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Why don't you sound like the stars on radio and CDs?

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I don't think this article really revealed anything most of us didn't know already, and although it states that one shouldn't let technology be a reason to not learn how to sing, there will inevitably be those who will disregard that completely. The downside of this, of course, will be the embarrassment they will feel if they're ever faced with having to sing a cappella in a minimal setting with no toys.

I think greater emphasis should have been put on this fact in the article.

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Here's a question-- Is anybody here using auto tune in a live setting? I know there are processors out there that'll do it, but just curious if anybody's done it.

Speaking of "technology can take care of the rest"- You kids must not remember the famous Brady Bunch "Johnny Bravo" episode. As far back as the early 70s (and farther back of course) there were issues of the producer tweaking the voice so much in the recording process that it because unrecognizable from the artist's true voice... Little Greg Brady found out the hard way.

And Greg Brady was quite an artiste, wasn't he??

:)

Funny that the same things still go on.

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Yes its quite common Billy, for a few hundred bucks you can have chromatic tunning with the click of a button. The one I have, correct XT totally sux in that function, but I know a few supposed to be singers who use it live and the audience does not seem to care... With a good equipment... well you get the idea ...

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It depends, you can program it to do a number of things. CorrectXT is chromatic, so it just sends the voice to the nearest semitone.With more refined equipment. You can program it to work only within a scale, or even lock the drummer on a click track and follow a midi track. Not to mention formant correction, which in my opinion is much more important than pitch correction.

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Felipe- Is that XT the TC-Helicon deal? I have the Harmony G-XT which is a little harmonizer and it also has pitch correction in it. I thought of using it for a solo gig for harmonies but while it worked on some things, it wasn't that great on others. Great idea, but it's just not going to work in a solo situation. I didn't really mess with the autopitch too much. The Voicelive I've heard is really great, but it looks like you have to be a computer scientist to work the thing. No thanks! Some stars out there are using rackmount auto tuners I believe. They can get that Cher affect (my God, the producer who did that just really needs to be on Santa's naughty list forever...!), but they can also get it so that if you're very close to the note, just a bit pitchy, it can reel you in live. The pitch goes out your mouth, into the mic, down the wire and into the processor and out the PA all corrected. I think if you were singing and heard the output while you were doing it (say the processor was fed through your monitors) I bet it'd really screw you up. Better to learn to sing on pitch, but you know, there are a lot of singers that have issues with that. Freddie Mercury (vocal god) was horrendously off pitch on a lot of recordings I've seen. Many others too. It'd be nice to have something to keep you in line, but yeah, it's kind of cheating. But man, if you were doing expressive slides or something, I can't believe it'd not sound fake.

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Billy, Ive heard more than once live bands doing voice overs during shows, using a playback and lip sincs. Its more common than the autotune, some singers that were supposed to be vocal gods too actually.

But there is hope. Check out a Joss Stone concert if you have the opportunity, even if its not your thing. Its impressive and quite pop :).

Oh the correct XT is not very usefull for this purpose, I like the feedback reduction and the dynamics. Handy and good quality.

Jens yeah I agree completely.

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Autotune, lipsyncing, magic...

Bahhh. I don't get it. How money hungry are some people? Maybe my ego is too huge :D I just want to impress...naturally. Even in my years of training. Lifting weights, athletics, fighting, whatever I did; I would never follow what many were doing which was taking supplements and steroids etc to enhance performance. If anyone thought I was good at what I did, I wanted it to be natural and worked for.

I cannot and I repeat "cannot!" be proud of myself if I take shortcuts. I will not take shortcuts.

Joss Stone is great. Although I considerd her Blues. haven't listened to her in awhile though (years), maybe she changed.

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I auditioned for a band once and thought their existing-singer-guitarist sounded way better than I that day. Couldn't figure out why I couldn't make sounds work. Turns out they didn't tell me a voice modulation machine was on.

So rule 1 for auditioning-- ask them to turn it off, or bring your own :)

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The thing is also, great producers will Always have great supersingers avalible to them if they want to. But to be honest imperfections makes alot more intresting singers Than the one's with perfect technique.

And i belive many singers forget that, you can have the best technique in the world and still not get your point across to the audience.

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I mentioned this before in other threads on recording, and etcetera. So, I'll mention it again.

And I get this info from having read 4 different books on recording and production. Professional producers or recording engineers producing recordings for record labels (these are the guys that get 10 percent of your 12.5 percent on the album deal, so yeah, it's all about the money) autotune EVERYTHIING.

They autotune the track of guitar licks. They auto-tune the bass and drum tracks. They autotune the rhythm guitar parts. They autotune the singer, regardless of who it is. Yes, producers and recordists will lie to the singer and say "No, I did not auto-tune you." And when you step out to go to the bathroom or whatever, they auto-tune, anyway. I am not making it up, I am not exaggerating. Any one can get books on recording and read it for themselves.

Do we like to autotune when we do our own mixes? No. Do we fancy ourselves producers? Maybe. But a professional producer paying on a mortgage and a car note is going to autotune.

I don't agree with that practice. For it also sets up false expectations in the average listener. They hear the perfect product and then go to see a live performance and it's not the same, unless the singer is using similar equipment, live.

But I would rather hear a singer live, without modification. Breath-takes, coughing off mic during a guitar break. That's where it's at, for me.

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Billy, Ive heard more than once live bands doing voice overs during shows, using a playback and lip sincs. Its more common than the autotune, some singers that were supposed to be vocal gods too actually.

But there is hope. Check out a Joss Stone concert if you have the opportunity, even if its not your thing. Its impressive and quite pop :).

Oh the correct XT is not very usefull for this purpose, I like the feedback reduction and the dynamics. Handy and good quality.

Jens yeah I agree completely.

Right, I've got friends in one of the "Franchise" club bands out there and yeah, there are a ton of vocal tracks flown in. However, the singer in these particular bands (there are a few of them that they do-same band, different formats) and the guy is a KILLER singer. So it's not because he can't sing. It may be just to keep up with the load on the voice. In one of my bands, we fly in keyboard parts and I've recorded a few backup vocals for a few songs. Normally, we do our own harmonies, but there are some parts that the other guys couldn't do, so I recorded them. I'm not so much worried about backing tracks as long as the band is doing most of the stuff live. I was more interested if anyone was using autotune for their shows and what their experience was. Not cuz I want to use it, but more just that I'm curious about it.

Speaking of pedals, etc.- we auditioned a bass player once. He had a few pedals for his voice. It had reverb and doubling on it. Sounded absolutely horrible. Pedals and gimmicks are neato, but if you don't know how to work them, best leave them at home. He had a lot of stuff on his bass too that just thinned out the tone and sounded awful as well. We asked him to turn all of it off for the audition. He didn't get the gig.

Regarding autotune on recordings- I've got some friends that just did an album. The music sounds great. But the producer decided to use some kind of autotune on the vocals- completely botched the production and the album (to me) sounds terrible because of it. The guy's in the band are great singers. Rather than autotune it, they should've just resung the tracks. Very disappointing that AT is even at a local level.

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A number of bands used tape loops in live performance. The Roger Taylor note in "Bohemian Rhapsody" was in a tape loop and then, after that bridge, Freddie would come back in live with "So you think you can stomp and spit in my eye/ So you think you can love me and leave me to die ..."

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Oh Please! Pop stars often sound great live.

I like: DeGraw, Mars, Mraz, Maroon5, Fun, Sheeran, Adele, OneRep.... and lot lot lot more.

These guys have at least great skill of singing. Don't cover your inability to sing like star with unfair judgment of them.

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