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How to practice riffs and runs

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Nicogratouille
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Hi!

Is it a good idea to practice runs first staccato and then legato? The reason I ask is I recently stumbled upon a video on youtube where the guy said to do just that, but he doesn't explain why.

Here's the link:

Also, is there any idea to practice the run on a lip-roll or an ng?

Nick

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start slow and speed up. That's the way I always learn. Use a metronome to slow it down to half the speed or less then just slowly increase the speed. It is possibly helpful to do staccato first if you find it helps, then give it a go. I would start with some less complicated riffs first though, perhaps just one or two different notes.

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Thanks for your reply Gina!

Riffs are not that new to me and I can actually tackle some of the more complicated ones or improvise my own. I just need guidance on how to practice them, as practice commits to muscle memory I wanna make sure I'm practicing them right ;)

Start slow and speed up seems to be the way to go. Also, break the riff down into smaller sections. But this to me is ear training and learning the notes. I was thinking more from a vocal technique point of view.

Nick

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Funny, I was thinking about this yesterday! c:

I actually want to learn the way many R&B singers delineate their notes in their runs; it looks so effortless. I have some vocal agility, although the dexterity that they have with their runs is amazing. How does one build vocal agility?

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Ok I got it! Singing the run staccato forces you to hit the pitches dead on, making the run a lot clearer.

Funny, I was thinking about this yesterday! c:

I actually want to learn the way many R&B singers delineate their notes in their runs; it looks so effortless. I have some vocal agility, although the dexterity that they have with their runs is amazing. How does one build vocal agility?

The most important thing to me is the basics. Being able to sing the song without any of the runs and still make it sound good. Work your technique. Agility comes when your voice is well calibrated and working efficiently.

Apart from that, just do what Gina said. Slow it down and speed it up, and have patience!

Nick

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you know i meant to post this then forgot.....runs and riffs get a whole lot easier when you have good breath managment and support..also when you first begin try riffing on one vowel sound and just think out of the box and just let it go....don't worry bout going for specific pitches or note groups...just get the feel of the agility and relaxation you need to pull them off.

it's very similar to a drummer....if he tenses he's done.

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Hi!

Is it a good idea to practice runs first staccato and then legato? The reason I ask is I recently stumbled upon a video on youtube where the guy said to do just that, but he doesn't explain why.

Here's the link:

Also, is there any idea to practice the run on a lip-roll or an ng?

Nick

My definition of a run may be different than yours but I will assume we are referring to the same thing.

I do practice runs staccato as well as legato but I don't put any importance on a specific order. I'm just exercising. Although I can see that staccato first might be an idea since it is more basic.

I like what Bob said here:

you know i meant to post this then forgot.....runs and riffs get a whole lot easier when you have good breath managment and support..also when you first begin try riffing on one vowel sound and just think out of the box and just let it go....don't worry bout going for specific pitches or note groups...just get the feel of the agility and relaxation you need to pull them off.

it's very similar to a drummer....if he tenses he's done.

I usually take a vowel such as ee for example and practice it every which way. Staccato, legato, defined, undefined etc. I go up and down a scale with no break between up and down. Not a whole scale up and a whole scale down (not a whole octave) but rather I use one scale and go up and back down within the 7 notes. But what I find important is the support. It has to be strong because on many runs I need more oomph on that last note. So the run needs full support throughout. Especially when it finished stronger or higher.

I also practice triplets.

I only do small runs when I do them though. Longer runs equals more support.

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