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Improving vocal tone

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Blameitonthevodka
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First of all, I am thanking god that I found this forum because I had to quit singing lessons, plus I feel like I've learned way more with the help of google than I did with my singing teacher.

Basically, I am wondering how I can improve my singing tone....I feel like my tone could be a lot more resonant and louder but I am definitely doing something wrong. I know my breathing and support isn't 100% what it could be. Here's a clip of me singing: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=18Fkm1ZK9fI , hopefully it'll help to identify what I'm doing wrong. Anyway if anyone has any tips for developing a better tone, please let me knowww!

Thank-you=)

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Honestly, my singing teacher just taught me vocal exercises and pretty much nothing about technique or anything else, all of the technique I use is based off of books and google haha.

So far, I've been doing the 'mmm' exercise and trying to practice singing in the mask, I feel like there is some resonance coming from my voice but maybe not as much as there could be. I will definitely research more when it comes to twang and vocal cord closure.

I'm not smiling when I'm singing, but I did recently learn that the top lip should be over the teeth, which I realized myself just by observing singers, and it's something that I'm struggling a bit to do so it might be affecting the way my mouth is moving vertically, maybe creating a little tension.

Thanks so much for your advice, it means a lot to me!!!

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Owens advices are spot on. Something about improving "tone". Your tone, the fundamental quality that defines your voice, is already there, it wont change, like it or not. Usually it does not sound good or bad, rather neutral, the problems and tensions are what disrupt it and brake the plasticity of the vocal production.

As Owen said, as you define it more, resonate better and so on, the quality will improve.

I second on the importance of having orientation to this. A good teacher will not only give you exercises but will be able to explain the purpose and goal, at least the immediate ones.

Blind exercising really does not get you anywhere.

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At least you had a teacher to teach basics. Maybe he was not into teaching "rock" singing or whatever you are into.

We've had several discussions over the years. What makes a good teacher. Should good teachers be able to sing well, also. Does it matter if they could sing, but no longer? Etc, etc. I tend to think, look at the students. See the results of the teacher's work, more important than any actual singing by the teacher. What did his or her students learn and what has it done for them?

That is the sign of a good teacher and good students keyed in to learning what he or she has to teach.

So, keep that in mind, if you are looking for a new teacher. I can't tell you to get another teacher. I'm not even going to say that not having a teacher means you are doomed to a life of horrible singing.

But with a teacher, you can learn things a lot faster because they can see you. Like this bit about pulling lips over the teeth.

More importantly, you should loosely drop the jaw down and back (not aggressively so). An instructor could see when you are jutting the jaw forward and get you to pull back. The lips over the teeth is secondary or an accidental action, nothing to concentrate on. And if you had a better live coach, he or she would catch those things and you will learn much quicker.

So often, here, we say, get a coach and don't often define what kind of coach, how to determine their quality. What to do if you don't have the money to drive 300 miles just for a lesson, and then back home. Here, in Texas, I have driven almost that far to visit the in-laws and I am not driving back in the same day. And all my available spending money went to paying for the gas. Once, maybe, twice a year. I only made the trip once, this year, for a family reunion.

But some people can afford to travel that far and back, just for lessons. And that's a blessing, too. Take advantage of the blessings you have. Opportunities will arise, all you have to do is take them. But I have no idea how to find a good coach in your area because I don't know what country you are in. And we don;t have singing studios built every 1/8 of a mile or anything like that.

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And others will say, quite rightly, if you want the right coach (whatever "right" is for you,) you will find away.

Axl Rose hitchhiked from Indiana to California with a few dollars in his pocket. And slept in the storage unit where GnR ket their equipment. It had no bathroom or facilities. He would have to visit Slash's mother's house for laundry and a soft floor to sleep on.

Madonna left Michigan and made it to New York City with 35 dollars in her pocket.

Tina Turner left Ike. And all of her old recording contracts were rigged against her. When she left, she was flat broke. She started all over again, from absolutely nothing.

Glen Campbell was the son of a share-cropper, looking forward to a glamorous life of picking fruit. To make matters worse, he learned to play guitar by ear and never had singing lessons. So, he probably had the "pick of destiny" and a deal with the devil for that golden voice of his. :D Later, he did learn how to read music charts used in studios. (chord forms and strumming patterns. The Nashville system is similar. The intervals mimick the roman numeral and you just play 1-4-5 in whatever key you are in, for example.)

So, when someone comes along and says, you will do whatever it takes to get the coach you need to become the great singer, they are right. The flip side is the sacrifice. You may have to leave home. Go to another city or country. Start over, dirt poor and starving.

There's plenty of people who did that. Moved to California, to Hollywood, expecting to find fortune and fame, with the brave dedication to get there and work hard. And they did work hard. And are still dirt-poor and unknown.

So, there is some luck and timing involved. Good luck to you.

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For what you were singing and the way you were singing it, it did not sound too bad as far as tone goes.

If you just want louder and more resonant. You answered your own question. With the proper resonance the sound will be louder. And with proper support the sound will be louder.

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For what you were singing and the way you were singing it, it did not sound too bad as far as tone goes.

If you just want louder and more resonant. You answered your own question. With the proper resonance the sound will be louder. And with proper support the sound will be louder.

Yeah, I was reading something here about imagine that the sound is coming from below the vocal cords and somehow that helped me sing with better support

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I am not a teacher. Just someone who sings good or bad. What I have heard for a more vibrant tone HUM and then open into a vowel keeping the feeling and placement of the hum. Ex. MMMMMMMah. MMMMMMoh. That may give you an idea of a more vibrant tone.

If someone says different listen to them instead of me. I am a beginner also. I can very well be wrong.

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I don't think there is actually any strengthening to be done to the diaphragm. It's more a matter of coordination and toning of the muscles surrounding the diaphragm,

"ya'll" (to give it that authentic redneck flavor....)

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