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Why I lose my falsetto? and a bunch of other questions

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Ozone
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I've got a couple questions, again. I didn't want to start 4 new threads so I thought I'd sum it all up into one. Here it go's:

1. Why do I always lose my ability to use falsetto during live performances? I don't particularly use falsetto but I always notice that for about 10 min. after a show my falsetto is totally non-existant. Why is that? Could I be straining and not noticing it my self? When singing live I never feel any sort of pain in my throat. Before I used to get really dried out during a show but I found that sipping citrus juice help me keep my vocal folds moistened.

2. This one is kinda related to the one above but after a gig my voice sounds a little different. It's not something I physically "feel" cause I wear earplugs during gigs and I never even notice anything strange before I take my earplugs out and hear my voice. Is this normal? I always warm up before gigs and almost always remember to warm down. After warming down my voice starts sounding normal again.

3. I'm sort of a belt-type singer and I don't really like the tone of my voice when not belting. How do I improve that? Like, whenever I sing softly all the high notes sound thin and a little breathy. High notes sound falsetto-esque but without that Bee Gees, Justing Hawkins hooty tone.

4. Explain twang to me. I know there are probably hundreds of threads out there on the topic but I'm still not sure what it actually is. Is it the same as singing with a nasal quality? No?

Thanks!

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1. Why do I always lose my ability to use falsetto during live performances? I don't particularly use falsetto but I always notice that for about 10 min. after a show my falsetto is totally non-existant. Why is that? Could I be straining and not noticing it my self? When singing live I never feel any sort of pain in my throat.

What you need to do is enter into a contract with Satan to keep your falsetto. "The folds of destiny." Just kidding. If you don't use falsetto in your performance, why worry about it after the show that didn't really use it? I ask that because there are people here who go through a phase of training where the coordination for falsetto seems to disappear for a while as they learn to sing more fully in the upper notes, which, of course, is what everyone is here for. Almost no one is here just for the F#2 to G4 range, save for a select few.

2. This one is kinda related to the one above but after a gig my voice sounds a little different. It's not something I physically "feel" cause I wear earplugs during gigs and I never even notice anything strange before I take my earplugs out and hear my voice. Is this normal? I always warm up before gigs and almost always remember to warm down. After warming down my voice starts sounding normal again.

Could be you are fully warmed up. Could be you have strained. Some people here think strain is necessary to truly emote through a song. I don't think so. And the one time I intentionally introduced strain for an effect, I got spanked, so to speak. Your milage may vary.

3. I'm sort of a belt-type singer and I don't really like the tone of my voice when not belting. How do I improve that? Like, whenever I sing softly all the high notes sound thin and a little breathy. High notes sound falsetto-esque but without that Bee Gees, Justing Hawkins hooty tone.

Now, I'm confused. You don't normally like to use falsetto, you don't like to sing anything that is not "belty." So, why worry about the softer falsetto-ish sound that is somehow not bee gees or justin hawkins - ish?

I sense conflict.

4. Explain twang to me. I know there are probably hundreds of threads out there on the topic but I'm still not sure what it actually is. Is it the same as singing with a nasal quality? No?

Twang is described as a narrowing of the epiglottic funnel, something of a formant, or resonant space, quite often used on the higher notes, though it can be used elsewhere. It is not the same as singing with nasal quality though it may lead to access to the nasal resonances.

Nasal quality, as far as I'm concerned is either singing through the nose (the way that Chef Paula Deen speaks) or singing with a blocked off sinus, like Sylvester Stallone's "Rocky." Using the resonance in the sinus spaces does not create a nasal tone, as far as I know.

And yes, there are many threads on twang that can explain it far better than I can. Funny, though, because I have been told that I twang quite well.

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What you need to do is enter into a contract with Satan to keep your falsetto. "The folds of destiny." Just kidding. If you don't use falsetto in your performance, why worry about it after the show that didn't really use it? I ask that because there are people here who go through a phase of training where the coordination for falsetto seems to disappear for a while as they learn to sing more fully in the upper notes, which, of course, is what everyone is here for. Almost no one is here just for the F#2 to G4 range, save for a select few.

Could be you are fully warmed up. Could be you have strained. Some people here think strain is necessary to truly emote through a song. I don't think so. And the one time I intentionally introduced strain for an effect, I got spanked, so to speak. Your milage may vary.

Now, I'm confused. You don't normally like to use falsetto, you don't like to sing anything that is not "belty." So, why worry about the softer falsetto-ish sound that is somehow not bee gees or justin hawkins - ish?

I sense conflict.

Twang is described as a narrowing of the epiglottic funnel, something of a formant, or resonant space, quite often used on the higher notes, though it can be used elsewhere. It is not the same as singing with nasal quality though it may lead to access to the nasal resonances.

Nasal quality, as far as I'm concerned is either singing through the nose (the way that Chef Paula Deen speaks) or singing with a blocked off sinus, like Sylvester Stallone's "Rocky." Using the resonance in the sinus spaces does not create a nasal tone, as far as I know.

And yes, there are many threads on twang that can explain it far better than I can. Funny, though, because I have been told that I twang quite well.

Hey, thanks a lot for taking the time to do all this. Let me rephrase that falsetto part. It's not that I don't LIKE to use falsetto in my performance but I don't particularly NEED to use falsetto. If I could maintain my ability to sing in falsetto for a whole show I might have some use for it, e.g. to use it as an effect. If I never learn how to maintain falsetto for an hour I'll be a bit bummed but it won't be the end of the world for me. The reason I'm asking is because I was just wondering whether it's normal or not and should I be concerned.

And the thing about belting is that I don't really like the tone of my voice when it's not belty at the moment. But I'd love to learn how to sing without belt and not sound breathy and thin.

Oh, and I've got another question: I usually don't have problems with strain except for when I'm recording in a studio. Has anybody got any experience with this? It's some sort of psychological thing, isn't it? Any ideas on how to control my nerves/what ever is that's causing me to strain? The reason I'm asking is that I just got back from recording my bands first EP and I had some trouble controlling vibrato (caused by tension/vocal weight(?)) but it got better after awhile, probably due to me relaxing a bit more.

Thanks!

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I've got a couple questions, again. I didn't want to start 4 new threads so I thought I'd sum it all up into one. Here it go's:

1. Why do I always lose my ability to use falsetto during live performances? I don't particularly use falsetto but I always notice that for about 10 min. after a show my falsetto is totally non-existant. Why is that? Could I be straining and not noticing it my self? When singing live I never feel any sort of pain in my throat. Before I used to get really dried out during a show but I found that sipping citrus juice help me keep my vocal folds moistened.

Whenever I sing with strain for a longer perioed of time, my falsetto is the first thing to go. So based upon my own experience, I would not leave this unchecked. I understand from your second reply that falsetto is not usually used in your repertoire, but I would still use this as a way to check your vocal health after singing sessions. Now that I've been practicing with a teacher and learned the basics alot better, I can sing for a whole lot longer, more demanding songs and still keep my falsetto and not have "weird thins" happening and I believe that is the case for everyone when singing in a healthy manner.

2. This one is kinda related to the one above but after a gig my voice sounds a little different. It's not something I physically "feel" cause I wear earplugs during gigs and I never even notice anything strange before I take my earplugs out and hear my voice. Is this normal? I always warm up before gigs and almost always remember to warm down. After warming down my voice starts sounding normal again.

This was the case for me aswell. The falsetto went first, then I would sound hoarse or at least different. Of course this can vary individually, but I would certainly check it out. It sounds like you have strained and this is the effect of it.

3. I'm sort of a belt-type singer and I don't really like the tone of my voice when not belting. How do I improve that? Like, whenever I sing softly all the high notes sound thin and a little breathy. High notes sound falsetto-esque but without that Bee Gees, Justing Hawkins hooty tone.

I know alot of people here are talking about how to get power in the upper range or how to make high notes sound more belty. To me however, I have more of your problem I think. To me, it's alot harder to sing soft/light in the higher ranges and still maintain connection and fullness. I think however with proper training the higher ranges become easier and easier, coordination becomes better and better and you can sing for longer amounts of time in those ranges and also with more dynamics.

4. Explain twang to me. I know there are probably hundreds of threads out there on the topic but I'm still not sure what it actually is. Is it the same as singing with a nasal quality? No?

I'm not very good with the technical language regarding twang, but it is not nasal. It sounds somewhat nasal, and being nasal CAN help you find twang, but the end result is not nasal.

It's hard to describe as it is a sensation.

Finally, I'm still a beginner, so take my "advice" with a grain of salt.

Cheers!

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Ozone, it's possible that your voice sounds different to you after a gig because it is now more resonant, "feels" deeper to you. Fact of the matter is we cannot sing like we speak, for just about everyone of us speaks in a way that is not conducive to singing. So, maybe, your voice is working right, after singing, until you fall back into your regular speach patterns. Especially if you modify vowel sounds away from your speaking accent during your singing.

Also, and this is one that tripped me up, as well, what you may think is falsetto for you may just be lightly connected full head tone, and not an actual falsetto.

And I don't know of anyone who sings falsetto all the way through a set though some use falsetto for certain parts of a song, like King Diamond from Mercyful Fate. Now, he does have a contract with Satan to have that voice. (insert devil smiley here.)

And, again, I am just an amateur. An amateur who, as an electrician, as dug ditches while butchering Shakespeare for my own amusement, and traded lyrics with my friend, John, while singing "Jet City Woman" in the original key while perched atop a 12 foot ladder, making up wire junctions. Hey, it helped the time pass by.

"To be, or not to be? That is the question. Whether 'tis nobler in the mind to suffer the slings and arrows or outrageous fortune or, ... to get some more 4 inch PVC so that we can finish this "explictative avoided" line to the phone demarc..."

"Alas, poor Yuric, I knew him well ... couldn't bend a stick of pipe to save his life ..."

"Jet City Woman

No more nights alone

I'm almost home..."

Well, I guess, you had to be there.

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