers. This helps me keep forward placement in my "mask" as well as not allowing the sound to sink back. You could argue that it could lead to shouting but keeping the volume the same and the correct tonal shifts to happen this doesn't become a problem.

This is interesting.

I'm singing in a choir and our teacher/conductor said the always imagine the sound going up and back. However when I'm seem to struggling with some note, if I just imagine that is it is "placed at the front" of the nasal cavities, the sound becomes more effortless.

But the problem with this, if I do this, my voice will be too different from the other member of the choir, and our conductor just doesn't like this.

Does this mean, that I have to sing with the wrong placement in the choir?

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if I just imagine that is it is "placed at the front" of the nasal cavities, the sound becomes more effortless.

But the problem with this, if I do this, my voice will be too different from the other member of the choir, and our conductor just doesn't like this.

Does this mean, that I have to sing with the wrong placement in the choir?

Yes, it does. Singing choir is murder on the voice because you are required to blend, to hold back, to reduce vibrato, reduce the character of your voice to something homogenous that fades into the background.

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As angelic and beautiful choir singing can be, it is limiting. Forced to blend in the background and not be individual with your voice.

I've never been in a choir so I can't comment on techniques they use. I can see why people do and don't like choir teachings. You lose the ability to stand out and own the stage and captivate the audience. Yes you could be a solo choir boy who stands and sings to the heavens, in my eyes it just doesn't hold that weight and character.

Stand out. Be an individual.

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Yes, I agree choir singing is limiting, but I think this is limiting only in being an individual.

There are some benefits of this, also

.

Remember singing correctly is at first hearing correctly.

I've learnt very much from singing in a choir about harmonies - it's actually very hard to stay on pitch where from the other side notes come which are dissonant to your note ( because it is a powerful but dissonant chord ), and you have to keep the pitch the same and consistent.

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D.Starr: I put in a few comments, interspersed.

My new singing teacher is really awesome and has introduced a lot of new things to me that is helping a lot, so I thought I'd share them. In no particular order.

#1 FORWARD THINKING

=Consistent twang.

#2 JAW TENSION

=Jaw posture/freedom, and formant tuning for resonance.

#3 MOVEMENT

Movement is the physical and emotional enemy of rigidity.

#4 SUPPORT

Yea!

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Yes, it does. Singing choir is murder on the voice because you are required to blend, to hold back, to reduce vibrato, reduce the character of your voice to something homogenous that fades into the background.

ronws: It all depends on the choral concept of the directors. Perhaps I have been lucky, but I've been singing in choirs for 50 years, and nobody ever asked me to reduce my vibrato, or to 'blend', 'hold' back', etc.

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ronws: It all depends on the choral concept of the directors. Perhaps I have been lucky, but I've been singing in choirs for 50 years, and nobody ever asked me to reduce my vibrato, or to 'blend', 'hold' back', etc.

I stand corrected. And I am glad you chimed in. Too bad it took me making a grandiose generalization to get your attention.

:D

So, what would cause, say, a guy doing a tour of choir music to lose his clarity and stability in his top end?

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d,

just realize that singing in the mask is not the be all, end all, way....there will be times (it all depends) where you will be going up and back with the tone. you will get to a point where you will start to sense where the air needs to go per vowel, per note, per your own particular voice.

you will basically become your own formant tuner!

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Yeah I'm finding I'm having to modify a few things as I get higher. It's helping stay connected and twang more.

The feeling kind of disappears as you rise up obviously because the sympathetic vibration just isn't there. I'm learning to "let go" and let it find it's own path but still have control.

It's trying to put it all into a bridging as well. I've strayed away from "I WANT TO HIT C5!!!" and more focused on, how can I release the pressure from ym neck, stop straining and connect "chest" & "head". More focused on C4-G4 at the moment with it being the first steps up into head. Rather than attempting to master A4 upwards seen as C4 upwards isn't mastered.

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when you don't have the requisite development, a4 and up can feel totally out of reach...like "how the hell am i ever going to get up there?".....but in time the vocal folds will develop a better hold and flexibility, especially when they are "relieved" to do what they do best...make pitch changes.

the support is what helps by repositioning or redirecting the effort so that the everything up top is free.

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